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Jack Rabbit Chess Report for October 8: Reunification match knotted

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:45 AM
Original message
Jack Rabbit Chess Report for October 8: Reunification match knotted
Edited on Sun Oct-08-06 12:00 PM by Jack Rabbit

The Jack Rabbit Chess Report
for the week ending October 8



Photo: Mikhail Tal (left) and Mikhail Botvinnik
in the wolrd championship match, Moscow, 1960
from ChessBase.com


Contents

Post 1: News for the week
Post 2: Diagrams and other features
Post 3: Games from Current and Recent Events


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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:46 AM
Response to Original message
1. News for the week ending October 8
Topalov, Kramnik knotted in Reunification Match



Classical world champion Vladimir Kramnik defeated FIDE world champion Veselin Topalov in the tenth game of the world championship reunification match today in Elista, Kalmykia, Russia, knotting the match at 5 points each.

Topalov won games eight and nine on Thursday and Saturday to take a one-point lead. Topalov's victories in games 8 and 9 were his first two over the board. Kramnik forfeited game 5 in a dispute over playing conditions. Kramnik has stated firmly that he is plying the match under protest and that he will sue FIDE after the match.

Game 7, which ended in a draw, and game 8 are featured elsewhere in this thread. Game 9, which was a remarkably complex victory for Topalov, and today's game will be featured next week.

Most neutral observers in the chess world have expressed support for Kramnik's position in the matter of the forfeited game. Most of the blame for the controversy surrounding game 5 have been placed on Topalov's manager, Bulgarian grandmaster Silvio Danailov, for bringing a ridiculous protest to the appeals committee and to FIDE itself for mishandling the protest. Former world champion Anatoly Karpov and his two-time challenger, Viktor Korchnoi, have each gone so far as to state he would not have continued with the matched unless the forfeit were repealed. The incident has renewed talk of a players' revolt against FIDE.

FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, who is also President of Kalmykia, an autonomous republic in Russia, replaced the appeals committee at Kramnik's request before the match resumed after a delay of several days.

Before the seventh game Wednesday, Danailov issued a press release pointing out the coincidence of Kramnik's moves with the recommendations of Fritz 9, a stronger relative of my silicon sidekick, Fritz 4.01. Other analysis performed independently show that Kramnik's statistics vis a vis Fritz 9's recommendations are not unusual for a strong grandmaster. Mark Crowther, editor of the website The Week in Chess for the London Chess Center, said, "(T)his is one of the most stupid press releases I've ever seen."

The match resumes with round 11 on Tuesday with Topalov playing White; Kramnik will have White in the final game on Thursday. If the match ends in a 6-6 tie, a tiebreaker round consisting of rapid and blitz games will be played on Friday.


Junior World Championships in progress in Yerevan



The Junior World Championships are underway in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia.

The event is divided into two categories, one general and one for girls.

After the completion of the fifth round Saturday, Nikita Vitiugov, 19, of Russia and Yuriy Kryvoruchko, 20, of Ukraine share the lead in the general division with 4 points, followed by five players tied for third with 4 points each. In the girls division, Bathuyag Mongontuul, 19, of Mongolia is setting the pace with 4 points, followed by five players including 17-year-old Armenian-born American Tatev Abrahamyan. Twelve-year-old Hou Yifan of China, a sentimental favorite all over the world, is among the leaders with 3 points.

The competition is open to rated players 20 years old and younger. The event concludes after the 13th round on Monday, October 16.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-10-06 11:27 AM
Response to Reply #1
9. Kramnik and Topalov draw game 11: go to final game tied
Edited on Tue Oct-10-06 12:00 PM by Jack Rabbit
Veseilin Topalov and Vladimir Kramnik played 66 moves to a draw today in the eleventh round of the World Championship Reunification Match in Elista, Kalmykia, Russia.

The players are even at 5 points each.

The twelfth and final regulation game will be played Thursday. If that game is drawn, a tiebreaker round of rapid and blitz games will be played Friday.

The winner of the match will claim to be the first sole world chess champion since 1993.

The match has been marred with a controversy over playing conditions that resulted in fifth game being awarded to Topalov by default. Kramnik is playing the match under protest.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 12:02 PM
Response to Reply #1
10. Thursday Update: Game 12 drawn; tiebreaks tomorrow
Edited on Thu Oct-12-06 12:19 PM by Jack Rabbit
Classical world champion Vladimir Kramnik and FIDE world champion Veselin Topalov drew the 12th game of their world championship reunification match in 47 moves today in Elista, Kalmykia, Russia.



Kramnik and Topalov during today's game in Elista
Photo: from the Official Match Website

As the game was the last scheduled in the event and each player has 6 points, the two world champions will play a tiebreak round tomorrow.

The tiebreak round will begin with a new drawing for colors followed by four rapid games. In a rapid game, each player has twenty-five minutes to complete his moves. If the two champions split the rapid game, there will be another drawing for colors followed by two blitz game (each player will have five minutes to complete his moves). If the players divide those games, lots will be drawn with the winner choosing a color for the final sudden-death game. In this game, White will have six minutes and Black five, but in the event of a drawn game Black will be declared the winner of the match.

While Topalov is currently considered a slightly stronger player Kramnik in a regular time control, Kramnik is generally considered the better of the two at rapid and blitz games.

