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The Jack Rabbit Chess Report for August 20: Rowson wins British Champ

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:11 AM
Original message
The Jack Rabbit Chess Report for August 20: Rowson wins British Champ
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 09:15 AM by Jack Rabbit

The Jack Rabbit Chess Report
for the week ending August 20




Contents

Post 1: News for the week
Post 2: Games from Current and Recent Events


Death and the Knight playing chess from the motion picture The Seventh Seal by Ingmar Bergman (1958)
from Grow-a-Brain

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:12 AM
Response to Original message
1. News for the week ending August 20


Jonathan Rowson wins third straight British Championship;
Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant is runner-up




Jonathan Rowson of Scotland won his third third straight British championship in Swansea, Wales Friday by defeating Jonathan Parker of England with Black in 40 moves

Rowson scored 8 points in eleven rounds.

Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant, also of Scotland, is the runner-up with 8 points. She defeated Nicholas Pert in the final round to secure second place. She is entitled to call herself the British women's champion, and her solid performance in Swansea makes that all the more worthy.

This is the first time a woman has finished as high as second in the 93-year history of the event.



Jonathan Rowson and Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant
Photos: Gambit Books, ChessBase.com

Rowson and Parker entered the final round of the Swiss system tournament with 7 points each. They were trailed by Pert and Ms. Arakhamia-Grant, who had 7 points a piece.

Mr. Rowson will soon return to Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he is Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University. He has a degree in politics, philosophy and economics from Oxford. He is a respected chess author and reviews books for the Dutch magazine, New in Chess.

Ms. Arakhamia-Grant is a former national champion of Scotland (2003) and is married to Jonathan Grant, the present Scottish titleholder. She was born in the Caucasus nation of Georgia, then part of the Soviet Union.

Sixty-two players competed in the event.


Shulman wins US Open

Yury Shulman, orignally from Minsk, Belarus and now a resident of Chicago, won the US open in Chicago last week with 8 points in nine rounds.



Yury Shulman
Photo: University of Texas at Dallas

In spite of the impressive score, Shulman did not clinch the title until the last round as ten players finished tied for second with 7 points, including 15-year-old international master Emilio Crdova of Peru and the as-yet untitled Michael Aigner of California (who, incidently, once belonged to the same chess club to which I now belong).

The others who finished with 7 points were Gregory Kaidanov of Kentucky, Zviad Izoria of the Republic of Georgia, Alex Shabalov of Pennsylvania, Giorgi Kachiesvili of New York, Joel Benjamin of New Jersey, Dmitri Gurevich of Illinois, John Fedorowicz of New York, and international master Alfonso Almeida of Mexico.

Young Crdova chalked up his second grandmaster norm for his efforts. He needs one more to gain the title.

Shulman was the runner up to Alex Onischuk at the US Championship in San Diego earlier this year. He runs a chess school in the Chicago area.


Eljanov and Huzman win in Montreal

Ukrainian grandmaster Pavel Eljanov won the category 15 international tournament in Montreal earlier this week with 6 points in nine rounds.

Kamil Miton of Poland was second with 6 points. Emil Sutovsky of Israel and Artyom Timofeev of Russia finishe tied for third with 5 points each.

International Category 15 Tournament
Montreal
Unofficial Cross Table

------------------------- 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 T--(W)
.1 Pavel Eljanov . . . . .- 1 1 1 1 6 (4)
.2 Kamil Miton . . . . . . - 0 1 1 1 1 6. (4)
.3 Emil Sutovsky . . . . . 1 - 1 0 5. (2)
.4 Artyom Timofeev . . . . - x 1 1 5. (2)
.5 Boris Gulko . . . . . . 0 0 - 1 1 4 (2)
.6 Alex Onischuk . . . . .0 0 - 1 4. (1)
.7 Ildar Ibragimov . . . .0 0 x 0 - 1 3 (1)
.8 Oleg Korneev. . . . . . 1 0 0 - 0 3 (1)
.9 Victor Mikhalevski. . .0 0 - 3 (0)
10 Pascal Charbonneau. . .0 0 0 0 1 - 3. (1)

The Jack Rabbit Unofficial Cross Table uses games won as first tie break

The top four finishers were nip and tuck for much of the tournament, trading and sharing first place until the last rounds when Eljanov started to pull away.

Three American grandmasters in the event did not fare so well. Boris Gulko, 59, the only person ever to be both Soviet and US champion, finished even with 4 points; Alex Onischuk, the reigning US champion, finished with 4 points; and Ildar Ibragimov with 3.

The only Canadian in the tournament was Pascal Charbonneau, who finished with 3 points out of nine. Charbonneau scored the biggest upset in the Torino Olympiad in June when he defeated Vishy Anand of India, ranked second in the world, in the 12th round.


Pavel Eljanov and Alexander Huzman
Photos: Indochess, ChessBase.com (Spanish language edition)

In a category 9 tournament held simutaneously, Israeli grandmaster Alexander Huzman finished on top with 6 points with international master Tomas Krnan of Ontario and grandmaster Walter Arencibia of Cuba tied for second with 5 each.

International Category 9 Tournament
Montreal
Unofficial Cross Table

------------------------- 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 T--(W)
.1 Alexander Huzman. . . .- 1 1 1 6 (4)
.2 Tomas Krnan . . . . . .0 - 1 1 0 1 1 5 (4)
.3 Walter Arencibia. . . .0 - 1 1 1 1 5 (3)
.4 Tomas Likavsky. . . . .0 0 - 0 1 1 1 1 5. (4)
.5 Irina Krush . . . . . . 0 1 - 0 1 4 (2)
.6 Nikola Mitkov . . . . . 0 0 1 - 1 4 (2)
.7 Thomas Roussel Roozmon 0 0 - 1 1 4 (2)
.8 Eric Lawson . . . . . .0 0 0 0 - 1 1 3 (2)
.9 Sylvain Barbeau . . . . 0 0 0 - 1 3 (1)
10 Nikolay Noritsyn. . . . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 (0)

The Jack Rabbit Unofficial Cross Table uses games won as first tie break

Krnan needed a win in his last round game against Irina Krush of the United States in order to gain a grandmaster norm; however, Ms. Krush held him to a draw.

Ms. Krush was the only American in the category 9 event. She finished even with 4 points out of nine.


Howard Staunton Memorial Tournament begins in London



The fourth annual Howard Staunton Memorial Tournament is being played in London.

Twelve players from three nations are competing in the event this year: from Britain, grandmasters Michael Adams, Jonathan Speelman and Jonathan Levitt and international masters David Howell and Peter Wells; from Holland, grandmasters Ivan Sokolov, Jan Timman, Erwin L'Ami, Jan Werle, Yge Visser and international master Tea Boosboom-Lanchava; and international master Lawrence Day of Canada.

After six rounds, Sokolov is on top with 5 points followed by Adams, Timman and Werle with 4 each.

The event is being played at two venues. The first six games will be played at the historic Simpson's Grand Divan Tavern and the remaining five games at Wellington College, which will also be the site of the NATO champiohships beginning tomorrow.



Simpson's Grand Divan
Photo: Savoy Group

Simpson's Divan has been a famous chess parlor since the middle of the nineteenth century and has been the scene of many noted chess games, including the gem known as the Immortal Game won by Adolf Anderssen over Lionel Kieseritzky in 1851.




Adolf Anderssen
Image: SchachForum (Germany)

Adolf Anderssen vs. Lionel Kieseritzky
Played at Simpson's Divan
London, July 1851

King's Gambit: Italian Opening (Bryan Counter-Gambit)


1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Bc4 Qh4+ 4. Kf1 b5?!

The Bryan Gambit was very common at the time, but nowadays it is thought nothing better than the waste of a pawn. Better is 4. -- Nf6 5. Nf3 Qh6 6. Ne5.

