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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 02:07 PM
Original message
The JR Chess Report: Wijk aan Zee is Underway
They're Underway in Wijk aan Zee



The 72nd Corus Chess Tournament, divided into three groups, began yesterday in the Dutch resort town of Wijk aan Zee.

Each group is a single round robin competition among 14 players. Group A, a category 19 grandmaster contest, this years features the world's top ranked play, 19-year-old Magnus Carlsen of Norway, reigning world champion Vishy Anand of India, former world champion Vladimir Kramnik and the reigning American champion, Hikaru Nakamura.

After the second round played earlier today, Spanish grandmaster by way of Latvia Alexei Shirov is the only player to have won both his games. Carlsen and Nakamura, who both won today, are tied for second with a point and a half each.

In Group B, German GM Arkadij Naiditsch, another Latvian expatriate, is the rating favorite. However, in the early going the group is led by 15-year-old reigning Dutch champion Anish Giri, whose mother is Russian and father is Nepalese. Naiditsch and Ni Hua of China are tied for second with a point and a half each.

Group C is called the "Kindergarten" by the other players, since most of the players are under 21. The top seed player is Chinese grandmaster Li Chao, 20, followed by former world junior champion Abhijeet Gupta of India, also 20, and newly-invested grandmester Ray Robson of the United States, 15.

After two rounds in Group C, young Robson leads the pack with a perfect score, followed by a four-way tie for second that inclues Li, Italian GM Daniele Vocaturo, 20, Dutch federation master Stefan Kuipers, 19, and 12-time Dutch women's champion Peng Zhaoqin, who immigrated to Holland from China before Ray Robson was born.

In a game today between the school master and the governess of the Kindergarten, Mw. Peng defeated Norwegian GM Kjetil Lie, who is 29.

Both of the Muzychuk sisters are playing in Wijk aan Zee this year. Anna, 19, who plays for Slovenia, is in Group B and currently has 1 point as a result of two draws, while 17-year-old Mariya, who plays for their native Ukraine, has a half point in Group C.

The tournament runs through January 31 with rest days on January 20, 25 and 28. The entire tournament is covered at the official website. Games begin at 1:30 pm Dutch time (4:30 am PST).


Gheam Maghami Leads Parsvnath Open in New Delhi



Iranian grandmaster Ehsan Ghaem Maghami has a perfect score after six rounds to stand alone in first place in the eighth annual Parsvnath International Open in the Indian capital of New Delhi.

Gheam Maghami defeated Indian IM Oliver Dimakiling today in 49 moves.

Tomorrow, Ghaem Magahmi will face Russian grandmaster Maxim Turov, who is in a three-way tie for second with 5 points. Also in second place with 5 points are Indian IMs Richad Bitoon and M. R. Lalith Babu. IM Tania Sachdev of India is the leading woman player with 5 points.

There are over 370 players participating in the Parsvnath Open. The 11-round tournament concludes Friday.

The tournament is being covered by the website of the Delhi Chess Association. Live coverage begins at 2:30 pm local time (1 am PST).


Russia Takes the Gold as World Team Championship Concludes



Russia defeated Israel in the final round of the World Team Championship in Bursa, Turkey, Wednesday to take home the gold medal by two match points over the United States and India.

Russia won their match with Israel by a score of 3-1 behind victories by reigning European champion Evgeny Tomashevsky and Nikita Vitiugov. The United States, which entered the round as the only team with a chance at catching Russia, played to a 2-2 tie against the reigning European team champions from Azerbaijan. India scored a victory over Brazil, 3-, to tie the US in match points.

The US takes home the silver medal by virtue of 21 individual points as opposed to the bronze medalists from India with 21.

Hikaru Nakamura, the reigning US champion, won a gold medal for best score on the top board after scoring 6 points in the eight games he played. The gold medal for best overall score by any player went to Russia's Nikita Vitiugov, who scored 5 out of six to edge out Shakhriyar Mamedyarov of Azerbaijan, who scored 8 out of nine.


Calendar

Corus Chess Tournament, Wijk aan Zee 15-31 January 2010.
Group A: Anand, Carlsen, Caruana, Dominguez, Ivanchuk, Karjakin, Kramnik, Leko, Nakamura, Shirov, Short, Smmets, Tiviakov and van Wely.
Group B: Akobian, Giri, Howell, L'Ami, A. Muzychuk, Naiditsch, Negi, Ni Hua, Nisipeanu, Nyback, Pentala, Reinderman, So and Sutovsky.
Group C: Bok, Grandelius, Gupta, Kuipers, Li Chao, K. Lie, M. Muzychuk, Peng, Plukkel, Robson, Soumya, Swinkels, van Kempen and Vocaturo.

Gibraltar Chess Festival 26 January-4 February.

Moscow Open 29 January-8 February.

Bundesliga 0910, Rounds 7-9, Munich, Mlheim, Berlin, Ramagen. 5-7 February.

Aeroflot Open, Moscow 9-17 February.

27th Ciudad de Linares 12-25 February. Aronian, Gashimov, Gelfand, Grischuk, Topalov and Vallejo.

Reykjavik Open 24 February-3 March.

Bundesliga 0910, Rounds 10-11, Mlheim, Heidelburg, Solingen, Trier. 27-28 February.

European Individual Championships, Rijeka (Croatia) 5-19 March.

Melody Amber Rapid/Blindfold Tournament, Nice. 12-25 March. Aronian, Carlsen, Domnguez, Gelfand, Gashimov, Ivanchuk, Karjakin, Kramnik, Morozevich, Ponomariov, Smeets and Svidler.

Philadelphia Open 31 March-4 April. This replaces the Foxwoods Open after the Foxwoods Resort announced expected room rate hikes.

Russian Team Championships, Dagomys 1-12 April.

Women's Grand Prix, Nalchik 23 April-6 May.

Anand-Topalov Match for the World Title, Sofia 23 April-10 May.

Grand Prix, Astrakhan (Russia) 9-25 May.

US Championship, St. Louis 13-25 May.

Chicago Open 27-31 May.

Women's Grand Prix, Jermuk 23 June-6 July.

World Open, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania 29 June-5 July.

Women's Grand Prix, Ulan Bator (Mongolia) 29 July-12 August.

World Junior Championships, Chotowa Czarna (Poland) 2-17 August.

Chess Olympiad, Khanty Mansiysk 19 September-4 October.