Kramnik has been playing the match under protest since game 5 was awarded to Topalov by default in a dispute over access to toilets. Most independent observers in the chess world believe the matter was mishandled by the match organizers and by officials of FIDE, the governing body of international chess and that the point was awarded to Toplaov unfairly. Many have expressed the view that unless the forfeit is repealed and game 5 played, a Topalov victory in the match will be meaningless.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:48 AM
Response to Original message
2. Diagrams and other features on the JR Chess Report

!""""""""#
$tMvWlVmT%
$OoOoOoOo%
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$+ + + + %
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/(((((((()

White to move
This position is a theoretical draw

Does this picture make sense to you? If not, or if it looks like a bunch of Wingdings, please click here.

Diagrams used in the Jack Rabbit Chess Report are made with Chess Merida, a true type font that is available as freeware at the above link.

Also, the JR chess report makes the main variation in annotations more distinct and readable by putting it in red. A secondary variation, is in blue and other colors are used if needed.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:50 AM
Response to Original message
3. Games from current and recent events
Edited on Sun Oct-08-06 12:01 PM by Jack Rabbit

Chess Games
Analysis by JR and Fritz


Veselin Topalov - Vladimir Kramnik, Match for the World Title/Round 7, Elista
Vladimir Kramnik - Veselin Topalov, Match for the World Title/Round 8, Elista
Vlastimil Jansa - Janis Klovans, Senior World Championship/Valle d'Aosta
Alexander Areshchenko - Vyacheslav Ikonnikov, Isle of Man Open, Port Erin
Elli Phtz - Jeremy Fraser-Mitchell, Isle of Man Open, Port Erin

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:51 AM
Response to Reply #3
4. Topalov - Kramnik, Match/Round 7, Elista



Topalov and Kramnik in Elista
Photo: from the Official Match Website

Veselin Topalov vs. Vladimir Kramnik
Mathch for the World Title, Round 7
Elista, Kalmykia Russia, October 2006

Queen's Gambit: Slav Defense


1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Bd3 dxc4 6. Bxc4 c5 7. 0-0 a6 8. Bb3 cxd4 9. exd4 Nc6 10. Nc3 Be7 11. Re1 0-0 12. a4

  • An alternative is 12. d5 exd5 13. Nxd5 Nxd5 14. Qxd5 Qxd5 15. Bxd5 Bf6 with an equal game.
12. -- Bd7 13. Ne5?!

  • The text move is not as strong as it looks. White has three pieces attacking d5 and thus should eliminate Black's pawn at e6.
  • If 13. d5! exd5 14. Nxd5 Nxd5 15. Bxd5
    • 15. -- Bf4 16. h3 Bh5 17. Bxc6 Qxd1 18. Rxd1 Bxc6 with a balanced gzme.
    • 15. -- Rc8?! 16. Bf4 Bb4 17. Re4 Ba5 +=
13. -- Be8

  • Black prefers to preserve his Bishop.
  • If instead of the text 13. -- b6 14. Nxd7 Qxd7 15. d5 exd5 then:
    • 16. Nxd5 Nxd5 17. Qxd5 Rad8 18. Qxd7 Rxd7 19. Be3 and White has two active Bishops in a open center.
    • 16. Bxd5 16. Bf4 Bb4 Re4 Ba5 and White has more active pieces.
  • If after the text White plays 14. Nxc6 then 14. -- Bxc6 15. Bg5 Rc8 16. Rc1 Qb6 17. Qxd5 Rad8 18. Ne2 h6 and Black has the initiative.
14. Be3 Rc8 15. Rc1 Nb4 16. Qf3

  • Black has better piece activity. The text is an attempt by White to keep up.
  • If 16. Bc4 Nc6 17. b3 then:
    • 17. -- Bb4
      • 18. Ng4 Nd5 19. Nh6+ Kh8 20. Bxd5 and Black has a number of tactical opportinities.
      • 18. Nd3 Bxc3 19. Rxc3 Nxd4 20. Nc5 e5 and Black has a spatial plus in the center.
    • 17. -- Ba3 18. Rc2 Be7 19. Qf3 b5 20. axb5 axb5 21. Nxb5 with a blaanced position.
16. -- Bc6 17. Qh3

  • White is trying to see if he can build an attack on the kingside.
  • A better plan is 17. Qg3 Qd6 18. Bh6 Ne8 19. Red1 Qb8 20. Bf4
17. -- Bd5 18. Nxd5 Nbxd5

  • White has succeeded in equalizing the game.
  • It makes little difference which Knight Black chooses to take on d5. If 18. -- Nfxd5 19. Rxc8 Qxc8 20. Rc1 Qd8 then:
    • 21. Bc4 Bd6 22. Bd2 Qe7 with a level game.
    • 21. Bd2 b6 22. Bxb4 Bxb4 and the game is equal.
19. Rcd1 Rc7 20. Bg5 Qc8 21. Qf3

  • 21. a5 Rd8 22. Re2 Ne8 23. Bd2 Bf6 24. Qh5 Nd6 is level.
21. -- Rd8!? 22. h4!?

  • White is still intent on a kingside attack. However, he would do better to play on the other wing.
  • If 22. a5 Qb8 23. Rc1 then:
    • 23. --h6 24. Bd2 Bd6 25. Rxc7 Qxc7 26. Rc1 with equal chances.
    • 23. -- Bb4 24. Rxc7 Qxc7 25. Rc1 Qxa5 with an unclear position.
22. -- h6 23. Bc1?!