5. Bxb5 Nf6 6. Nf3 Qh6 7. d3

If 7. Nc3 Bb4 8. e5 Ng4 9. Nd5 Ba5 then:
  • 10. Bc4 c6 11. Nc3 Bc7 12. d4 0-0 13. Qd3 with equality.
  • 10. Nd4 Qh4 11. Qe2 Nxh2+ 12. Kg1 f3 13. Nxf3 Nxf3+ 14. Qxf3 and Black will have an easier time completing development.
7. -- Nh5 8. Nh4 Qg5 9. Nf5 c6 10. g4 Nf6 11. Rg1 cxb5 12. h4 Qg6 13. h5 Qg5 14. Qf3

White threatens 15. Bxf4.

14. -- Ng8?

Correct is 14. -- d5 15. Bxf4 Nxg4 16. Qxg4 Qxg4 17. Rxg4 with a level game.

15. Bxf4 Qf6 16. Nc3 Bc5

White has a superior game after either 16. -- Na6 17. g5 Qc6 18. Be5 f6 19. gxf6 gxf6 20. Nd4 or 16. -- Bb7 17. Qg3 Na6 18. Be5 Qg5 Nxb5.

17. Nd5 Qxb2

Black has nothing better than to take the proffered Rooks and wait for his doom.

17. -- Qc6 18. Nc7+ Kd8 19. Nxa8 Qxa8 20. d4 Bf8 21. Qb3 is a hopeless as the text.

18. Bd6!

White already sees the winning combination.

18. -- Bxg1

Black: Kieseritzky
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White: Anderssen
Position after Black's 18th move

19. e5!!

Now the Black Queen's is unable to come to the aid of the defense.

19. -- Qxa1+ 20. Ke2 Na6

Black avoids the Knight fork that would win the Rook, but he's got bigger problems.

21. Nxg7+ Kd8 22. Qf6+ Nxf6 23. Be7# 1-0

The tournament is named for one of Anderssen's contemporaries, a Shakespearean scholar who was regrded as the world's strongest chess player from the 1840s until 1851, when Anderssen won the world's first major international tournament, which was held in London and organized by Staunton. During the course of that tournament, Anderssen, a mathematics professor from Breslau, Germany, faced and defeated Staunton.

Staunton's name is also lent to the general design of chessmen most commonly in use today. Stauton commissioned the design for the 1851 London Tournament. The set was designed by Nathaniel Cook and manufactured by Cook's brother-in-law, John Jacques. The firm of John Jacques of London still makes fine chess sets.


French Championships begin in Besanon



The French Championships are underway in Besanon.

The main tournament consists of ten grandmasters and two international masters led by top seeded GMs Joel Lautier, Vladislav Tkachiev and Laurent Fressinet. Others competing include Christian Bauer, Igor Nataf, Andrei Sokolov and Josif Dorfman. After six rounds, Fressinet is in first place with 5 points trailed by Tkachiev with 4 and Robert Fontaine with 4. In the fourth round Thursday, Fontaine scored an upset win over Lautier, who is currently in fourth place with with 3 points.

The women's event, also with twelve participants, is headed by grandmaster Almira Skripchenko and WGM Maria Laconte. After five rounds, Mlle. Skripchenko leads with 5 points, followed by Pauline Guichard with 5 and Mlle. Laconte with 4.



Besanon
Photo: France.com gallery archive

Besanon is in eastern France in Franche-Comt province near the border with Switzerland. It is the birthplace of Victor Hugo.


Chess Classic opens in Mainz



The annual Mainz Chess Classic began Wednesday in Germany.

Much of the tournament is taken up with FischeRandom Chess and rapid chess.

Many grandmasters and strong international masters are participating in a FischeRandom tournament including Alexandra Kosteniuk, Pentala Harikrishna, Vlastimil Hort, Alexander Morozevich and Dutch women's champion Peng Zhaoqin.

A rapid chess match will take place in Mainz between grandmasters Teimour Radjabov and Vishy Anand, who is renoned for his prowess in rapid chess as he is in chess with a traditional time control. After six rounds in three days, each player has three points.


Acropolis Open starts in Athens



The Acropolis Open takes place in Athens from August 13 through 21.

There are two simultaneous tournaments, one general the other a women's tournament. Several women are competing in the general tournament, including grandmasters Zhu Chen of Qatar and Antoaneta Stefanova of Bulgaria, both former women's world champions.



Zhu Chen
Photo: Muzi

Currently, through seven rounds, grandmaster Fernando Peralta of Argentina is in first with 6 points, followed by Ms. Zhu and Moldavian grandmaster Dmitry Svetushkin with 5 points each.

Today's action will pit Ms. Zhu against el seor Peralta, with Peralta playing White. The round begins at 17:00 in Athens (7 am PDT) and is broadcast from the official tournament website (click on the blue Live Games tab on the upper right).

Ms. Zhu's husband, Qatari grandmaster Mohammad al-Modiakhi, is also competing in the tournament. After seven rounds, he has 4 points.

In the women's tournament, 19-year-old Georgian WGM Salome Melia leads with 6 points over a WGM from Greece, Marina Makropoulou, top seeded Elina Danielian of Armenia and Slovenian WIM Jana Krivec, each with 5 points.

There are 68 participants in the open tournament and 34 in the women's event.


Abu Dhabi Open begins



The 16th annual Abu Dhabi Chess Festival, the premier annual chess event in the Middle East, takes place this year from August 12 through 21 in the United Arab Emirites.

Three open tournaments are being held: a master open; an open tournament for lower ranked players; and one for children under 12 years of age.

Vugar Gashimov of Azerbaijan leads the master section with 5 points after seven rounds, with four players trailing with 5 points each.

There are 64 participants in the Open Master Tournament.



Scheveningen Tournament in Amsterdam pits old age against youth




A Scheveningen tournament started yesterday in Amsterdam pitting a team of five rising stars against five older players.

The rising star team consists of Norwegian Magnus Carlsen (15 years old), Sergey Karjakin of Ukraine (16), China's Wang Hao (17), and Dutch GMs Daniel Stellwagen (19) and Jan Smeets (21).

The old timers are Ljubomir Ljubojevic of Serbia (56), Sweden's Ulf Andersson (55), Slovenian GM Alexander Beliavsky (52), Englishman John Nunn (51) and Artur Yusupov (also spelled Jassupow) of Germany, at 46 the baby of the team.

In the first round, played yesterday, old age and treachery triumphed over youth and exuberance with two victories and three draws. The decisive games saw Yusupov defeat Stellwagen and Beliavsky defeat Smeets. All the players on the senior squad played Black in the first round.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:14 AM
Response to Original message
2. Games from Current and Recent Events
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 10:10 AM by Jack Rabbit

Boris Gelfand vs. Levon Aronian, Sparkassen Chess Meeting, Dortmund, Round 7
Yannick Pelletier vs. Andrei Volokitin, International Grandmasters' Tournament, Biel, Round 10
Mikhail Gurevich vs. Michal Krasenkow, Zeeland Open, Vlissingen, Holland, Round 9
Alex Shabalov vs. Giorgi Kacheishvili, US Open, Chicago, Round 7
Yury Shulman vs. Alex Shabalov, US Open, Chicago, Round 8
Irina Krush vs. Nikolay Noritsyn, International Cat 9 Tournament, Montreal, Round 2
Ivan Sokolov vs. Lawrence Day, Staunton Memorial Tournament, London, Round 1




!""""""""#
$tMvWlVmT%
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White to move
This position is a theoretical draw

Does this picture make sense to you? If not, or if it looks like a bunch of Wingdings, please click here.

Diagrams used in the Jack Rabbit Chess Report are made with Chess Merida, a true type font that is available as freeware at the above site.