European Club Cup, Plovdiv 16-24 October.

Women's Grand Prix, Vina del Mar (Chile) 27 October-9 November.

World Youth Championships, Halidiki (Greece) 19-31 October.

FIDE Women's Knock Out (Women's World Championship), Turkey 2-25 December.

Games will be posted later today.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 04:08 PM
Response to Original message
1. This week's games

Your humble hare acknowledges the assistance of Fritz 6.0 on analysis.

Diagrams on the Jack Rabbit Chess Report are made with Chess Mrida, a true type font that can be downloaded free here.

BLACK
!""""""""#
$tMvWlVmT%
$OoOoOoOo%
$ + + + +%
$+ + + + %
$ + + + +%
$+ + + + %
$pPpPpPpP%
$RnBqKbNr%
/(((((((()

WHITE
White to move
(This position is a theoretical draw)



I would like to thank my impressive and loyal staff: Buccaneer, Spitfire, Swashbuckler, Pancho and Robin Hood.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 04:09 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. World Team Championship, Bursa



Bursa
Photo by Bursa Uludag, Wikipedia (Creative Commons, Attribution/Share Alike)

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 04:10 PM
Response to Reply #2
3. Sarwat - Vitigugov, Round 8



Nakita Vitiugov
Photo: Russian Chess Federation


Walaa Sarwat (Egypt) - Nikita Vitiugov (Russia)
World Team Championship, Round 8/Board 4
Bursa, 12 January 2010

English Game: Reverse Benoni Opening


1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 d4 3.e3 Nc6 4.exd4 Nxd4 5.Nxd4 Qxd4 6.Nc3 c6

  • If 6...e5 7.d3 Ne7 then:
    • 8.Be2 Nf5 9.0-0 c6 10.g4 Nh4 11.Be3 Qd6 12.Ne4 Qg6 13.Ng3 Bd6 14.d4 e4 15.Qc2 Nf3+ 16.Bxf3 exf3 17.Qe4+ Kf8 is equal (Illescas-Salov, IT, Dos Hermanas, 1995).
    • 8.Be3 transposes to the notes after Black's 7th move.

7.d3 Nh6

  • If 7...e5 8.Be3 then:
    • If 8...Qd8 then:
      • If 9.Be2 Nf6 10.0-0 Be7 then:
        • If 11.d4 exd4 12.Qxd4 0-0 13.Rfd1 Qxd4 14.Bxd4 then:
          • 14...Be6 15.h3 Rfd8 16.Be5 Rxd1+ 17.Rxd1 Rd8 18.Rxd8+ Bxd8 19.Bd4 Bb6 20.Bxb6 axb6 21.Kf1 Kf8 22.Ke1 Ke7 draw (Lilienthal-Flohr, Soviet Ch, Moscow, 1944).
          • 14...Rd8 15.Be5 Be6 16.Rxd8+ Rxd8 17.Rd1 Kf8 18.Rxd8+ Bxd8 19.Bd4 Bb6 20.Bxb6 axb6 draw (Vesely-Cucka, IT, Chocen, 1950).
        • 11.Kh1 0-0 12.f4 exf4 13.Rxf4 Be6 14.d4 Qd7 15.Bd3 Bg4 16.Qd2 is equal (Botvinnik-Flohr, Soviet Ch, Moscow, 1944).
      • 9.d4 exd4 10.Qxd4 Qxd4 11.Bxd4 Nf6 12.0-0-0 Be7 13.Bd3 0-0 14.Rhe1 Bd6 15.f3 Rd8 16.Bg1 gives White the advantage in space (Vogt-Suetin, IT, Leipzig, 1986).
    • 8...Qd6 9.Be2 Ne7 10.Ne4 Qc7 11.0-0 Nf5 12.Bd2 Be7 13.Bc3 0-0 14.Bg4 Rd8 is equal (Andersson-Portisch, IT, Madrid, 1973).

8.Be3 Qd8 9.d4!?

  • 9.Bxh6 gxh6 10.d4 Bg7 11.d5 Qd6 12.Rc1 Qg6 13.Qf3 Qg5 14.Qe3 Be5 15.Qxg5 hxg5 16.Bd3 is equal (Zvjaginsev-Granda, IT, Pamplona, 1996).

9...Nf5

  • The game is equal.

10.Be2 g6

  • 10...e6 11.0-0 Bd6 12.Bg4 0-0 13.Bxf5 exf5 remains equal.

11.Qd2

  • White prepares to attack the finachettoed Bishop.

11...Bg7 12.0-0-0

  • If 12.Rd1 0-0 13.0-0 Qa5 then:
    • 14.a3 Rd8 15.d5 e6 16.Bg5 Rd7 remains equal.
    • 14.d5 cxd5 15.cxd5 Nxe3 16.Qxe3 Qb4 17.Rd2 Rd8 remains equal.

12...Qa5 13.Kb1 0-0 14.g4 Nxe3 15.fxe3

  • If 15.Qxe3 e5 16.d5 cxd5 then:
    • 17.Rxd5 Qc7 18.Rhd1 Be6 19.Rc5 remains equal.
    • 17.Nxd5 Be6 18.Rd2 Rad8 19.Rhd1 Bxd5 20.Rxd5 Rxd5 21.cxd5 remains equal.

15...Rd8 16.Qc2

  • 16.h4 b6 17.Rhf1 Bb7 18.Qe1 Rd7 19.h5 Rad8 remains equal.

16...c5 17.dxc5

  • If 17.Qe4 cxd4 then:
    • 18.exd4 e6 19.Rhf1 Qb6 20.Nb5 Qc6 is equal.
    • If 18.Rxd4!? then:
      • 18...Bxd4! 19.exd4 Rd6 20.d5 Qd8 gives Black the exchange.
      • 18...Rxd4!? 19.exd4 Qb6 20.Rd1 is equal.

17...Bd7 18.Rd3!?

  • The pawn sacrifice is somewhat dubious.
  • If 18.Ne4 Bc6 19.Bf3 Rac8 then:
    • 20.Rxd8+ Rxd8 21.Rd1 Rxd1+ 22.Qxd1 Bh6 23.g5 Bxe4+ is equal.
    • 20.h4 Bxe4 21.Qxe4 Qxc5 22.Rxd8+ Rxd8 23.Rc1 Rd2 gives Black the more active game.