  • This is an inaccuracy. The Bishop at c1 prevents the free movement of the heavy pieces on the home rank. Black will now seize the initiative.
  • If 23. Bd2 Bd6 24. Qg3 Kf8 then:
    • 25. Re2 Qb8 26. a5 Qa7 27. Qd3 Rdc8 and the position is unclear.
    • 25. a5 Qb8 26. Bc3 Kg8 27. Ba2 Nxc3 and after the recapture on c3, Black will have superior pawn structure and an active Rook on the c-file.
23. -- Bb4 24. Rf1 Bd6 25. g3

  • Black now has a small advantage owing to more active pieces.
  • 25. Bd2 Qb8 26. Rfe1 Rdc8 27. Qg3 Ne7 is satisfactory for Black.
25. -- b6 26. Qe2

  • The text strikes at Black's kingside pawns.
  • 26. Rfe1 Qb7 27. Bd2 Rdc8 28. a5 Rb8 29. axb6 Qxb6 contiues to give Black an edge with piece activity.
26. -- Ne7?!

  • Black withdraws the Knight from the center, although there is no hint of an attack against it.
  • 26. -- Nb4 27. Rfe1 Nfd5 28. Qg4 Kf8 29. a5 bxa5 30. Bd2 Qb8 Black has better piece acticivity and an extra pawn
27. Rfe1 Bxe5 28. dxe5 Rxd1 29. Qxd1

  • The game is now level.
  • The alternate method of recapture also maintains the equalibrium: 29. Bxd1 Nd7 30. Bd2 Rc5 31. f4 Nf5 32. Qf2 Rd5
29. -- Nfd5 30. Bd2 Rc5

  • The position is equal, but there are still too many things happening for the players to think about a draw.
  • 30. -- Nf5 31. Qg4 Rc5 32. Re4 Qd7 33. Rc4 Rxc4 34. Qxc4 is even.
31. Qg4 Nf5 32. Qe4 b5 33. h5

  • As he was earlier, White is still trying to launch a kingside attack.
  • If 33. a5 Qc7 34. Re2 Qa7 35. Kh2 Qd7 then:
    • 36. Be1 Qc7 37. f4 and White has a small edge in space.
    • 36. f4 b4 37. Bxd5 exd5 38. Qxb4 Rb5 39. Qa4 and White's space is a little better than Black's active pieces.
33. -- bxa4 34. Qxa4 Rb5 35. Rc1 Qb7 36. Bc2

  • Black's piece activity still gives him a small edge.
  • 36. Bxd5 Qxd5 37. Bc3 Qf3 38. Qd1 Qc6 39. Ra1 Rb8 40. Ra5 is equal.
36. -- Nb6 37. Qg4 Rxb2 38. Be4 Qd7 39. Be1

  • On the board, Black's pieces are active, but it's not so much an advantage that he can get much going.
  • 39. Bc3 Rb3 40. Rd1 Qc7 41. Ba1 Rb4 and Black maintains an small edge with active pieces.
39. -- Nd5 40. Bd3?

  • White attacks the a-pawn.
  • If 40. Rd1
    • 40. -- Nfe7 41. Bd3 Rb3 42. Bxa6 Nf5 43. Be2 Ra3 with a level game
    • 40. -- Qc8?! 41. Rxd5! exd5 42. Bxf5 Qc1 43. Kf1 and White has a strong advantagein in piece mobility.


Black: Vladimir Kramnik
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/(((((((()

White: Veselin Topalov
Position after 40. Be4d3

40. -- Nb4!

  • Black neatly defends the attacked pawn and counterattacks in one stroke.
  • 40. -- Ra2 41. Rb1 Ra3 42. Qe4 Ra4 43. Qe2 Qc8 leave Black with all his important points defended and his Knights dominating the center.
41. Bf1 Nd3 42. Qd1

  • Also playable is 42. Rd1 Nxe5 43. Rxd7 Nxg4 44. Bxa6 Ra2 45. Bd3 Ne5 then:
    • 46. Rd8+ Kh7 47. Bb1 Nf3+ and Black has an extra pawn.
    • 46. Bb1 Nxd7 47. Bxa2 Nf6 and Black has an extra pawn and is likely to pick up another.
42. -- Nxe5 43. Qxd7 Nxd7 44. Rc8+

  • Black has two extra pawns, but White has two Bishops against two Knights.
  • If 44. Bxa6? Nb6 45. Bd3 then:
    • 45. -- Ne7 46. Bc3 Rb3 47. Be4 Ra3 and Black is still a pawn up with the resources to refute any White attack.
    • 45. -- Nd7? is a mistake in that it leaves c8 undefnced: 46. Rc8+ Kh7 47. Bc3 Rb3 48. Bc2 and White is close to winning.
44. -- Kh7 45. Rc7 Rb1

  • Black is having trouble making his two extra pawns count. This attrmpt to exchange a pair of minor pieces kook like a good idea.
  • 45. -- Nf6 46. Bxa6 Ra2 47. Bd3 Ra3 48. Bxf5+ exf5 49. Rxf7 Kg8 and Black's extra pawns are gone with nothing gained.
46. Rxd7 Rxe1 47. Rxf7

  • White has regained one of the pawns, but not the remote passed pawn.
  • 47. Kg2 Kg8 48. Bxa6 Re4 49. Rd8+ Kh7 is level.
47. -- a5 48. Kg2 Kg8 49. Ra7 Re5 50. g4 Nd6

  • Black's pawn weaknesses make it difficult for him to win.
  • 50. -- Nd4 51. Bd3 Rg5 52. f3 Nc6 53. Rc7 Rd5 54. Bg6 and White's piece activiity should assure him of the half-point.
51. Bd3 Kf8 52. Bg6 Rd5