The JR chess report puts the main variation in annotations more distinct by putting it in red. A secondary variation, if be in blue and other colors used if needed.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:17 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. Gelfand-Aronian, Sparkassen Chess Meeting, Dortmund
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 09:42 AM by Jack Rabbit



Boris Gelfand
Photo: CorusChess.com (Holland)

Boris Gelfand vs. Levon Aronian
Sparkassen Chess Meeting, Round 7
Dortmund, August 2006

East India Game: Queen's Indian Defense


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Ba6 5. Qc2 Bb7 6. Bg2 c5 7. d5 exd5 8. cxd5 Bxd5

Steinitz said "A pawn is worth a little trouble." Black has won a pawn in the opening, but it will prove to be a great deal of trouble.

9. Nc3 Bc6 10. e4 Be7

If 10. -- d5?! then 11. exd5 Nxd5 12. 0-0 Nd7 13. Nxd5 Bxd5 14. Bf4 Be7 15. Rad1 Be6 16. Ne5 and Black is in deep trouble.

11. Bf4 0-0 12. 0-0-0!?

This gets the King out of the center and sets a Rook on an open file against Black's weak extra pawn.

White would have a strong game after 12. 0-0 d5 13. exd5 Nxd5 14. Rad1 Nb4 15. Qe2 Qe8 16. Bxb8 Rxb8 17. a3 and the attacked Knight has no good place to retreat.

12. -- Na6 13. Qe2

If 13. Ne5 Qe8 14. Nxc6 dxc6 then:
  • 15. e5?! Nb4
    • 16. Qb3 Ng4 17. Ne4 Bd8 18. h3 Nxe5 19. Nd6 Qe7 20. a3 and White has compesation for Black's two extra pawns in control of open lines and the Knight at d6.
    • 16. Qf5 Nfd5 17. Nxd5 cxd5 18. a3 Nc6 and the position is even in spite of Black's extra pawn.
  • 15. Qe2 15. -- Nb4 16. a3 a5 17. axb4 axb4 18. Nb1 gives White a strong plus in space.
13. -- Nb4

If 13. -- Nc7 14. Ne5 Bb7 then:
  • 15. h4 Ne6 16. Be3 d6 17. f4 Qb8 18. Nc4 and Black's extra pawn, backward and under attack, is worthless.
  • 15. Qd3 d6 16. Nc4 Ba6 17. Qe2 Rb8 18. e5 Bxc4 19. Qxc4 with equality.
14. a3 Qc8 15. Kb1

After 15. Bg5 h6 16. Bxf6 Bxf6 17. e5 Bg5+ 18. Kb1 Na6 19. h4 Be7, Black retains his extra pawn, but it is completely restrained and hindering his development.

15. -- a5 16. Ne5 Re8

If 16. -- Na6 17. f3 Qb7 then:
  • 18. g4 b5 19. Nxc6 dxc6 20. Na2 and White's pieces are better placed.
  • 18. Qd3? would be a terrible move: 18. -- b5 19. Nxb5 Bxb5 20. Qc2 d5 and Black is a piece up.
17. Rhe1 Bf8 18. g4 g6 19. Bg3 Re6?

19. -- d6 20. Nxc6 Nxc6 21. g5 Nh5 22. Nb5 Nxg3 23. hxg3 Qd7 24. f4 is level.

20. f4 d6 21. Nxc6 Nxc6 22. Nb5 Ne8

22. -- d5 23. e5 Re8 24. h3 Ne4 25. Bh4 g5 26. Bxe4 dxe4 27. Bxg5 gives White a huge advatage in space and piece mobility.

23. e5!?

23. f5 Re7 24. h4 Bg7 25. Nxd6 Nxd6 26. Bxd6 Re8 27. Qb5 leaves White in a dominate position.

23. -- dxe5 24. Bd5 a4

Two alternatives also yield White a strong position:
  • 24. -- Bg7 25. fxe5 Rb8 26. Nd6 Nxd6 27. Bxe6 Qxe6 28. exd6 and the passed pawn is menacing.
  • 24. -- Re7 25. Qf3 Na7 26. Rxe5 Nxb5 27. Rxe7 Bxe7 28. Bxa8 Nd4 29. Qe3 yields White a Rook against a minor piece and a pawn.
25. fxe5 Ng7

If 25. -- Ra5! then:
  • 26. Nd6 Qd7
    • 27. Bxe6?! Qxe6 28. Qc4
      • 28. -- Ng7
        • 29. h4! b5 30. Qxc5 Qxg4 31. Qxc6 Qxg3 32. Qb7 Qf2 33. Rf1 Qa7 34. Nxf7
          • 34. -- Nf5 35. Nh6+ Bxh6 36. Qd5+ and White controls everything that is important.
          • 34. -- Qxb7 35. Nh6+ Kh8 36. Rxf8#
        • 29. Rf1 29. -- Ra7 30. Qe4 Nd4 31. Rf6 Qb3 32. Rdf1 and White has a strong initiative.
      • 28. -- Nc7 29. Rf1 Nd8 30. Qxe6 Ncxe6 31. Nc4 and there is nothing to stop White from putting his Rook on the seventh rank.
    • 27. Qf2 27. -- Nxd6 28. Bxe6 Qxe6 29. exd6 Qd7 30. h3 and White's control of open lines should win.
  • 26. Bxe6?! Qxe6 27. Nd6 Nd4 28. Qc4 Qxc4 29. Nxc4 Ra6 and White's advantage is much diminished.
26. Qf3 Rb8 27. Nd6 Bxd6

If 27. -- Qc7 28. Bxc6 then:
  • 28. -- h6 29. Bd5 b5 30. g5
    • 30. -- h5 31. Rf1 b4 32. Nxf7 bxa3 33. Bxe6 Nxe6 34. Qf6 Ng7 35. e6 and the e-pawn is dangerous.
    • 30. -- b4 31. gxh6 bxa3 32. Nxf7 Rxb2+ 33. Ka1 Qb8 34. Qxa3 Rb3 35. Bxb3 Qxb3 36. Qxb3 axb3 37. hxg7 and White's advantage is clear.
  • 28. -- b5 29. Bd5 b4 30. axb4 cxb4 31. Rf1
    • 31. -- a3 32. Nxf7 Qe7 33. Nh6+ Kh8 34. Bh4 and White will take the Rook if Black takes the Bishop.
    • 31. -- Qe7 32. Bh4 Qc7 33. Nxf7 h6 34. Nd8 White threatens or 35. Qxf8+
28. exd6 Nd4

28. -- Rxe1 29. Qxf7+ Kh8 30. Rxe1 Rb7 31. Qf6 Qd8 32. g5 leaves Black with no defense against multiple threats.

Black: Levon Aronian
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White: Boris Gelfand
Position after Black's 28th move

29. Rxd4!

The exchange sacrifice eliminates Black's most active piece and brings the win home.

29. -- Rxe1+ 30. Bxe1 cxd4 31. Qxf7+ Kh8 32. d7 Qc5

Black is hopeless: 32. -- Qf8 33. Qxf8+ Rxf8 34. Bh4 b5 35. d8Q Rxd8 36. Bxd8 and White has won a piece.

33. Bb4 1-0

Black must either lose his Queen or submit to mate (the short version, without giving away too much material, is 33. -- Qb5 34. Bf8 Ne6 35. Qf6+ Ng7 36. Bxg7#). Aronian resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:18 AM
Response to Reply #2
4. Pelletier-Volokitin, International Grandmasters' Tournament, Biel
Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 09:43 AM by Jack Rabbit



Yannick Pelletier
Photo: ChessBase.de (Germany)

Yannick Pelletier vs. Andrei Volokitin
International Grandmasters' Tournament, Round 10
Biel, August 2006

East India Game: Nimzo-Indian Defense


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 0-0 5. Bd3 c5 6. Nf3 d5 7. 0-0 Nc6 8. a3 Bxc3 9. bxc3 dxc4 10. Bxc4 Qc7 11. Bb2

Another satisfactory opening line is 11. Qc2 Rd8 12. Rb1 b6 13. Bb2 Bb7 14. Bd3 Na5 15. Nd2 Nc6 16. Ne4 with equality.