18...Bc6 19.Nd5 Qxc5 20.Rhd1

  • 20.b4!? Qd6! 21.Rhd1 Rd7 22.h4 Rad8 23.Bf3 Qe5 gives Black a strong initiative.

20...e6!

  • A Knight is the next best thing to a pawn for holding space. By driving away White's centralized Knight, Black opens lines for his own pieces.l

21.Nc3

  • If 21.Nf4 Rdc8 22.Ra3 Rab8 then:
    • 23.Rc1 Rc7 24.h4 Rbc8 25.Qd2 b5 26.Nd3 Be4 gives Black the advantage in space.
    • 23.h4 b5 24.cxb5 Qxc2+ 25.Kxc2 Bxb5+ 26.Kd2 Bxb2 leaves Black a pawn to the good.

21...Rxd3 22.Rxd3?

  • White would get more play by taking with the Queen, which doubles on the d-file immediately. While doubling with a Queen behind the Rook is more ideal, speed is more important. Speed is an important matter in chess, just as it in physical sports.
  • 22.Qxd3 Rc8 23.h4 a6 24.h5 g5 then:
    • 25.a4 b5 26.cxb5 acb5 27.Nxb5 Bxb5 28.Qxb5 Qxe3 gives White potential counterplay on the queenside.
    • If 25.Rc1!? h6 then:
      • 26.Qd2 b6 Bd3 Bau 28.Na4 Qc6 gives Black the more active game.
      • 26.Bf1!? b5 27.cxb5 Bxb4 White is driven back into his camp.

22...Rc8

  • Better is 22...Rf8! 23.Qb3 Bh6 24.e4 b5 when:
    • 25.Rh3 Bg5 26.a3 Qe5 27.cxb5 Bxe4+ 28.Nxe4 Qxe4+ 29.Qd3 Qe5 Black continues with a strong initiative.
    • 26.Nxb5 Bxe4+! 27.Ka1 Rd8 28.Nc3 Qg1+! is an easy win for Black.
  • 25.Rd1 b4 26.Nb5 Bxe4+ 27.Ka1 Bf4 28.Rd4 f5 leaves Black a pawn up with a strong initiative.

23.Qd2

  • 23.h4 b5 24.Qd2 bxc4 25.Rd8+ Rxd8 26.Qxd8+ Bf8 doesn't break Black's initiative.

BLACK: Nikita Vitiugov
!""""""""#
$ +t+ +l+%
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$ +v+o+o+%
$+ W + + %
$ +p+ +p+%
$+ NrP + %
$pP Qb+ P%
$+k+ + + %
/(((((((()

WHITE: Walaa Sarwat
Position after 23.Qc2d3


23...Bf6!

  • Many, many contests have been with a mere waiting move. Vitiugov knows he is waiting for his opponent to fall apart.

24.Qe1

  • No better is 24.a3 Qxc4 25.Rd8+ Rxd8 26.Qxd8+ Bxd8 27.Bxc4 g5.

24...b5 25.cxb5 Be4!

  • Black wins the exchange. The rest requires no comment.

26.Kc1 Bxd3 27.Bxd3 Bxc3 28.bxc3 Qa3+ 29.Kb1 Rxc3 30.Bc2 Qb4+ 31.Ka1 Qc5 0-1
BLACK: Nikita Vitiugov
!""""""""#
$ + + +l+%
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$ + +o+o+%
$+pW + + %
$ + + +p+%
$+ T P + %
$p+b+ + P%
$K + Q + %
/(((((((()

WHITE: Walaa Sarwat
Final Position after 31...Qb4c5


  • Sarwat Sahib resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 04:12 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. Tomashevsky - Roiz, Round 9
Reigning European champion Evgeny Tomashevsky contributed to Russia's gold medal finish by winning in the final round over Israel's Michael Roiz.



Evgeny Tomashevsky
Photo: Official Website of the 10th European Individual Chess Championship


Evgeny Tomashevsky (Russia) - Michael Roiz (Israel)
World Team Championship, Round 9/Board 2
Bursa, 13 January 2010

Slav Queen's Gambit: Tikhi Opening


1.c4 c6 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.d4 d5 4.e3 Bf5 5.Nc3 e6 6.Nh4 Bg6

  • For notes up to here, see Jakovenko-Vitiugov, Russian Ch, Moscow, 2009.
  • If 6...Be4 7.f3 Bg6 8.Qb3 then:
    • If 8...Qc7 9.Bd2 then:
      • If 9...Be7 then:
        • If 10.cxd5 cxd5 then:
          • 11.Rc1 Nc6 12.Nxg6 hxg6 13.Na4 Nd7 14.Bd3 Rb8 leaves Black's weak points covered; Black is better poised to take the initiative (Jakovenko-Vitiugov,Russian Ch, Moscow, 2009).
          • If 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.0-0-0 Nc6 13.Kb1 a6 14.Rc1 then:
            • If 14...0-0 15.g4 then:
              • 15...Rfc8 16.h4 Na5 17.Qc2 Nc4 is equal (Khmelniker-Yordanov, Euro Ch, Plovdiv, 2008).
              • 15...Na5 16.Qd1 Nc4 17.Bxc4 dxc4 18.e4 Rfd8 is equal (Drozdovskij-C. Balogh, Mindsports Rpd, Beijing, 2008).
            • 14...Nd7 15.Bd3 Rc8 16.Ne2 Qb6 17.Qd1 Bb4 18.h4 Bxd2 19.Qxd2 is equal (Tregubov-Bareev, Euro Club Cup, Fgen, 2006).
        • If 10.Nxg6 hxg6 11.0-0-0 then:
          • If 11...Nbd7 12.cxd5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 exd5 then:
            • If 14.Kb1 0-0-0 15.Rc1 Kb8 16.h3 then:
              • 16...Qd6 17.Ba6 Nb6 18.Bd3 Nd7 19.Ba5 gives White the initiative (Vitiugov-P. Smirnov, Russian Ch HL, Novokuznetsk, 2008).
              • 16...Nf6 17.Bd3 Nh5 18.Rc3 Ng3 19.Rhc1 Ka8 20.Qa4 gives White the initiative(Bagheri-Poat, Op, Cappelle la Grande, 2006).
            • 14.e4 0-0-0 15.exd5 cxd5+ 16.Kb1 Qd6 17.g3 g5 18.Bd3 Kb8 is equal (Kishnev-S. Volkov, Euro Club Cup, Halidiki, 2002).
          • 11...a6 12.Kb1 dxc4 13.Bxc4 b5 14.Bd3 c5 15.dxc5 Nbd7 16.Ne4 Nxe4 17.Bxe4 Nxc5 18.Qc3 Bf6 19.Qc2 Rc8 is equal (Le Quang Liem-C. Balogh, Mindsports Rpd, Beijing, 2008).
      • If 9...Nbd7 10.cxd5 exd5 11.0-0-0 then:
        • 11...0-0-0 12.e4 dxe4 13.Nxg6 hxg6 14.fxe4 Nb6 15.Bg5 Re8 16.Bd3 Ng4 17.Rhf1 gives White the advantage in space, anchored by a central pawn duo (Tregubov-Peng, Corus B, Wijk aan Zee, 2002).
        • 11...Be7 12.Nxg6 hxg6 13.e4 dxe4 14.fxe4 Nb6 15.g3 0-0 16.Bf4 Qd8 17.h4 gives White the advantage in space, again featuring a central pawn duo (Sargissian=Beliavsky, Euro Ch, Istanbul, 2003).
    • If 8...Qb6 9.Nxg6 hxg6 10.Bd2 Nbd7 11.0-0-0 then:
      • 11...Qxb3 12.axb3 Bd6 13.h3 Nh5 14.Bd3 Ng3 15.Rhe1 0-0 16.Kb1 a6 17.Rc1 Rac8 18.Red1 Rfd8 is equal (Gelfand-Eljanov, Grand Prix, Jermuk, 2009).
      • 11...Be7 12.Kb1 0-0-0 13.Qc2 Kb8 14.g4 dxc4 15.Bxc4 Rh3 16.g5 Nd5 17.e4 Nxc3+ 18.Qxc3 is equal (Tkachiv-Shirov, Op, Corsica, 2003).