  • 52. -- Rc5 53. f3 Rb5 54. Kf2 Rd5 55. Ke1 Rc5 56. Ke2 with a game headed to a draw.
53. f3 e5 54. Kf2 Rd2+

  • 54. -- Rc5 55. Ke2 Rd5 56. Kf2 Rb5 57. Ke2 Rc5 accomplishes nothing for either side.
55. Ke1 Rd5 56. Ke2 Rb5 57. Rd7

  • 57. Bc2 Rd5 58. Ke1 Rc5 59. Kd2 Nc8 60. Rb7 doesn't give Black any prospects of asvancing the a-pawn.
57. -- Rd5 58. Ra7 Rb5

  • 58. -- Rc5 59. Kd2 Nc4+ 60. Ke2 Nd6 61. Kd2 Nc4+ 62. Ke2 is balanced.
59. Bd3 Rd5 60. Bg6 -

  • Both Topalov and Kramnik played this game superbly. Neither gave the other much hope of a victory.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:53 AM
Response to Reply #3
5. Kramnik - Topalov, Match/Round 8, Elista



Veselin Topalov
Photo: ChessBase.de (Germany)

Vladimir Kramnik vs. Veselin Topalov
Mathch for the World Title, Round 8
Elista, October 2006

Queen's Gambit: Meran Defense


1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. e3 Nbd7 6. Bd3 dxc4 7. Bxc4 b5 8. Be2 Bb7 9. 0-0 b4 10. Na4 c5?!

  • This is a mistake, after which White gets a strong position.
  • Better is to renforce the pawn before advancing: 10. -- Rc8 11. Qb3 c5 12 Nxc5 Bxc5 13. dxc5 a5 14. a3 and White has only a small edge controlling open lines.


11. dxc5 Nxc5 12. Bb5+ Ncd7 13. Ne5 Qc7 14. Qd4 Rd8 15. Bd2?!

  • From Black's tenth move to here, White has enjoyed a strong game, but now throws it away.
  • If 15. Qxz7 Bd6 16. f4 0-0 17. Nxd7 Nxd7 18. Bd2 Nf6 19. Rac1 then White White continues to dominate the open lines.
  • else if 15. Nxd7 Nxd7 16. Qxa7 then:
    • 16. -- Bd6 17. f4 0-0 18. Rd1 Nf6 19. Bd2 and White's pieces are a great deal more active.
    • 16. -- Be7 17. Bd2 0-0 18. Rac1 Qb8 19. Qxb8 Nxb8 20. Rfd1 and White's pieces control more open space.
15. -- Qa5!

  • A fine move by Black that seizes the initiative.
  • 15. -- a6 16. Rac1 Qa5 17. Bc6 Bxc6 18. Nxc6 Qxa4 is an equal position.
16. Bc6 Be7?!

  • Alas, the initiative is short-lived.
  • Better is 16. -- Bxc6 17. Nxc6 Qxa4 18. Nxd8 Bc5 19. Qh4 Kxd8 with equality (according to Fritz); Black's King safety leaves something to be desired (according to JR).
17. Rfc1

  • White would do better with 17. b3 0-0 18. Bxd7 Nxd7 19. Nxd7 when:
    • 19. -- Bc6 20. Nac5 Bxc5 21. Qxc5 Qxc5 22. Nxc5 is a level game.
    • 19. -- e5 20. Qxe5 Qxe5 21. Nxe5 and White's centrally posted Knight gives him a slight edge, at least for the moment.
17. -- Bxc6!

  • For the defender, exchanging off White's attacking pieces is a wise decision.
  • 17. -- 0-0 18. Nc4 Qc7 19. Bxb7 Nc5 20. Qe5 Qxe5 21. Nxe5 Nxb7 and White's centralized Knight is a samll advantage.
18. Nxc6 Qxa4 19. Nxd8 Bxd8 20. Qxb4 Qxb4 21. Bxb4 Nd5

  • Out of the exchanges, Black has emerged with two minor pieces for a Rook and a pawn.
  • Black's centralized Knight and the Bishop sitting on the apex of two open diagonals give him an advantage, but his weakness on the queenside light squares is potentially troubling.
  • Black might do better by 21. -- h5 22. Rc6 h4 23. Bc3 h3 24. Rc1 hxg2 25. Kxg2 Nd5 when Black's Rook also becomes active.
22. Bd6 f5 23. Rc8 N5b6!

  • Forcing White's Rook off the back rank gives Black more freedom.
  • If 23. -- N7b6 24. Rb8then:
    • 34. -- a5 25. Rc1 g5 26. Be5 Rg8 27. Bc7 Nxc7 28. Rxc7 Nd7 and White cannot continue his attack since both Rooks are en prise.
    • 24. -- g5 25. Rb7 Bf6 26. Rc1 Rg8 27. Rxa7 Bxb2 28. Rc6 Rg7 is level.
24. Rc6 Be7

  • If 24. -- Kf7 25. Rac1 Bf6 26. b4 Nd5 then:
    • 27. Ra6
      • 27. -- Nc3 28. Kf1 Ra8 is equal.
      • 27. --Ra8 28. a4 g5 and White stands slightly better with his active Rooks.
    • 27. a4 Ne5 28. Bxe5 Bxe5 and Black is slightly better for his active minor pieces.
25. Rd1 Kf7 26. Rc7 Ra8