11. -- e5 12. h3 b6 13. Ba2 Ba6 14. Re1 e4 15. Nd2 Rad8 16. f3

If 16. Qa4 Bb7 17. Rad1 a6 then:
  • 18. dxc5 b5 19. Qb3 Na5 20. Qc2 Qxc5 21. c4 Nxc4
    • 22. Bxf6 gxf6 23. a4 and a slight advantage for White
    • 22. Bxc4 bxc4 23. Bxf6 gxf6 24. Qxc4 and equality
  • 18. Bb1
    • 18. -- b5 19. Qc2 Rfe8 20. a4 c4 21. axb5 axb5 22. Ba3 and White has an advantage in pawn structure, but Black has a bit more space.
    • 18. -- Qe7 19. Qb3 b5 20. dxc5 Na5 21. Qc2 Qxc5 and an equal game.
16. -- exf3 17. Qxf3 Ne5

17. -- Bb7 18. Qf2 Qd7 19. Rad1 Rfe8 20. e4 cxd4 21. cxd4 is level.

18. dxe5 Rxd2 19. exf6 Rxb2

19. -- c4? would give White serious chances at an early win after 20. fxg7 Rfd8 21. Bc1 R2d6 22. e4 Qe7 23. Be3 with White having control of open lines leading to Black's exposed King.

20. Qg4 g6 21. Qg5 Rd8?

Seizing an open file is a good idea, but King safety is a better one.

The correct move is 21. -- Kh8! and now:
  • 22. Bd5 22. -- Re8 23. e4 Rc2 24. Qh6 Rg8 25. Rec1 Re2 with a level game.
  • 22. Qh6?! Rg8
    • 23. Qg5 Bb7 24. e4 c4 25. Qe3 Re8
      • 26. Qh6 Qc5+ 27. Kh1 Rg8 28. Qe3 Qxe3 29. Rxe3 b5 and Black is better on the queenside
      • 26. Re2? Rxe2 27. Qxe2 Rxe4 and Black has a strong position and can launch an attack on the White King.
    • 23. Qf4 Qc6 24. e4 c4 25. Red1 Re8 26. Rd6 Qc5+ 27. Rd4 Rc2 and the c-pawn is doomed and with it White's outpost at d4
    • 23. Bd5 23. -- Qe5 and Black controls open lines.


    Black: Andrei Volokitin
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    White: Yannick Pelletier
    Position after Black's 21st move

    22. Red1!

    The Rook is activated for the final assault.

    If now 22. -- Rxd1+ 23. Rxd1 Rxa2 then:
    • 24. e4 Ra1 25. Rxa1 Qd8 26. e5 Bc4 27. Qh6 and White has many more options than Black.
    • 24. Qh6? would throw it away: 24. -- Rxg2+ 25. Kxg2 Qc6+ 26. Kg3 Qxf6 and the game is level.
    22. -- Bb7 23. Qe5 Rxg2+ 24. Kf1 Qb8 25. Bxf7+! Kh8

    If 25. -- Kxf7 then 26. Qe7+ Kg8 27. Qg7#. Finite.

    26. Rxd8+ Qxd8 27. Bd5!

    White can also win with 27. Bc4 h6 28. Qe7 Qxe7 29. fxe7 Bc6 30. Bd5.

    27. -- Rg5

    27. -- Qxd5 28. Qxd5 Bxd5 29. Rd1 Rg5 30. e4 Bc4+ 31. Kf2 Kg8 32. Rd7 is hopeless for Black.

    28. Qxg5 Bxd5 29. Rd1 Bc4+ 30. Ke1 Qb8/1-0

    If 30. -- Qb8 31. f7 Kg7 32. Rd8 then the pawn queens.

    Had Black played 30. -- Qc7 then 31. e4 b5 32. Qg4 a6 33. Rd2 a5 34. Rd7 h5 35. Rxc7 hxg4 36. hxg4 and White would choose btween a plan of advancing his own pawns or one of picking off Black's.

    Volokitin resigned without waiting for Pelletier's reply.

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    Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:21 AM
    Response to Reply #2
    5. M. Gurevich-Krasenkow, Zeeland Open, Vlissingen



    Michal Krasenkow
    Photo: ChessBase.com

    Mikhail Gurevich vs. Michal Krasenkow
    Zeeland Open, Round 9
    Vlissingen, Holland, August 2006

    Queen's Gambit: Semi-Slav Defense (Tolush Variation)


    1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c6 4. e4 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Bb4+ 6. Bd2?!

    This loses a pawn. Satisfactory is 6. Nc3 Nf6 7. Qb3 Qa5 8. Bd2 0-0 9. a3 Bxc3 10. Bxc3 Qf5 11. Nf3 with an equal game.

    6. -- Qxd4 7. Bxb4 Qxe4+ 8. Be2?!

    If 8. Qe2?! then Black keeps the extra pawn:
    • 8. -- Qxe2+ 9. Bxe2 Nf6 10. Rd1 Nbd7
      • 11. Nf3 a5
      • 11. Bf3 Ne5 12. Be2 Ng6 13. Bc3
    • 8. -- Nf6 9. Rd1 Nbd7 10. Qxe4 Nxe4 11. Bd3 a5 12. Ba3 Nec5
    8. -- Na6 9. Bd6 b6?!

    This squanders a great deal of White's early advatange.

    Better is 9. -- Qxg2! 10. Bf3 Qg5, which would drive home Black's advantage early:
    • 11. Qd4 Nf6 12. Ne2 Qa5+
      • 13. Qc3 Qxc3+ 14. Nxc3 Bd7 15. Rg1 Rg8
      • 13. Nc3 Qf5 14. Qe3 Rg8 15. Rd1 Bd7
    • 11. Ne2 11. -- Qa5+ 12. Nc3 Ne7 13. Bxe7 Kxe7 14. Qd4 e5
    As it stands in the game, Black's extra pawn gives him a clear advantage.

    10. Nf3 Bb7 11. 0-0 Rd8 12. Bd3 Qg4 13. h3 Qh5 14. Bc2

    If 14. Be2 Ne7 then:
    • 15. b3 Qh6 16. b4 e5
      • 17. Qa4 Rxd6 18. c5 b5 19. Qa5 Rd5 20. a4
        • 20. -- e4 21. axb5 Nxc5 22. Qxa7 Nc8 23. Qb8 Qd6 24. Qxd6 Nxd6 and Black has won a piece.
        • 20. -- Ng6 21. axb5 Nf4 22. Bc4 Qg6 23. Nh4 Nxh3+ and Black has a strong initiative
      • 17. c5 bxc5 18. bxc5 Nxc5 19. Bxc5 Rxd1 20. Rfxd1 Qf4 21. Rab1 Bc8 and Black has for the time being two extra pawns.
    • 15. Ne5 Qh6 16. Bh5 g6 17. Qf3 Qg7 18. Bxe7 Kxe7 19. Qa3+ Ke8 20. Qg3 f6 21. Nd3 Rxd3 22. Qxd3 gxh5 and Black has an extra pawn and is whipping up a mating threat on the g-file.
    14. -- Ne7 15. Qd4?

    White should try to break the pin in the d-file.

    15. Ne5 Qh4 16. Qf3 Qf6 17. Bxe7 Kxe7 18. Qg3 c5 19. Rad1 is level.

    15. -- Nb4!

    Taking advantage of the pin to attack the hanging Bishop and gain time for the final assault.