7.Nxg6

  • If 7.Be2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Bd6 9.g3 then:
    • If 9...0-0 10.Nxg6 hxg6 then:
      • 11.Qb3 Rb8 12.Rd1 Qe7 13.Qc2 dxc4 14.Bxc4 Nb6 15.Bd3 Rfd8 16.Bd2 is equal (Rodshtein-Ragger, Aeroflot Open, Moscow, 2009).
      • 11.b3 Qe7 12.Bf3 Rac8 13.Bg2 Rfd8 14.Bd2 Bb4 15.a3 Bxa3 16.c5 Bb2 17.Rxa7 gives White the more active game (Gelfand-Kramnik, Tal Mem, Moscow, 2007).
    • 9...Qe7 10.a3 dxc4 11.Bxc4 Nb6 12.Be2 0-0 13.Bd2 Rfe8 14.Nxg6 hxg6 15.Qc2 e5 16.dxe5 Bxe5 is equal (Meier-S. B. Hansen, Euro ChT, Novi Sad, 2009).

7...hxg6 8.a3

  • If 8.Bd2 Nbd7 then:
    • If 9.g3 Be7 then:
      • If 10.b3 0-0 11.Bg2 dxc4 12.bxc4 e5 13.Qb3 then:
        • 13...Rb8 14.Rd1 Qc7 15.0-0 Rfd8 16.Bc1 gives White the advantage in space (Kramnik-Gelfand, Amber Blind, Monte Carlo, 2005).
        • 13...Re8 14.0-0 exd4 15.exd4 Nc5 16.dxc5 Qxd2 17.Rad1 Qg5 18.Qxb7 Qxc5 19.Qxc6 Rac8 20.Qxc5 Rxc5 21.Bd5 gives White an extra pawn (Raznikov-Wageih, World Youth, Vung Tau, 2008).
      • If 9...Bb4 10.Qb3 Bxc3 11.Bxc3 Ne4 12.Bg2 Nxc3 then:
        • 13.bxc3 Qc7 14.Rb1 Rb8 15.Bf3 draw (Dreev-Motylev, Aeroflot Op, Moscow, 2008).
        • 13.Qxc3 f5 14.0-0 Qe7 15.cxd5 exd5 16.b4 Nf6 17.Qb2 a6 18.a4 g5 19.b5 gives White more play on the queenside for the moment that Black gets on the other wing (Kramnik-Topalov, World Ch Match, Elista, 2006).
    • If 9.Rc1 Bd6 10.g3 Qe7 11.c5 Bc7 12.f4 then:
      • 12...Ba5 13.Nb1 Bxd2+ 14.Nxd2 Ne4 15.Nxe4 dxe4 16.h4 f5 17.Kf2 Nf6 18.Be2 Kf7 19.a3 a5 20.Qd2 Rhb8 21.Rc2 b5 draw (Bareev-Dreev, Russian Ch, Moscow, 2004).
      • 12...g5 13.Bg2 gxf4 14.exf4 g6 15.b4 a6 16.Qf3 Nh5 is equal (Campos-M. Gurevich, Op, Andorra, 2005).
  • If 8.g3 Nbd7 9.Bg2 dxc4 10.Qe2 then:
    • If 10...Nb6 11.0-0 Bb4 12.a3 Ba5 13.Bd2 then:
      • 13...0-0 14.Ne4 Bxd2 15.Nxd2 Qe7 16.Nxc4 Nxc4 17.Qxc4 e5 18.dxe5 Qxe5 19.b4 gives White more space and fewer pawn weaknesses; Black has a queenside majority, but he will have trouble using it (Hillarp Persson-Cheparinov, IT, Malm, 2007).
      • 13...Qe7 14.Ne4 Bxd2 15.Nxd2 e5 16.dxe5 Qxe5 17.Nxc4 Nxc4 18.Qxc4 Rd8 19.Rad1 0-0 20.b4 Nd7 21.a4 Nb6 22.Qc2 a6 23.h4 Qe7 24.Qb3 Rxd1 25.Rxd1 Rd8 26.Rxd8+ draw (Tkachiev-Dreev, IT, Poijovsky, 2007).
    • 10...Be7 11.Qxc4 e5 12.0-0 Nb6 13.Qe2 exd4 14.Rd1 0-0 15.Rxd4 Qc7 16.b3 Rad8 17.Rxd8 Rxd8 18.Bb2 Nfd5 19.Ne4 is equal (Sasikiran-Motylev, Corus B, 2007).