  • The game is starting to look very drawish.
  • After 26. -- Rc8 27. Rxc8 Nxc8 28. Bxe7 Kxe7 29. Rc1 Kd8 no one will have an easy time making progess.
27. Rb7 Ke8 28. Bxe7 Kxe7 29. Rc1

  • 29. f3 a5 30. Rc7 Rd8 31. e4 fxe4 32. fxe4 Na4 33. Rd4 Nac5 and neither side can start an attack than cannot be easily defended.
29. -- a5 30. Rc6 Nd5 31. h4 h6

  • If 31. -- Nb4 32. Rcc7 Rd8 33. Rc5
    • 33. -- aa4 34. Rc4 Nd3 35. Rc3 and the balance is maintained after 35. -- N3e5.
    • 33. -- Rb8?! 34. Rxb8 Nxb8 35. Rxa5 and White has both won another pawn and has a Rook that is more active than either of Black's Knights.
32. a4 g5 33. hxg5 hxg5 34. Kf1 g4 35. Ke2 N5f6

  • 35. -- f4 36. e4 Nb4 37. Rc1 Na6 38. Rb5 Rb8 and Black has an edge in kingside space, but nothing that likely can be converted to a win.
36. b3

  • The text is more of a waiting move than anything else.
  • If 36. f3 gxf3+ 37. gxf3 then:
    • 37. -- Nd5 38. e4 fxe4 39. fxe4 Nb4 40. Rc4 Ra6 contains few prospects for either side.
    • 37. -- Ne8 38. b3 Nd6 39. Rbc7 e5 and Black has in insigificant advantage in space.
36. -- Ne8 37. f3 g3 38. Rc1 Nef6

  • The position is balanced.
  • If 38. -- Nd6 39. Rbc7 then:
    • 39. -- Ne8 40. Rc8 Ra7 41. Rh1 Nef6 42. Rh3 Rb7 give Black a small advantage in piece activity.
    • 39. -- e5 40. Rd1 Rb8 41. Rc3 Rb6 42. Rd5 Ra6 is level.
39. f4 Kd6 40. Kf3 Nd5 41. Kxg3?

  • Quite simply put, this move is awful. The black pawn at g3 was, at lest momentarily, benefitting White by blocking Black's access on the g-file.
  • If 41. Rb5 e5 42. Rd1 e4+ then:
    • 43. Ke2 N7f6 44. Rd4 Ke6 45. Rc4 Ng4 and Black has more active Knights than White has Rooks. but it is far from a winning advatage.
    • 43. Kxg3 N7f6 44. Rd2 Ke6 45. Rc2 Nxe3 and again, Black has no attack that White cannot easily denfend.
41. -- Nc5

  • Black's Knights are so beautiful that they should be entered in a horse show.
  • 41. -- Nxe3 42. b4 axb4 43. Rxb4 Nd5 44. Rd1 Nc5 45. Rbd4 Nxa4 also yields Black a winning advantage.
42. Rg7

  • No better for White is 42. Rb5 Ne4+ 43. Kf3 Rg8 44. Rxa5 Rg3+ 45. Ke2 Rxe3+
42. -- Rb8 43. Ra7 Rg8+

  • Inferior is 43. -- Rxb3 44. Rxa5 Rxe3+ 45. Kh2 Nd3, but Black should still win.
44. Kf3

  • White would hold out longer after 44. Kh2 Nxe3 45. Rc3 Rh8+ 46. Kg1 Nd5 47. Rf3 Nb4, but Black should win.


Black: Veselin Topalov
!""""""""#
$ + + +t+%
$R + + + %
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$ + + +p+%
$+ R + + %
/(((((((()

White: Vladimir Kramnik
Position after 44. Kg3f3

44. -- Ne4!

  • This is the fastest route to a win. White's kingside pawns are paralyzed.
  • 44. -- Nxb3? 45. Ra6+ Ke7 46. Rc2 Rb8 47. Rcc6 returns the game to a drawish position.
45. Ra6+ Ke7 46. Rxa5

  • If 46. Ra7+ Kf6 47. Ke2 Rxg2+ then:
    • 48. Kd3 Nb4+
      • 49. Kc4 Nd6+ 50. Kc5 Nd3+ wins a Rook.
      • 49. Kd4 Rd2+ 50. Kc4 Rd5 and White has no useful moves.
    • 48. Ke1 Rg1+ wins the Rook.
46. -- Rg3+ 47. Ke2 Rxe3+ 48. Kf1 Rxb3 49. Ra7+

  • 49. Kg1 Rb2 50. Rb5 Ra2 51. Rcb1 Nxf4 and Black will win at least a pawn.
49. -- Kf6 50. Ra8 Nxf4 51. Ra1

  • 51. Rg8 Ke7 52. Rd1 Ra3 53. Rg7+ Kf6 54. Rg8 Rxa4 is lost for White.
51. -- Rb2 52. a5 Rf2+ 53. 0-1

  • Mate is at hand.
  • If 53. Kg1 then:
    • Rxg2+
      • 54. Kf1 Rf2+ 55. Ke1 Nd3+ 56. Kd1 Nc3#
      • 54. Kh1 Ng3#
    • else if 53. Ke1 Nd3+ 54. Kd1 Nc3#
  • Kramnik resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:54 AM
Response to Reply #3
6. Jansa - Klovans, Senior World Championship, Valle d'Aosta



Vlastimil Jansa
Photo: ChessBase.de (Germany)

Vlastimil Jansa vs. Janis Klovans
Senior World Champiohsip, Round 11
Valle d'Aosta (Italy), September 2006