    16. Rad1

    Other moves (listed without preference) also leave Black with a strong advantage:
    • 16. Be4 c5 17. Qxg7 Rg8 18. Qf6 Rxd6 19. Bxb7 Qxh3 and avoiding mate will not come free of charge.
    • 16. Qc3 Nxc2 17. Bxe7 Kxe7 18. Qxc2 c5 and Black will exploit the outpost at d4.
    • 16. Qxg7 Rg8 17. Qxh7 Qxf3 18. Qxg8+ Nxg8 19. gxf3 Rxd6
    • and Black's superior piece placement gives him a strong position.
    • 16. Bb3 Nf5 17. Qc3 Nxd6 18. Qxb4
      • 18. -- 0-0 19. c5 Qxc5 20. Qxc5 bxc5 White is two pawns down with few options.
      • 18. -- c5? lets White out: 19. Qa4+ b5 20. cxb5 Bxf3 21. gxf3 c4 22. Bxc4 with a level game.
    16. -- Nxc2 17. Qxg7 Rg8 18. Qf6 Rxd6 19. Rxd6

    Black: Michal Krasenkow
    !""""""""#
    $ + +l+t+%
    $Ov+ Mo+o%
    $ OoRoQ +%
    $+ + + +w%
    $ +p+ + +%
    $+ + +n+p%
    $pPm+ Pp+%
    $+ + +rK %
    /(((((((()

    White: Mikhail Gurevich
    Position after White's 19th move

    19. -- c5!

    Black opens up the long diagonal in order to focus on the King position. The game is now won for Black.

    Other moves are inferior. If 19. -- Qg6 20. Qxg6 Nxg6 21. Rd2 c5 22. Rxc2 Nf4 then:
    • 23. Rc3 Ne2+ 24. Kh2 Nxc3 25. bxc3 and Black is still strong, but not clearly winning
    • 23. g3? is bad for White: 23. -- Bxf3 24. Kh2 Ne2 25. Re1 Nd4 and Black's two active minor pieces trump either of the White Rooks.
    20. Rfd1 Nd4 21. R1xd4 cxd4 22. Qxd4 Nc6 23. 0-1

    Black is a piece up after either 23. Qd3 Qxh3 24. Ne1 Qh4 or 23. Qf4 e5 24. Rh6 exf4 25. Rxh5 Nb4. Gurevich resigns.

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    Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:23 AM
    Response to Reply #2
    6. Shabalov-Kacheishvili, US Open, Chicago
    Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 09:53 AM by Jack Rabbit



    Alex Shabalov
    Photo: British Columbia Chess Federation

    Alex Shabalov vs. Giorgi Kacheishvili
    US Open, Round 7
    Chicago, August 2006

    German Advance Game: Root Variation
    (Caro-Kann Defense)


    1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Be3 e6 5. Nd2 Nd7 6. Be2 Ne7 7. Ngf3 Qb6 8. 0-0 Qxb2 9. Rb1 Qxa2 10. Rxb7 Nc8 11. c4 dxc4 12. Bxc4 Qa3 13. d5?!

    White gets into more than a little trouble with this move. Safer and giving White a clear advantage is 13. Rc7 Bd3 14. Nb1 Bxb1 15. Qxb1 Ncb6 16. Rxc6.

    13. -- exd5 14. Nd4

    This is better than 14. Nb1 Qa5 15. Nd4 Ne7 16. Nxf5 Nxf5 17. Qg4 g6.

    14. -- Nc5 15. Nb5?

    Better is 15. Rc7 Bd7 16. Bb3 Qa6 17. e6 Nxe6 18. Nxe6 Bxe6 19. Rxc6 Qb7 20. Bf4, but even that leaves Black with a strong game. White should lose.

    15. -- cxb5 16. Bxb5+?

    Black throws it all away.

    If 16. Bxc5 then Black wins with 16. -- Bxc5 17. Bxb5+ Kf8 18. Nc4 Qd3 19. Rxf7+ Kxf7 20. Nd6+ Nxd6 21. Bxd3 Ne4.

    Now it is White who wins.

    16. -- Bd7

    If 16. -- Nd7 17. Nc4 Qe7 18. Qxd5 then:
    • 18. -- a6 19. Rxd7 Bxd7 20. Qxa8 axb5 21. Nd6+ and Black must lose his Queen or submit to mate.
    • If 18. -- Be6 19. Rxd7 then:
      • 19. -- Bxd7 20. Rd1 Rb8 21. Bxd7+ Kd8 22. Ba4+ Nd6 23. Nxd6 Qxd6 24. Qa5+ Rb6 25. Bxb6+ axb6 26. Qxb6+ Kc8 27. exd6 Bxd6 28. Rc1+ Bc7 29. Qxc7#
      • 19. -- Bxd5 20. Rxd5+ Qd7 21. Rxd7 a6 22. Bc6 Bb4 23. Rc7+ Kd8 24. Rb7 a5 25. Rd1+ Nd6 26. Rxd6+ Bxd6 27. Nxd6 -- 28. Rd7#
    17. Bxc5 Bxc5 18. Bxd7+ Kf8 19. Bxc8

    White also wins after 19. Qh5 g6 20. Qh6+ Kg8 21. e6 Nd6 22. exf7+ Nxf7 23. Be6 Be7 24. Bxf7+ Kxf7 25. Re1 Rae8 26. Qf4+ Kg8.

    19. -- Rxc8

    Black: Giorgi Kacheishvili
    !""""""""#
    $ +t+ L T%
    $Or+ +oOo%
    $ + + + +%
    $+ VoP + %
    $ + + + +%
    $W + + + %
    $ + N PpP%
    $+ +q+rK %
    /(((((((()

    White: Alex Shabalov
    Position after Black's 19th move
    20. Ne4!

    The proffered Knight cannot be accepted because if 20. -- dxe4 then 21. Qd7 threatens the Rook and mate on f7 at once.

    20. -- Rd8 21. Nxc5 Qxc5 22. Qf3 f6 23. Qh5 1-0

    Black is facing a quick mate:
    • 23. -- g6 24. Qh6+ Ke8 25. Qg7 Qf8 26. Qc7
      • 26. -- Qg7 27. Qxg7 Rd7 28. Qxd7+ Kf8 29. Qf7#
      • 26. -- a6 27. Qc6+ Rd7 28. Qxd7#
    • 23. -- Rd7 24. Rxd7 g6 25. Qh6+ Ke8 26. Qg7 Qf8 27. Rb1 Qxg7 28. Rxg7 Kf8 29. exf6 -- 30. Rb8#


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    Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:24 AM
    Response to Reply #2
    7. Shulman-Shabalov, US Open, Chicago



    Yury Shulman
    Photo: New York Masters

    Yury Shulman vs. Alex Shabalov
    US Open, Round 8
    Chicago, August 2006

    Queen's Gambit: Slav Defense (Chameleon Variation)


    1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 a6 5. a4 e6 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bh4 dxc4 8. a5 c5 9. Bxf6 Qxf6 10. d5

    White could also retake the pawn with the Bishop. If 10. e3 cxd4 11. Nxd4 then:
    • 11. -- Nc6 12. Bxc4
      • 12. -- Bb4 13. 0-0 0-0 14. Qb3 Nxd4 15. exd4 and a level game.
      • 12. -- Bd7 13. 0-0 Rc8 14. Nxc6 Bxc6 15. Qg4 with equality.
    • 11. -- Bd7 12. Bxc4 Nc6 13. 0-0 Rd8 14. Be2 Bb4 15. Qb3 Nxd4 16. Qxb4 Nxe2+ 17. Nxe2 and White has a slight advatage with his Queen in control of a vital diagonal and at the same time attacking the b-pawn.
    10. -- Qd8!?