8...Nbd7 9.g3 Be7 10.b3

  • 10.f4 dxc4 11.Bxc4 0-0 12.e4 b5 13.Be2 b4 14.axb4 Bxb4 15.Be3 Qb6 16.0-0 gives White a small edge in space (Topalov-Kramnik, World Ch Match, Elista, 2006).

10...e5

  • 10...Ne4 11.Nxe4 dxe4 12.Qg4 Qa5+ 13.Bd2 Qf5 14.Qxf5 gxf5 15.Bg2 0-0-0 16.Ba5 is equal (Khairullin-Motylev, Russian Ch HL, Ulan Ude, 2009).

11.Bg2

  • If 11.cxd5 Nxd5 12.Nxd5 Qa5+ 13.Nc3 Qxc3+ 14.Bd2 Qb2 then:
    • 15.Bg2 exd4 16.exd4 Qxd4 17.0-0 0-0 18.Bb4 Qxd1 19.Rfxd1 Bxb4 20.Rxd7 Bc3 21.Rc1 gives White the more active game (Wang Yue-Bobras, Op, Cappelle la Grande, 2007).
    • 15.d5 cxd5 16.Bb5 a6 17.Bxd7+ Kxd7 18.0-0 e4 gives Black an extra pawn (Aronian-Ivanchuk, IT, Sofia, 2008).

11...dxc4

  • 11...e4 12.0-0 Nb6 13.Bd2 Qd7 14.c5 Nc8 15.f3 exf3 16.Qxf3 gives White the advantage in space in the center; Black's game is quite playable (Sasikiran-Svetushkin, Aeroflot Op, Moscow, 2007).

12.bxc4

  • The game is equal.

12...Nb6 13.Qd3 0-0!?

  • White cannot attack the e-file with a heavy piece, and therefore castling could be postponed if there is something better to do.
  • If 13...exd4! 14.exd4 Qd7 15.Be3 then:
    • 15...Ng4 16.Qe2 Nxe3 17.fxe3 Qe6 18.c5 remains equal.
    • If 15...Rh5!? 16.h4 Ra5 17.Bh3! then:
      • 17...Qc7 18.c5! Nbd5 19.Bd2 Qd8 20.Bg2 gives White more space and freedom.
      • 17...Qd8 18.a4 Bb4 19.0-0 Bxc3 20.Qxc3 Nc8 21.Rfe1 gives White a strong initiative.

14.0-0 exd4 15.exd4 c5?!

  • Black tries to break up White's pawn center.
  • If 15...Re8 then White contiues to enjoy the advantage in space after 16.Rd1 Qd7 17.a4 Rac8 18.a5 Na8 19.Bb2.

BLACK: Michael Roiz
!""""""""#
$r+ W Tl+%
$Oo+ VoO %
$ M + Mo+%
$+ O + + %
$ +pP + +%
$P Nq+ P %
$ + + PbP%
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/(((((((()

WHITE: Evgeny Tomashevsky
Position after 15...c6c5


16.d5!

  • This is clearly best. White gets a passed pawn.

16...Ne8

  • Black must now restrain the passer.

17.Ne4 f5 18.Nd2 Nd6 19.h4!?

  • White attempts to restrain Black's kingside. This isn't how it's done. With the Black Queen and Bishop on the d8/h5 diagonal, White cannot prevent Black from palying ...g5 in any case.
  • 19.Rb1! Bf6 20.Re1 Re8 21.Rxe8+ Qxe8 22.Bf1 gives Black more space, but his freedom is restricted by concern for White's passed pawn.

BLACK: Michael Roiz
!""""""""#
$t+ W Tl+%
$Oo+ + O %
$ M M Vo+%
$+ Op+o+ %
$ +p+ + P%
$P +q+ P %
$ + N Pb+%
$R B +rK %
/(((((((()

WHITE: Evgeny Tomashevsky
Position after 19.h2h4


19...Bf6!

  • Black has equaliized.
  • If 19...g5! then:
    • 20.h5 20...g4 21.Ra2 Bg5 22.Rc2 Qc7 23.Re1 is also equal.
    • 20.hxg5 Bxg5 21.Nb3 Rc8 22.Bxg5 Qxg5 is also equal.

20.Ra2

  • This is the fastest way for White to get his Rook into action.

20...Re8

  • 20...g5 21.hxg5 Bxg5 22.Rc2 Re8 23.Rd1 remains equal.

21.Rc2

  • 21.Rd1 g5 22.h5 Re7 23.g4 Qe8 24.Bh3 Bd4 remains equal.

21...Qd7?!

  • Black removes his Queen from the d8/h5 diagonal, which would make it possible for him to play ...g5 (see note to White's 19th move).
  • If 21...g5! 22.h5 then:
    • If 22...Qc7 23.Nf3 Qe7 24.Be3 then:
      • 24...g4 25.Nd2 Nd7 26.h6 gxh6 27.Bxh6 Ne5 28.Qb3 remains equal.
      • 24...Rac8!? 25.Rcc1! Bb2 26.Nxg5 Bxc1 27.Rxc1 Qd7 28.Ne6 gives White the active game in spite of a small material deficit.
    • 22...Nd7 23.Rd1 g4 24.Qb3 Re7 25.Nf1 Ne5 is equal.

22.Nb3!

  • White attacks a loose pawn.

22...Na4 23.Bf4

  • If 23.Qf3!? then Black starts looking for counterplay after 23...Re7 24.Be3 b6 25.Nd2 Rae8 26.Bf4 Nf7 with equality.

23...Rac8!?

  • The game is volatile, fluxuating between equality and an advantage for White.
  • 23...Rad8 24.Rb1 Re7 25.Be3 b6 26.Nd2 Rde8 27.Rcc1 restores the balance.

24.Nd2!

  • White intends to bring his Knight to f3, but for now the proud palidin will be content to keep the Black Rook out of e4. This secures the advantage for now.

24...Nb6 25.h5!

  • White boldly decides to take on Black's weak pawns on the kingside. The alternative is to attack the queenside.
  • If 25.Rb1 then:
    • If 25...Re7 then:
      • White seizes the initiative with 26.a4! Nxa4 27.Bxd6 Qxd6 28.Qa3 b5 29.cxb5!.
      • 26.Nb3 Na4 27.Na5 Be5 28.Bg5 Bf6 29.Be3 threatens 30.Qb3, making a target of Black's b-pawn.
    • 25...Nf7 26.Nf3 Re4 27.Be3 Nd6 28.Nd2 Re7 29.Nb3 gives White the initiative against Black's c-pawn.

