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HysteryDiagnosis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-25-11 01:31 PM
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Scientists Turn On Fountain of Youth in Yeast
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/1111231904...

Scientists Turn On Fountain of Youth in Yeast

A chemical variation of a "fuel-gauge" enzyme that senses energy in yeast acts like a life span clock: It is present in young organisms and progressively diminished as yeast cells age.

In a report in the September 16 edition of Cell, the scientists describe their identification of a new level of regulation of this age-related protein variant, showing that when they remove it, the organism's life span is cut short and when they restore it, life span is dramatically extended.

In the case of yeast, the discovery reveals molecular components of an aging pathway that appears related to one that regulates longevity and lifespan in humans, according to Jef Boeke, Ph.D., professor of molecular biology, genetics and oncology, and director of the HiT Center and Technology Center for Networks and Pathways, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

"This control of longevity is independent of the type described previously in yeast which had to do with calorie restriction," Boeke says. "We believe that for the first time, we have a biochemical route to youth and aging that has nothing to do with diet." The chemical variation, known as acetylation because it adds an acetyl group to an existing molecule, is a kind of "decoration" that goes on and off a protein -- in this case, the protein Sip2 -- much like an ornament can be put on and taken off a Christmas tree, Boeke says. Acetylation can profoundly change protein function in order to help an organism or system adapt quickly to its environment. Until now, acetylation had not been directly implicated in the aging pathway, so this is an all-new role and potential target for prevention or treatment strategies, the researchers say.<<
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saras Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-25-11 02:13 PM
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1. Now if they can convincingly explain why aging is so common BEFORE messing with it...
It's the sort of thing where you need to ask the obvious big-picture question - what purpose does this serve within the existing ecosystems of this planet, and what are we risking by messing with it - BEFORE releasing their productions to the world.
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sam11111 Donating Member (638 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-25-11 05:29 PM
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2. you seem to be saying Death has a purpose within the ecosystem,yet we must not
risk harming ourselves by releasing into the ecosystem

the goal of those researchers - genes for human or yeast immortality.
In short, Death has a purpose and so should continue.
2.Don't mess with making genes for immortality as that will wreck the ecosystem and kill us all.

So....they will help Death..which will preserve its time honored role as part of the ecosystem.

As for me, esteemed correspondent ( my tone is cordial and friendly not being sarcastic at all) I love the idea of genes for immortality.

I would like to live long enough to learn what. Science will find in the future as answers to the Big Questions.
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provis99 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-25-11 05:43 PM
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3. except that evolution programmed us to want immortality.
blame evolution for the world crisis.
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HysteryDiagnosis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-27-11 09:25 AM
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4. Mmmmmm, yeast infections that never die..... wouldn't that be the
rage????
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