Spanish Grand Royal Game: Zaitsev Defense


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. 0-0 Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 0-0 9. h3 Bb7 10. d4 Re8 11. Nbd2 Bf8 12. d5

  • A satisfactory alternative is 12. a4 exd4 13. cxd4 Na5 14. axb5 axb5 15. e5.
12. -- Nb8 13. Nf1 Nbd7 14. N3h2

  • The game is even. Typical of the Spanish Game, White's pieces are pointed kingside, but Black's defense is solid.
  • If 14. Ng3 Be7 15. a4 then:
    • 15. -- c5 16. Nf5 Qa5 17. Bg5 b4 18. cxb4 and White has thee usual edge in central space.
    • 15. -- g6 16. Bh6 bxa4 17. Bxa4 Rc8 18. Qe2 also give White the edge in space and piece activity.
14. -- Nc5 15. Bc2 c6 16. b4 Ncd7 17. dxc6 Bxc6 18. Bg5

  • The position is even. Black will either play his Queen to c7 or his King's Bishop to e7 in order to free his Knights.
  • If 18. a4 Qc7 19. Bb2 Nb6 then:
    • 20. axb5 axb5 21. Nd2 Be7 with equality.
    • 20. a5 Nc4 21. Bc1 d5 22. exd5 Nxd5 and Black has more active pieces.
    • 20. Ng4 Nxg4 21. Qxg4 Nxa4 22. Bxa4 bxa4 and Black's pieces have more freedom.
18. -- Qc7 19. Bxf6 Nxf6 20. Ng4 Nxg4 21. hxg4?!

  • Better is 21. Qxg4 Bb7 22. Qf3 Be7 23. Bb3 Bg5 24. Rad1 when White has the edge in piece mobility. The text move allows Black to take the initiative.
21. -- Rac8

  • Black takes control of the c-file and puts White on the defensive.
  • 21. -- Rec8 22. a4 Bb7 23. Re3 a5 24. bxa5 Rxa5 also gives Black control of the c-file.
22. Bb3 Bd7 23. Rc1 Be7 24. Ne3!

  • The Knight is headed for d5.
  • Black rebuffs White's attack by 24. c4 Bg5 25. Rc2 Bc6 26. Ng3 Red8 27. Nf5 h6 28. a3 g6 and seizes the initiative.
24. -- Bg5 25. Nd5 Qb8?!

  • Black makes an inferior move, relieving pressure on the c-file.
  • Better is 25. -- Qc6 26. Rc2 then:
    • 26. -- Be6
      • 27. c4 Qb7 28. a3 Rc6 and Black has a little bit better pawn structure and a little more freedom for his pieces.
      • 27. a3 a5 28. c4 axb4 29. axb4 Red8 and Black has a slightly superior pawn structure.
    • 26. -- Qb7 27. c4 bxc4 28. Rxc4 Rxc4 29. Bxc4 Rc8 and has better command of open lines.
    • 26. -- h6 27. c4 Qb7 28. Qe2 bxc4 29. Bxc4 Rc6 =+
26. Rc2 Rc6 27. g3

  • White uses his time to strenghten his position. The move is a prophylaxis against the Bishop moving to f4.
  • If 27. Qe2 a5 when:
    • 28. a4 axb4 29. axb5
      • 29. -- Rcc8 30. Bc4 b3 31. Rb2 White bockades the pawn adn leaves his own c-pawn protected.
      • 29. -- Rc5 30. c4 Qa8 31. Nb6 Qb7 32. Nxd7 Qxd7 33. Ra2 and White has better command of open lines.
    • 28. bxa5 Ra6 29. Nb6 Bc6 30. Bd5 Bxd5 31. Nxd5 andf the game is balanced.
27. -- Qc8 28. f3 Be6 29. Qd3

  • Black has had a small edge since White's inaccurate 21st move, but White has fought back and equalized.
  • If 29. c4 Qb7 30. a3 Rec8 31. Qe2 then:
    • 31. -- Bd8 32. Kg2 Bb6 33. Qd3 Bd4 with chances for both sides.
    • 31. -- a5 32. Kg2 axb4 33. axb4 Bh6 with a level game.
29. -- Bd8 30. Kg2!

  • White's plan is to double the Rooks on the h-file and attack.
30. -- Qb7 31. Rh1 Be7?

  • This move relieves the pressure on the center for no benefit to Black.
  • Correct is 31. -- Bg5 32. c4 bxc4 33. Bxc4 h6 when:
    • 34. a4 Rec8 and Black has command of an open diagonal while White has nothing comparable.
    • 34. f4? is bad for White because after the exchanges 34. -- exf4 35. gxf4 Bxf4 36. Nxf4 Bxc4 37. Rxc4 Rxc4 38. Qxc4 Rxe4 -+


Black: Janis Klovans
!""""""""#
$ + +t+l+%
$+w+ VoOo%
$o+tOv+ +%
$+o+nO + %
$ P +p+p+%
$+bP +pP %
$p+r+ +k+%
$+ + + +r%
/(((((((()

White: Vlastimil Jansa
Position after 31. -- Bd8e7

32. Kf1!

  • This quiet-looking move clears the path for the Rook on c2 to join his comrade on the h-file. The game is now won for White.
  • If 32. c4? Bg5 then Black gets back in the game:
    • 33. a4 bxc4 34. Bxc4 Rec8 35. Rh5 h6 and White's attack is stopped.
    • 33. cxb5 Rxc2+ 34. Bxc2 axb5 35. Rh5 h6 and Black actually has a small edge in piece activity.
32. -- Rec8