25...gxh5 26.Bxd6 Qxd6 27.Qxf5 h4?

  • Black's final mistake is to allow White the opportunity for a passed pawn.
  • If 27...Bd4 28.Ne4! then:
    • 28...Qh6 29.Qg5 Qh7 30.Re2 Rb8 (prophylactic against Bg2h3) 31.Rd1 Kh8 32.Qh4 leaves White better, but Black has defensive resources and could launch counterplay if given the opportunity.
    • 28...Qe5 29.Qxe5 Rxe5 30.Nd6 Rc7 31.Nb5 Rce7 32.d6! gives White a strong initiative.

BLACK: Michael Roiz
!""""""""#
$ +t+t+l+%
$oo+ + O %
$ M W V +%
$+ Op+q+ %
$ +p+ + O%
$P + + P %
$ +rN Pb+%
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/(((((((()

WHITE: Evgeny Tomashevsky
Position after 27...h5h4


28.Ne4!

  • White nails it down.
  • Black was probably hoping for 28.gxh4!? Bxh4 29.Ne4 when:
    • If 29...Qh6 then after 30.Rd1 Re7 31.d6 Rf7 32.Qh3 White is still better, but Black is back in the game
    • 29...Qd8 30.d6 Rf8 31.Qh5 Rf4 32.Rd2 Nd7 33.Re1 threatens 34.Nxc5 and, if 34...Rxc5, 35.Re8+! winning the Queen.

28...Qe5

  • If 28...Qe7 29.Nxf6+ gxf6 30.Qg6+ then:
    • If 30...Qg7 31.Qxg7+ Kxg7 32.gxh4 then:
      • 32...Rh8 33.Re1 Rxh4 34.Re7+ Kg6 35.Rxb7 Re8 36.Rc1 leaves White a pawn to the good and in position to get more.
      • 32...Re5 33.Kh2 Kf7 34.Kh3 Rh8 35.Bf3 Nc8 36.h5 gives White an extra pawn and a strong passer; note that if Black takes the pawn with either Rook, White wins the exchange.
    • 30...Kf8 31.Rc3 Qf7 32.Qh6+ Ke7 33.Re3+ Kd8 34.Bh3 wins for White.

29.Qg6!

  • Also good is 29.Qxe5 Rxe5 30.gxh4 Bxh4 31.f4 Re7 32.d6.

29...Nd7

  • No better is 29...Re7 30.Nxf6+ Qxf6 31.Qxf6 gxf6 32.gxh4, giving White a passed pawn.

30.Re2 Be7 31.Rfe1 Nf8 32.Qg4 1-0

  • If 32...Qd4 then after 33.Rd2 Qxc4 34.d6 wins a piece for White.
  • Mr. Roiz resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 05:04 PM
Response to Reply #2
6. Gelfand - Nakamura, Round 5
This is only January, but this will go down as one of the best games played this year.



Hikaru Nakamura
Photo: ChessBase.com


Boris Gelfand (Israel) - Hikaru Nakamura (United States)
World Team Championship, Round 5/Board 1
Bursa, 9 January 2010

West India Game: King's Indian Defense (Main Line)