    Better than 10. -- Be7? 11. e4 when:
    • if 11. -- exd5 12. Nxd5 then:
      • 12. -- Qc6 13. Ne5 Qd6 14. Nxc4 Qc6 15. Qh5 and Whate has multiple threats.
      • 12. -- Qd6 13. Nb6 winning at least the exchange
    • 11. -- 0-0 12. d6 Rd8 then:
      • 13. e5 Qf5 14. Bxc4 Bf8 15. Bd3 Qh5 16. Ra4 gives White a strong game and threatens 17. Rh4, trapping the Queen.
      • 13. Qe2? allows Black to level the game after 13. -- Bf8 14. e5 Qf5 15. Qe4 Nc6 16. Bxc4 =
    11. Ne5

    Other moves that establish an equibrium are:
    • 11. e3 exd5 12. Qxd5 Qe7 13. Qxc4 Be6 14. Qe4 Nc6 =
    • 11. e4 exd5 12. Nxd5 Nc6
      • 13. Bxc4 Bd6 14. Nb6 Rb8 15. Bd5 =
      • 13. Qa4?! c3 14. Nxc3 Bd7 15. Be2 Bd6 =+
    11. -- Nd7 12. Nxc4 Be7

    If 12. -- b5 then 13. axb6 Nxb6 14. e4 Rb8 15. dxe6 Qxd1+ 16. Nxd1 fxe6 17. Ne5 gives White a slight initiative.

    13. dxe6 fxe6 14. g3 b5?

    This loses. By this move, the queenside is loosened and White obtains a passed pawn which dicates the course of the middle game.

    At least two moves offer Black better hopes of survival:
    • 14. -- Qc7 then:
      • 15. Bh3 Qc6 16. 0-0 Rb8 17. Bg2 Qc7 18. f4 0-0 19. e4 Rd8 and White is only slightly better.
      • 15. Bg2 0-0 16. 0-0 Rb8 17. Qd3 Ne5 18. Nxe5 Qxe5 19. Rfd1 b5 20. axb6 Rxb6 with a level game.
    • 14. -- 0-0 15. Bh3 b5 16. axb6 Nxb6 17. Qxd8 Bxd8 18. Nd6 Bd7 19. Bg2 Ra7 20. 0-0 with a position that doesn't promise either player a lot.
    15. axb6 Bb7

    Other moves are not much better:
    • 15. -- Rb8
      • 16. Bg2 0-0
        • 17. Na4
          • 17. -- Nf6 18. Ne5 Bb7 19. Bxb7 Rxb7
            • 20. Qxd8 20. -- Rxd8 21. Nc6 Rd6 22. Nxe7+ Rxe7 23. 0-0 and White's advanced passed pawn and Knight attacking Black's weak pawns give him a strong game
            • 20. Nc6 Qe8 21. Nxe7+ Qxe7 22. Qd3
              • 22. -- Rfb8 23. Qxa6 and White has a strong position with Black's Rooks tied to stopping the b-pawn.
              • 22. -- Ra8 23. 0-0 Nd7 24. Rfc1 and again, White has a stong position based on the advanced b-pawn and attack on Black's weak queenside pawns.
          • 17. -- Bb7 18. Bxb7 Rxb7 19. Na5 and White should win.
        • 17. 0-0?! is weaker for White: 17. -- Nxb6 18. Ne5 Qxd1 19. Rfxd1 Bf6 with only a slight advantage
      • 16. Bh3?! allows Black equality: 16. -- Nxb6 17. Qxd8+ Kxd8 18. Ne5 Kc7 19. Bg2 Bf6
    • 15. -- 0-0 16. Bg2 Rb8 17. Na4
      • 17. -- Nf6 18. Ne5
        • 18. -- Bb7 19. Bxb7 Rxb7 20. Qxd8 Rxd8 21. Nc6 Rd6 takes us back to the theme of White's advanced passed pawn and Black's weak queenside pawns giving White a strong advantage.
        • 18. -- Qxd1+ 19. Rxd1 Rd8 20. Rxd8+ Bxd8 21. Nc6 Bb7 22. Nxb8 Bxg2 23. Rg1 Bd5 24. Nxa6 and now the pawn is a lethal weapon.
      • 17. -- Rf6 18. 0-0 Qe8 19. Nd6 Bxd6 20. Qxd6 and the pawn gives White a winning edge.
    16. e4?!

    White misses a faster win with 16. Rg1 0-0 17. Bh3 Nxb6 18. Qxd8 Bxd8 19. Bxe6+.

    16. -- 0-0 17. Bh3 Rf6

    If 17. -- Nxb6 18. Qxd8 then:
    • 18. -- Bxd8 19. Bxe6+ Kh7 20. Nxb6 Bxb6 21. Bd5 and White's dominate center assures him a winning opportunities.
    • 18. -- Raxd8 19. Nxb6 Kf7 20. f3 g6 21. Nc4 Bf6 22. e5 Be7 23. Ne4
    18. Qb3 Nb8

    If 18. -- Rb8 19. 0-0 then:
    • 19. -- Nf8 20. Rfd1 Qe8 21. Na5
      • 21. -- Qf7
        • 22. Rd2! Rf3 23. Nxb7 Rxb7 24. Bg2 and Black's attempts at counterplay come to nothing.
        • the immediate 22. Nxb7?! allows Black counterplay after 22. -- Rxb7 23. Rxa6 Rxf2 24. Ra7 for example, 24. -- Qf3 25. Re1 c4 26. Qxc4 Rxb2 27. Rf1 Qe3+ 28. Kh1 Rxa7 29. bxa7 Qxa7
      • 21. -- Bc8 22. e5 Rf7 23. b7 Bd7 24. f4 and White will soon launch attacks from the outpost at d6.
    • 19. -- Kh8 20. Rfd1 Qc8 21. Qa4 Bc6 22. Qxa6 Bb7 23. Qb5 and White has simultaneous threats on the queenside and in the center.
    19. Rd1 Qf8

    Black: Alex Shabalov
    !""""""""#
    $tN + Wl+%
    $+v+ V O %
    $oP +oR O%
    $+ O + + %
    $ +n+p+ +%
    $+qN + Pb%
    $ P + P P%
    $+ +rK +r%
    /(((((((()

    White: Yury Shulman
    Position after Black's 19th move

    20. Ne5!

    Protecting the f-pawn with 20. f4 Nc6 21. Ne5 Nxd4 22. Rxd4 cxd4 23. Nd7 would leave White with a strong position, but is too pedistrian. The f-pawn is not important, as White will soon demostrate.

    20. -- Rxf2

    If 20. -- Kh7 21. f4 then:
    • 21. -- Bc8 22. b7 Ra7 23. bxc8Q Qxc8 24. Nd5 and Whit literally has threats all over the board.
    • 21. -- Qg8 22. Nd7 Rg6 23. Qc2 Nc6 24. Na4 and White's multiple threats give him a probable win.
    21. Qxe6+ Kh7 22. Qg6+ Kh8 23. Qg4 Kh7

    If 23. -- Rf6 24. Ng6+ Rxg6 25. Qxg6 then:
    • 25. -- Nc6 26. Rf1 Qg8 27. Rd5
      • 27. -- Rf8 28. Rxf8 Qxf8 29. Bf5 and White has added mate on h7 to his list of threats.
      • 27. -- Bc8 28. Bxc8 Rxc8 29. b7 Rb8 30. Qxc6 and White threatens 31. Rd7, attacking the Bishop and preparing to tighten his grip on c8.
    • 25. -- a5 26. Rf1 Bf6 27. Bf5 Qg8 28. Be6 and White wins.
    24. Ng6 Qf6 25. Nxe7 Nc6 26. Ned5 Qf7 27. Nf4 Bc8

    If 27. -- Rxb2 28. Rd2 then:
    • 28. -- Bc8 29. Qxc8 Rxc8 30. Rxb2 Qc4 31. Bf5+ Kg8 32. Be6+ regaining the Queen and leaving White a Rook up.
    • 28. -- Rxb6 29. Qe6 Qxe6 30. Nxe6 Ne5 31. Rf1 c4 32. Nf8+ Kh8 33. Nd7 Nxd7 34. Rxd7 and Whites pieces are ready for a final assault on the Black King.
    28. Rd7 Bxd7 29. Qxd7 Qxd7 30. Bxd7 1-0

    30. Bxd7 Rxb2 31. b7 Rb8 32. Bxc6 leave White with three minor pieces to a Rook. Shabalov resigns.
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    Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:26 AM
    Response to Reply #2
    8. Krush-Noritsyn, Category 9 Tournament, Montreal
    Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 09:56 AM by Jack Rabbit



    Irina Krush
    Photo: website of the Women's World Chess Championship, 2006

    Irina Krush vs. Nikolay Noritsyn
    International Cat 9 Tournament, Round 2
    Montreal, August 2006

    West India Game: King's Indian Defense


    1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 g6 4. Nc3 d6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Nf3 0-0 7. Bd3 e5 8. 0-0 Nh5

    An equalibrium can also be established with 8. -- b6 9. b3 a6 10. Bb2 Nbd7 11. a3 Nh5.