  • Black tries to keep the pressure up, but it is of no use.
  • 32. -- Rcc8 33. Rch2 h6 34. Qe3 Bxd5 35. Bxd5 Rxc3 36. Rxh6 and Black must give up his Queen to avoid mate: 26. -- gxh6 37. Qxh6 Bf6 38. Bxb7.
33. Rch2 h6 34. Qe3 Kf8 35. g5 h5

  • If 35. -- Bxg5 36. Qxg5 then:
    • 36. -- Rxc3 37. Rxh6 gxh6
      • 38. Rxh6 Rxf3+ 39. Ke2 Ke8 40. Kxf3 and White contiues to penetrate Black's camp from the kingside.
      • 38. Qxh6+ Ke8 39. Nxc3 Rxc3 40. Bxe6 and the Bishop cannot be taken becuase of a forced mate, for example: 40. fxe6 41. Qxe6+ Qe7 42. Rh8#.
    • 36. -- f6 37. Qg6 Qf7 38. Qh7 Ke8 39. Kg2 and White's heavy pieces on the kingside are dominating the entire position.
    • 36. -- hxg5 37. Rh8#
36. Rxh5 Ke8 37. Rh8+ Kd7 38. Rxc8 Kxc8 39. Rh8+ Kd7

  • 39. -- Bd8 40. a4 bxa4 41. Bxa4 Bxd5 42. exd5 Rb6 43. Be8 and White wins material.
40. g6 fxg6 41. Nxe7 1-0

  • If 41. Nxe7 Kxe7 42. Qg5+ then Black is soon mated:
    • 42. -- Kf7 43. Bxe6+ Kxe6 44. Qxg6+
      • 44. -- Ke7 45. Qxg7+ Ke6 46. Rh6#
      • 44. -- Kd7 45. Qf7#
    • 42. -- Kd7 43. Qd8#
  • Klovans resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:56 AM
Response to Reply #3
7. Areshchenko - Ikonnikov, Isle of Man Open, Port Erin



Alexander Areshchenko
Photo: Schach in Bremen (Germany)

Alexander Areshchenko vs. Vyacheslav Ikonnikov
Isle of Man International Open, Round 5
Port Erin, September 2006

Open Sicilian Game: Kalashnikov Defense


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 e5

  • This defense is named for the inventor of the AK47. That's is perhaps because Kalashnikov sounds like Sveshnikov, a much sharper Sicialian defense that also features an early -- e7e5.
5. Nb5 d6 6. N1c3 a6 7. Na3 Be7 8. Nc4 b5 9. Ne3 Nf6 10. g3

  • An alternative is 10. Ned5 Bb7 11. Bd2 0-0 12. Be3 Rc8 13. Be2 Nxd5 with an even game.
10. -- h5 11. Bg2 h4 12. 0-0 Nd4 13. Ncd5

  • 13. f4 Qb6 14. Qd3 Bb7 15. Rd1 hxg3 16. hxg3 Ne6 17. fxe5 dxe5 yields an unclear position.
13. -- Nxd5 14. exd5 Rb8?

  • This is a waste of time which allows White to expand on the kingside.
  • Better is 14. -- hxg3 15. fxg3 Qb6 16. Kh1 b4 17. Re1 Nf5 18. Nxf5 Bxf5 with an unclear game.
15. g4 h3 16. Be4 b4

  • White has a strong game while Black's king has no safe haven.
  • 16. -- Bb7 17. c3 Ne6 18. dxe6 Bxe4 19. exf7+ Kxf7 20. f4 give White a huge spatial plus on the kingside.
17. c3 bxc3 18. bxc3 Nb5 19. Qd3 Bg5 20. Rb1 Bd7

  • Black tries to overprotect the Knight, but to no avial.
  • Better is 20. -- Bxe3 21. Bxe3 Bxg4 22. f4 when:
    • 22. -- Rf8 23. fxe5 dxe5 24. Bc5 and White threatens to win the exchange.
    • 22. -- Rh5 23. Bg6! and White should make a short game of it.]/li]
21. a4 Nc7

  • Black saves his Knight at the cost of open a line for White to invade.
  • 21. -- Bxe3 22. fxe3 Nc7 23. Rxb8 Qxb8 24. Ba3 Rh6 25. g5! and Black's position is shakey.
22. Rxb8 Qxb8

Black: Vyacheslav Ikonnikov
!""""""""#
$ W +l+ T%
$+ Mv+oO %
$o+ O + +%
$+ +pO V %
$p+ +b+p+%
$+ PqN +o%
$ + + P P%
$+ B +rK %
/(((((((()

White: Alexander Areshchenko
Position after 22. -- Qd8xb8

23. Nc4!

  • White strikes at the pawn that underpins what's left of Black's defense.
  • 23. Nf5 Bxf5 24. Bxf5 Bxc1 25. Rxc1 Qd8 26. Rb1 g6 27. Be4 and White's advantage begins to evaporate
23. -- Bxc1

  • 23. -- Be7 24. f4 exf4 25. Bxf4 Qa7+ 26. Kh1 Bxa4 27. Bxd6 and White threatens to exchange Bishops and win the Knight.
24. Rxc1 Ke7 25. Re1?

  • This is an inferior move that throws away White's advantage.
  • Much better is 25. Rb1 Qc8 26. Nxd6 Kxd6 27. Rb6+ Ke7 28. d6+ and White wins.
25. -- Qd8?