1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Be2 e5 7.0-0 Nc6

  • If 7...Nbd7 then:
    • If 8.Be3 c6 then:
      • If 9.d5 c5 10.Ne1 Ne8 then:
        • 11.Nd3 f5 12.f4 b6 13.Qd2 Qe7 14.Bf3 g5 15.fxg5 f4 16.Bf2 Qxg5 17.b4 Ndf6 is equal (Batchuluun-Li Shilong, Asian Ch, Manila, 2007).
        • 11.g4 f5 12.gxf5 gxf5 13.exf5 Nb6 14.Nf3 Bxf5 15.Ng5 Nf6 16.Kh1 Qe7 17.Rg1 Kh8 18.Rg3 e4 19.Qd2 Nfd7 is equal (Shen Yang-Li Shilong, Asian Ch, Manila, 2007).
      • If 9.Qc2 Ng4 10.Bg5 f6 then:
        • 11.Bd2 f5 12.exf5 gxf5 13.dxe5 dxe5 14.Ng5 Ndf6 15.Rad1 Qe7 16.c5 Kh8 17.b4 gives White a small advantage in space (Uhlmann-Knaak, IT, Halle, 1981).
        • If 11.Bh4 Nh6 then:
          • 12.dxe5 dxe5 13.b4 Nf7 14.Nd2 Qe7 15.c5 Re8 16.Nb3 gives White the advantage in space (Kotronias-Skalkotas, Op, Athens, 1988).
          • 12.Rad1 Qe7 13.b4 Nf7 14.dxe5 dxe5 15.c5 Re8 16.Nd2 Nf8 17.f3 Ne6 18.Nb3 gives White the advantage in space (W. Schmidt-Ingo, Op, Dresden, 1993).
    • If 8.Qc2 c6 9.Rd1 Qe7 10.d5 c5 then:
      • If 11.Bg5 h6 then:
        • 12.Bh4 g5 13.Bg3 Nh5 14.Nd2 Nf4 15.Nf1 Nf6 16.Ne3 Nxe4 17.Nxe4 f5 18.Nc3 Nxe2+ 19.Qxe2 f4 20.Nf1! fxg3 21.Nxg3 Bd7 22.Nge4 Bf5 is equal (SWmagin-Kochyev, Voronez, 1987).
        • 12.Bd2 Ne8 13.g3 Nb6 14.Nh4 Kh7 15.a3 Bh3 16.b4 Nd7 17.Rab1 Rc8 18.Be3 Bf6 19.Nf3 Bg7 20.Nh4 draw (Scho-Hitselberger, Cyberspace, 1997).
      • 11.g3 Ne8 12.Nh4 Bf6 13.Ng2 Ng7 14.h4 h5 15.Rb1 b6 16.a3 Ba6 17.Qa4 Bb7 18.b4 Rfc8 19.Be3 Ne8 is equal (Hertneck-Vogt, Austrian ChT, Vienna, 2004).
    • If 8.Re1 c6 9.Bf1 then:
      • 9...Re8 10.d5 c5 11.a3 Rf8 12.g3 Ne8 13.b4 h6 14.Nh4 Ndf6 15.bxc5 dxc5 16.a4 a5 17.Rb1 Nd6 18.Ba3 b6 19.Qb3 Ra6 20.Qc2 Nh7 21.Nb5 Ng5 22.Kh1 Nxb5 23.cxb5 Ra7 24.Bb2 Qd6 25.Qd2 Re7 is equal (Christoffel-Boleslavsky, IT, Gronigen, 1946).
      • 9...exd4 10.Nxd4 Re8 11.Rb1 Nc5 12.f3 a5 13.Be3 Nfd7 14.Qd2 Ne5 15.Red1 Qe7 16.Nb3 a4 17.Nxc5 dxc5 18.Rbc1 Be6 19.Qc2 Bxc4 20.Nxa4 b5 21.Nb6 Rxa2 22.Nxc4 bxc4 23.Bxc4 Rxb2 gives White an extra pawn (Filip-Tolush, IT, Bucharest, 1953).
  • If 7...Na6 then:
    • If 8.Be3 Ng4 9.Bg5 Qe8 10.dxe5 dxe5 11.h3 then:
      • If 11...f6 12.Bd2 Nh6 13.c5 then:
        • If 13...c6 14.Bxa6 bxa6 15.Bxh6 Bxh6 16.Qa4 Rb8 17.b3 Rf7 18.Rfd1 Bf8 19.Qa5 Be6 20.Rd3 Rd7 21.Rxd7 Qxd7 22.Qxa6 Bxc5 23.Rd1 Qc8 24.Qxc8+ Rxc8 is equal (Pentala-Moradiabadi, Op, Dubai, 2004).
        • 13...Nxc5 14.Qc1 Nf7 15.Nd5 Ne6 16.Nxc7 Nxc7 17.Qxc7 Nd8 18.Rfc1 Be6 19.b4 Rf7 20.Qc3 Bf8 21.Qb2 a6 draw (Ris-Bromberger, Bundesliga 0809, Tegernsee, 2009).
      • If 11...h6 12.Bd2 Nf6 13.Be3 Qe7 then:
        • 14.a3 c6 15.b4 Nh5 16.Re1 Nf4 17.Bf1 Qf6 18.Ra2 Rd8 19.Rd2 Rxd2 20.Qxd2 Be6 21.b5 Nc7 22.bxc6 bxc6 23.Qd6 Rc8 24.Bxf4 exf4 25.e5 Qd8 26.Ne4 Ne8 27.Qb4 Bf8 28.Qa4 gives White the advantage in space (Yevseev-A. Zhigalko, Op, Cappelle la Grande, 2006).
        • 14.Nd5 Qd8 15.Nxf6+ Qxf6 16.c5 Nb8 17.b4 Nc6 18.b5 Rd8 19.Qc1 Nd4 20.Bxd4 exd4 21.Bd3 Be6 is equal (Gustafsson-Polzin, Austrian ChT, Graz, 2002).
    • If 8.Re1 c6 9.Bf1 then:
      • If 9...Bg4 10.d5 then:
        • 10...c5 11.h3 Bd7 12.Bg5 Kh8 13.a3 Qb8 14.Qc2 Ng8 15.Bd3 f6 16.Bh4 Nh6 17.Rf1 Qd8 18.Nd2 Nf7 19.Bg3 Bh6 20.Ne2 Qe7 21.Rae1 Rae8 gives Black a small edge in space (Miles-Cramling, IT, Malm, 1996).
        • 10...Nb4 11.Be2 a5 12.Bg5 then:
          • If 12...h6 13.Be3 c5 14.g3 Bd7 15.Nh4 Kh7 16.a3 Na6 17.Bd3 Ng4 18.Bd2 Bf6 19.Ng2 h5 20.Qc1 Bg7 21.f3 Nh6 22.Nd1 Nc7 23.a4 Na6 24.Nf2 Nb4 is equal (W. Schmidt-Kempinski, Polish Ch, Gdansk, 1994).
          • 12...Na6 13.h3 Bd7 14.Nd2 Kh8 15.a3 Qb6 16.Be3 c5 17.Nb5 Ng8 18.f4 Bh6 19.Rf1 Rae8 20.Qb3 is equal (Kransenkow-Kozul, Ol, Bled, 2002).
      • 9...exd4 10.Nxd4 Ng4 11.h3 Qb6 12.hxg4 Qxd4 13.g5 then:
        • If 13...Qxd1 14.Rxd1 Be5 15.Be3 Nc5 16.f3 a5 17.Rac1 a4 is equal (Carlsen-Stokke, Norwegian Ch, Moss, 2006).
        • 13...Nc5 14.Bf4 Qxd1 15.Raxd1 Be5 16.Bh2 Re8 17.Rxd6 Bxd6 18.Bxd6 b6 19.b4 gives White the initiative (Sakaev-Kokarov, Russian Ch HL, Krasnoyarsk, 2007).
  • If 7...exd4 8.Nxd4 Re8 9.f3 then:
    • If 9...c6 10.Kh1 Nbd7 11.Bg5 h6 12.Bh4 Ne5 then:
      • 13.Nc2 Qe7 14.c5 dxc5 15.f4 Ned7 16.e5 Nxe5 17.fxe5 Qxe5 18.Bf3 Be6 19.Qd2 Nd5 20.Rae1 Qf4 is equal (V. Samigin-Gligoric, TMatch, Rijeka, 1963).
      • 13.Qc2 g5 14.Bf2 c5 15.Nf5 Bxf5 16.exf5 Nc6 17.Rad1 Re5 18.Rd2 is equal (O'Donnell-Jones, Corres, 1991).
    • If 9...Nc6 10.Be3 Nh5 11.Qd2 then:
      • 11...Nf4 12.Rfd1 Nxd4 13.Bxd4 Bxd4+ 14.Qxd4 Nxe2+ 15.Nxe2 b6 16.Nc3 Bb7 17.Nd5 Bxd5 18.cxd5 Qg5 19.Rac1 Re7 20.Qd2 Qh5 21.g4 Qh4 22.Qf2 Qg5 23.Qd2 Qh4 24.Kh1 Rf8 25.Rg1 h5 26.Rc3 gives White more activity (Jakovenko-Volokitin, IT, Foros, 2008).
      • 11...f5 12.Nxc6 bxc6 then:
        • 13.exf5 Bxf5 14.Bd4 Nf6 15.Rfe1 c5 16.Bf2 Qd7 17.Rad1 Qf7 18.b3 a6 19.Bf1 Bd7 20.Rxe8+ Bxe8 21.a3 is equal (Kramnik-Glek, EU Cup, Berlin, 1996).
        • 13.c5 d5 14.Bg5 Qd7 15.Rad1 Rb8 16.g4 Nf6 17.exd5 Nxd5 18.Bc4 Bb7 19.h3 Kh8 20.b3 gives White the advantage in space (V/ Popov-Plenkovic, Euro Ch, Budva, 2009).