    9. Re1

    9. Bg5
    • 9. -- Bf6 10. Bh6 Bg7 11. Be3 Nd7 12. Ne1 Ndf6 with equality (Hausrath-Oliwa, Posnan, 1995)
    • 9. -- f6 10. Be3 a6 11. Ne1 Qe8 12. Be2 with an even game (Verat-Bellas, Paris Op, May 1991)
    9. -- Nf4 10. Bxf4

    10. Bf1 Nd7 11. a3 a6 12. Rb1 Nf6 13. b4 and a level position (Edzgveradze-Shulman, EUch, Holon, Nov 1995).

    10. -- exf4 11. e5 dxe5 12. Nxe5 Nd7

    If 12. -- Re8 then 13. Nf3 Bg4 14. Rxe8+ Qxe8 15. Be2 Bxc3 16. bxc3 Qe4 and White has held against Black's encroachment.

    13. Nf3 g5 14. Bf5

    14. Qc2 h6 15. Rad1 g4 16. Nd2 Ne5 17. b3 f3 18. gxf3 gxf3 19. Nce4 is level.

    14. -- Bxc3 15. bxc3 Qf6 16. Qd3 h6 17. h4

    17. Rad1 Rd8 18. d6 Kg7 19. Bg4 Rb8 20. a3 Nf8 21. Bxc8 Rbxc8 leaves White with a small advantage owing to the passed d-pawn.

    17. -- Rd8 18. Re2 b5

    White's centralized pieces give her a better game after 18. -- gxh4 19. Rae1 Nf8 20. Re5 Ng6 21. Bxg6 fxg6 22. Nxh4 g5 23. Nf5.

    19. cxb5 c4 20. Qc2 Nb6 21. Bxc8

    21. Bh7+ Kg7 22. hxg5 hxg5 23. Be4 g4 24. Nd4 Qh4 25. Ree1 is even.

    21. -- Raxc8 22. hxg5 hxg5 23. Re5

    If 23. Rae1 Rxd5 24. a4 Kg7 25. a5 g4 then:
    • 26. Nd4 Rh5 gives Black an initiative.
    • 26. axb6 Qh6 27. Ng5 Rh8 (threatening mate on h1) 28. Nh3 gxh3 gives Black serious winning chances.
    23. -- Rxd5 24. Rae1 Rcc5 25. Re8+ Kg7 26. Nd4 Nc8?

    Black passively protects a pawn that is not under direct attack and loses.

    Correct is the more active 26. -- Re5, which cuts off the communcation between the Rook at e8 and the rest of White's forces: 27. a4 Rxe8 28. Rxe8 Re5 29. Rxe5 Qxe5 30. a5 Nd5. With the exchanges, Black's defesive burden is much relieved and the game is level.

    27. Qe2 f3

    If the last move wasn't a blunder, this would have been. Black gets nothing in return for the pawn sacrifice. Although White still has a strong game, better is 27. -- Nd6 28. Re7 Kh6 29. a4 Nc8 30. Rb7 Re5.

    28. Qxf3 Qxf3 29. gxf3 Kf6

    If 29. -- Rc7 30. a4 then:
    • 30. -- Kf6
      • 31. Rh8 Ne7 32. Kg2 Nf5 33. Nxf5 Kxf5 34. Rhe8 and White's queenside pawn majority gives her a strong Rook-and-pawn ending.
      • 31. Kg2 Re7 32. R8xe7 Nxe7 33. Re4 and Black's Rooks are tied to his weak pawns while White attacks.

    • 30. -- Nb6 31. Ra1
      • 31. -- Rdd7 32. Nf5+ Kf6 33. Ne3 +/-
      • 31. -- Rcd7 32. a5! Rxd4 33. cxd4 Nd5 34. Rc8 +-
    White also wins after 29. -- Nd6 30. R8e7 Nc8 31. Rb7 and her queenside majority and piece activity give White a winning game.

    30. a4 Nb6 31. Ra1 Rd7 32. Nc6 Rf5 33. a5 Nd5

    Black: Nikolay Noritsyn
    !""""""""#
    $ + +r+ +%
    $O +t+o+ %
    $ +n+ L +%
    $Pp+m+tO %
    $ +o+ + +%
    $+ P +p+ %
    $ + + P +%
    $R + + K %
    /(((((((()

    White: Irina Krush
    Position after Black's 33rd move

    34. b6!!

    The victory is now secure. Either the pawn queens or Black will lose naterial stopping it.

    If Black plays 34. -- a6, then 35. Nb8 Rb7 36. Nxa6 Nxc3 37. Rc8 and now:
    • 37. -- Nd5 38. Rxc4 Kg7 39. Rc5 Kg6 40. Rd1 Nf4 41. Rd6+ f6 42. Rc7 +-
    • 37. -- g4 38. Nc5 gxf3 39. Nxb7 +-; 37. -- Nb5 38. Nc5 Na7 39. Ne4+ Kg6 40. bxa7 Rxa7 41. a6 +-
    • 37. -- Ne2+ 38. Kf1 Nd4 39. Nc5 Rxc5 40. Rxc5 Nxf3 41. Rd1 +-
    34. -- axb6 35. a6 Nc7

    Also futile is 35. -- Nxc3 36. a7 Rxa7 37. Nxa7 Rxf3 38. Rb8 Ne4 39. Rxb6+.

    36. a7 Rc5 37. Rc8!

    Even with the ensuing exchanges, in which White sacrifices a Rook, she emerges with a Queen to a Rook.

    37. -- Rxc6 38. Rxc7 Rcxc7 39. a8Q Rd3 40. Ra6 Rd6

    40. -- Rd1+ 41. Kg2 Kg7 42. Rxb6 Rc5 43. Qe8 Rcd5 44. Rb8 is no better.

    41. Rxb6 Rxb6 42. Qd8+

    White wins a Rook. The rest of the game requires no comment.

    42. -- Re7 43. Qxb6+ Re6 44. Qd4+ Ke7 45. Qxc4 Re5 46. Qc6 Re6 47. Qd5 f6 48. c4 Rd6 49. Qb5 Rd1+ 50. Kg2 Rc1 51. c5 Ke6 52. Qc6+ Ke7 53. Qd6+ 1-0

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    Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Aug-20-06 09:28 AM
    Response to Reply #2
    9. Sokolov-Day, Staunton Memorial Tournament, London
    Edited on Sun Aug-20-06 10:12 AM by Jack Rabbit



    Ivan Sokolov
    Photo: World Chess Trophy (Czech)

    Ivan Sokolov vs. Lawrence Day
    Staunton Memorial Tournament, Round 1
    London, August 2006

    Queen's Gambit Exchange: Orthodox Defense


    1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 Be7 7. e3 c6 8. Bd3 Nh5

    Also satisfactory for both sides is 8. -- 0-0 9. Rc1 Re8 10. 0-0 b6.

    9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. 0-0 0-0 11. Qb1 g6 12. b4 Ndf6 13. b5 c5?!

    This saddles Black with an isolated d-pawn, a structural weakness, a fact that will color the next phase of the game.