  • Black returns the gift.
  • Correct is 25. -- Ne8 26. Ne3 Qb6 27. Nf5+ Bxf5 28. Bxf5 Qa5 29, f4and White's spatial plus on the kingside doesn't count for much.
26. Nxd6 Rh4

  • If 26. -- Kxd6 then:
    • 27. Bf3! Qg5 28. Qb1 Bc8 29. Qb6+ Kd7 30. d6 and White threatens to put the game away starting with 31. Qc6+.
    • 27. c4? Bxg4 28. c5+ Kd7 29. d6 Ne6 30. Qxa6 and the game is level.


Black: Vyacheslav Ikonnikov
!""""""""#
$ + W + +%
$+ MvLoO %
$o+ N + +%
$+ +p+ + %
$p+ +b+pT%
$+ Pq+ +o%
$ + + P P%
$+ + R K %
/(((((((()

White: Alexander Areshchenko
Position after 26. -- Rh8h4

27. Nb7!

  • White must now win a piece.
  • The text is better than 27. Nf5+ Bxf5 28. Bxf5 Qxd5 29. Qxd5 Nxd5 30. c4 which still leaves White in a strong position with an extra pawn.
27. -- Rxg4+ 28. Kf1 Qc8 29. d6+

  • The Knight cannot be saved. Ikonnikov could have resigned here.
29. -- Kf8 30. dxc7 Qxc7 31. Nc5 Bc8

  • The text is no worse than any other move.
  • 31. -- Be8 32. Qxh3 Rf4 33. Qe3 Rh4 34. Kg1 Qd6 35. Bg2 and White retains his extra piece.
  • 31. -- Qxc5 32. Qxd7 Qc4+ 33. Bd3 and White's extra piece shows its strength.
32. Nxa6 Bxa6 33. Qxa6 g6 34. Qc6 1-0

  • 34. Qc6 Qxc6 35. Bxc6 Rc4 36. Bb5 Rxc3 37. Rxe5 and wins easily.
  • Ikonnikov resigns.


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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Oct-08-06 11:58 AM
Response to Reply #3
8. Phtz - Fraser-Mitchell, Isle of Man Open, Port Erin



Elli Phtz
Photo: Rochade Kuppenheim (Germany)

Elli Phtz vs. Jeremy Fraser-Mitchell
Isle of Man International Open, Round 1
Port Erin, September 2006

French Advance Game: Tarrasch Opening


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Ndf3 Nc6 7. Ne2 Qb6 8. c3 Be7 9. a3 a5 10. f5 cxd4

  • The players have begun with an game satisfactory to both sides. The game is level after 10 moves.
  • 10. -- exf5 11. Nf4 cxd4 12. Nxd5 Qd8 13. cxd4 h6 14. Bb5 gives White a small edge in piece activity.
11. cxd4 Qd8

  • White has an advantage in central space.
  • 11. -- 0-0 12. Nf4 Ndb8 13. g3 Na6 14. fxe6 fxe6 15. Bh3 Nc7 is balanced.
12. fxe6 fxe6 13. Nf4 Nb6?

  • The text is an artificial move that does nothing to solve Black's problems.
  • Better is 13. -- Ndb8 14. Bd3 when:
    • 14. -- Qb6 15. Qc2 g6 16. Be3 Bd7 17. 0=0 and White would have only a small advantage in space.
    • 14. -- g5 15. Nh5
      • 15. -- g4 16. Nd2 Nxd4 17. Qxg4 and White has an advantage in developmet and piece activity.
      • 15. -- 0-0? 16. Qc2 Rf7 and White wins after 17. Bg6! Rf5 18. Bxh7!! Kxh7 19. g4.
14. Bd3 0-0 15. Qc2!

  • The text is better than 15. 0-0? Rf7 16. Qc2 g5 17. Nh3 g4 18. Nfg5 then:
    • 18. -- Rf5 19. Bxf5 exf5 with equality.
    • 18. -- Bxg5? gives White a second chance to nail it down: 19. Rxf7 Kxf7 20. Bxg5 and the h-pawn falls with White able to attack at will.
15. -- g6

Black: Jeremy Fraser-Mitchell
!""""""""#
$t+vW Tl+%
$+o+ V +o%
$ Mm+o+o+%
$O +oP + %
$ + P N +%
$P +b+n+ %
$ Pq+ +pP%
$R B K +r%
/(((((((()

White: Elli Phtz
Position after 15. -- g7g6

16. Bxg6!!

  • By sacrificing her Bishop, White rips open the castle walls and jumps all over the exposed King.
  • The text is not only the most beautiful way to win, but probably the only way: 16. Be3?! Qe8 17. 0-0 Bd7 18. Rac1 Rc8 19. Qf2 Nb8 20. Qg3 give Black the opportunity to exchanges pieces and thus take the sting out of White's threats.
16. -- hxg6 17. Qxg6+ Kh8 18. Nh5

  • Also good is 18. Qh6+ Kg8 19. Nh5 Kf7 20. Ng5+ Ke8 21. Qg6+
18. -- Bh4+ 19. g3 Qe7 20. Qh6+ Kg8 21. gxh4 Rxf3

  • Black falls on his sword. There is nothing better.
  • 21. -- Kf7 22. Nf6 Qxf6 23. exf6 Ke8 24. Qg6+ would avoid mate, but Black is lost in any event.
22. Rg1+ Kf7 23. Qg6+ Kf8 24. Qg8# 1-0

  • Frln. Phtz says that she is an intuitive player. Like Tal and his followers.


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