    14. dxc5 Qxc5 15. Qb2

    If 15. Rc1 then:
    • 15. -- Bg4 16. Nd4
      • 16. -- Rac8 17. Qb2 Nd7 18. Qd2 Ne5 19. a4 Nxd3 20. Qxd3 and White has better pawn structure.
      • 16. -- Rfe8 17. a4 Rac8 18. a5 Ng7 19. a6 b6 20. Nc6 White has greater mobility because Black's pieces are tied to the defense of the isolated d-pawn.
    • 15. -- Bf5? 16. Bxf5 gxf5 17. Qxf5 Qd6 18. Rd1 White has a huge advatage by threatening the d-pawn.
    15. -- Qd6 16. Rfd1 Be6 17. a4 Rfd8 18. a5 Rab8?!

    If 18. -- Bg4 19. Be2 then:
    • 19. -- Rac8
      • 20. Rac1
        • 20. -- Ng7
          • 21. h3 Bf5 22. Nd4 Be4 23. Nxe4 Nxe4 24. Bf3 and White will destroy Black's outpost at e4 while maintaining his own at d4.
          • 21. Qd2 a6 22. h3 Bf5 23. Nd4 axb5 24. Bxb5 and White has a small advantage in pawn structure.
        • 20. -- Re8 21. h3 Be6 22. Qd2 White has a small advantage in pawn structure.
      • 20. a6 b6 21. Qd2 Ng7 22. Rac1 Rc5 23. h3 and White's advantage in pawn structure is offset by Black's control of open lines.
    • 19. -- Bf5
      • 20. Bc4 Be6
        • 21. Rac1 a6
          • 22. Bd3 axb5 23. Nxb5 Qe7 White has better control of open lines and better pawn structure.
          • 22. Be2 Rdc8 23. b6 White has a small advantage with better pawn structure.
        • 21. Ba2 a6 22. Rac1 axb5 23. Nxb5 Qe7 White's pawnstructure and control of the c-file give him a small plus.
      • 20. Rac1 Rac8 21. Ne1 Ng7 22. Bf3 Qe5 23. Qd2 Rc5 White has a small plus in pawn structure, but Black may be able to offset it with control of open lines.
    19. h3 Qe7

    If 19. -- Rbc8 then:
    • 20. b6 a6
      • 21. Qd2 Re8 22. Rac1 Ng7 23. Nd4 and White has an small advantage with a better pawn structure.
      • 21. Rac1 Rc5 22. Qb4 Rdc8 23. Rc2 Ne8 and Black is compensated for being saddled with an isolated pawn in his control of the c-file.
    • 20. Ne2 Nd7 21. Rac1 Re8 22. Qd2 Nc5 23. Bc2 Nf6 24. Nc3 and White has a small advantage in pawn structure.
    20. Nd4 Rd6

    Better than 20. -- Re8 21. a6 and now:
    • 21. -- Bd7 22. Qb3 Qd6 23. axb7 Rxb7 24. Qc2 Rc8 25. b6 and White has only a small advantage.
    • 21. -- Rec8?! 22. axb7 Rxb7 23. Qd2 Ng7 24. Nc6 Qc7 25. Ra6 and Black will tie up his pieces to protect his a-pawn.
    21. Be2 Ng7

    If 21. -- Rc8 22. Rac1 Rdd8 23. a6 then White gets a pawn at a7 and a strong position in these variations:
    • ]23. -- Ng7 24. b6
      • 24. -- axb6 25. a7 Ra8 26. Qxb6
      • 24. -- Rc5 25. Nb3 Rcc8 26. bxa7 bxa6 27. Bxa6 Ra8 28. Nb5
    • 23. -- Re8 24. b6 axb6 25. a7 Qd6 26. Qa1
    22. Qa3 Nfe8

    If 22. -- Rd7 23. Qxe7 Rxe7 24. Rac1 Ree8 25. Bf3
    • 25. -- Rbc8
      • 26. a6 bxa6 27. bxa6
        • 27. -- Rb8 28. Ncb5 and White threatens Black's a-pawn.
        • 27. -- Nf5 28. Ndb5 Re7 29. g4 Nh4 and White is a pawn up with threats.
      • 26. e4?! dxe4 27. Nxe4 Nxe4 28. Bxe4 b6 29. Bc6 with equality.
    • 25. -- Rbd8 26. Nc2 Nf5 27. g4 Nd6 28. Nb4 and White threatens the d-pawn.
    23. a6 Qg5

    If 23. -- Qd8 24. axb7 Rxb7 25. Qc5 then:
    • 25. -- Qb6 26. Qxb6
      • 26. -- axb6 27. Ra8 Kf8 28. Nxe6+ fxe6 29. Ne4 and White must win a pawn or the exchange.
      • 26. -- Rdxb6 27. Nc6 Rc7 28. Nxd5 Bxd5 29. Rxd5 Ne6 30. Nxa7 leaves White two pawns up.
    • 25. -- Rdd7 26. Nc6 Qg5 27. Bf3 Bxh3 28. Rxd5 Bf5 29. Rxd7 and the a-pawn will fall, giving White an advanced passer.
    24. Nxe6 Nxe6 25. Ne4 dxe4

    At laast, the isolated pawn is repaired, but not before the game is lost for Black.

    26. Rxd6 Nxd6 27. Qxd6 Rd8

    27. -- Qd8 28. Qe5 bxa6 29. Rxa6 Rc8 30. Rxa7 Rc1+ 31. Kh2 Rc5 32. Qa1 Qb8+ 33. Kg1 and White threatens to skewer the Queen.

    Black: Lawrence Day
    !""""""""#
    $ + T +l+%
    $Oo+ +o+o%
    $p+ Qm+o+%
    $+p+ + W %
    $ + +o+ +%
    $+ + P +p%
    $ + +bPp+%
    $R + + K %
    /(((((((()

    White: Ivan Sokolov
    Position after Black's 27th move

    28. axb7!!

    28. Qb4? lets Black off the hook: 38. -- Qe5 29. Ra4 bxa6 30. Rxa6 Rd7 31. Qa5 Qb2 32. Bg4 f5 with equality.

    28. -- Rxd6 29. b8Q+ Rd8

    If 29. -- Qd8 30. Qxd8+ Nxd8 31. Rxa7 then:
    • 31. -- Kg7 32. Kf1
      • 32. -- h5 33. Ke1
        • 33. -- Kh6 34. Ra6 Rd7 35. b6 f5 36. Ra8 and the passed pawn gives White superior mobility.
        • 33. -- Rb6 34. Kd2 Rb8 35. Kc3 and the King will approach for escort duty.
      • 32. -- Kf6 33. Ke1 h5 34. Bc4 g5 35. Ke2 and White will soon be able to advance the b-pawn.
    • 31. -- h5 32. Kf1 Kf8 33. Ke1 f5 34. Bc4 Ne6 35. Ke2 and White's threats include advancing the b-pawn, breaking up Black's pawns with f3 and moving the Bishop behind Black's pawn chain.
    30. Qxa7 Nc5 31. Bc4 Rd7 32. b6 Qe7

    32. -- Qf6 33. Rb1 Re7 34. b7 Rxb7 35. Rxb7 Nxb7 36. Qxb7 Qa1+ 37. Kh2 Qf6 38. Qxe4 fails.

    33. Qb8+ Kg7

    If 33. -- Rd8 34. Qf4 Kg7 35. Ra7 Rd1+ 36. Kh2 Rd7 37. Rxd7 then:
    • 37. -- Nxd7 38. b7 and White theatens to queen at b8 or take the pawn on f7 with check.
    • 37. -- Qxd7 38. Qe5+ wins the Knight.
    34. Ra7 Rd1+ 35. Kh2 Nd7 36. Qf4 Rd6

    If 36. -- Qd6 37. Qxd6 Rxd6 38. b7 Rb6 39. Bd5 then White threatens the e-pawn, the f-pawn, the Knight at d7 and to queen on b8.

    37. Bb5 f5 38. Bxd7 1-0

    If 38. -- Rxb6 39. Qc7 Rf6 40. Bxf5 Qxc7+ 41. Rxc7+ Kh6 42. Bxe4 then Black is down a piece. Mr. Day resigns.
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