8.d5 Ne7 9.Nd2

  • If 9.b4 then:
    • If 9...Nh5 then:
      • If 10.c5 Nf4 11.Bxf4 exf4 12.Rc1 h6 then:
        • If 13.Nd4 then:
          • 13...a6 14.h3 Kh8 15.Qd2 Ng8 16.Rfd1 h5 17.Qxf4 Bh6 18.Qg3 h4 19.Qd3 Bxc1 20.Rxc1 Black has the exchange, but White has a huge advantage in space (Ivanchuk-Grischuk, Grand Prix, Nalchik, 2009).
          • If 13...g5 14.Bh5 then:
            • 14...c6 15.Nb3 cxd5 16.exd5 a5 17.Nb5 a4 18.Na5 dxc5 19.d6 gives White the initiative (Bekiavsky-Romero, IT, Leon, 1994).
            • 14...Kh8 15.Re1 Ng8 16.h3 Nf6 17.Bf3 Re8 18.cxd6 cxd6 19.Ncb5 Re7 20.Rxc8 Rxc8 is equal (S. Ivanov-I. Smirin, Aeroflot Op, Moscow, 2003).
        • 13.h3 g5 14.a4 Ng6 15.a5 Re8 16.Nd2 f5 17.cxd6 cxd6 18.exf5 Bxf5 19.Nb5 Bb2 20.Rc4 is equal (Sosonko-van Wely, Dutch Ch, Hilversum, 1995).
      • If 10.Re1 f5 11.Ng5 Nf6 12.Bf3 c6 then:
        • 13.Be3 h6 14.Ne6 Bxe6 15.dxe6 fxe4 16.Nxe4 Nxe4 17.Bxe4 d5 18.cxd5 cxd5 19.Bc2 b6 20.Qg4 e4 21.Rad1 Qc7 22.Bb3 Rad8 draw (Nyback-Radjabov, Euro ChT, Plovdiv, 2003).
        • 13.Bb2 cxd5 14.cxd5 fxe4 15.Ngxe4 Nxe4 16.Nxe4 Nf5 17.Rc1 Bd7 18.Qb3 Bh6 19.Rc6 bxc6 20.dxc6+ Kh8 21.cxd7 Qxd7 22.Nf6 gives White compensation for the sacrificed exchange (Laznicka-G. Jones, Euro ChT, Crete, 2007).
      • If 10.g3 f5 11.Ng5 Nf6 12.f3 then:
        • 12...f4 13.b5 fxg3 14.hxg3 Nh5 15.Kf2 Nf4 16.gxf4 exf4 17.Qd3 gives White the advantage in space (van Wely-Dyachkov, Russian ChT, Sochi, 2008).
        • If 12...c6 13.b5 h6 14.Ne6 Bxe6 15.dxe6 then:
          • 15...Ne8 16.bxc6 bxc6 17.Ba3 c5 18.Qa4 Nc7 19.Qd7 Qxd7 20.exd7 Nc6 21.Bd1 f4 22.Ba4 Nd4 23.Kg2 Bf6 24.Bc1 gives White the advantage in space and an advanced passer under protection (van Wely-Lenz, Op, Munich, 1992).
          • 15...c5 16.Nd5 Ne8 17.exf5 gxf5 18.Rb1 Nc7 19.Nxc7 Qxc7 20.g4 Rf6 21.gxf5 Nxf5 Black must win the e-pawn (W. Schmidt-Antoniewski, Polish ChT, Suwalki, 1999).
  • If 9...a5 10.Ba3 then:
    • If 10...axb4 11.Bxb4 Nd7 12.a4 Bh6 13.a5 f5 14.Nd2 then:
      • If 14...Nf6 15.c5 Bxd2 16.Qxd2 then:
        • 16...fxe4 17.cxd6 cxd6 18.Nb5 Nf5 19.Rac1 Rf7 20.g4 Nd4 21.Nxd4 exd4 22.Qxd4 Bxg4 23.Bxg4 Nxg4 24.Qxe4 Nxf2 25.Qe3 is equal (Kobalia-Ulko, Aeroflot Open, Moscow, 2002).
        • 16...Nxe4 17.Nxe4 fxe4 18.Bc3 Nf5 19.Ra4 e3 20.fxe3 Bd7 21.Raa1 Qg5 22.e4 Qxd2 23.Bxd2 Nd4 24.Bc4 gives White a small advantage in space (Savina-Bodnaruk, Russian ChU20W, St. Petersburg, 2008).
      • 14...Kh8 15.Bd3 Ng8 16.Qc2 Rf7 17.Na4 fxe4 18.Nxe4 Ndf6 19.Nac3 Bf5 20.Ng3 Bxd3 21.Qxd3 Qf8 22.Rab1 Qc8 23.Rb3 Qg4 24.f3 Qd4+ 25.Qxd4 exd4 26.Nd1 Bg7 27.Bd2 gives White the advantage in space (Pelletier-Renet, EU ChT, Pula, 1997).
    • 10...b6 11.bxa5 Nh5 12.Re1 f5 13.Bb4 bxa5 14.Ba3 Nf4 15.Bf1 fxe4 16.Nd2 Nd3 17.Bxd3 exd3 18.Nde4 Nf5 19.Qxd3 Nd4 20.Nb5 Rb8 21.Bc1 Bf5 22.a4 is equal (Borsuk-Schoene, OlW, Dresden, 2008).

9...Ne8 10.b4 f5 11.c5 Nf6

  • 11...Kh8 12.a4 Ng8 13.Ba3 Ngf6 14.b5 fxe4 15.Ndxe4 Bf5 16.Ng3 e4 17.c6! gives White the advantage in space (Babula-Vokac, Czech Ch, Karlovy Vary, 2005).

12.f3 f4 13.Nc4 g5 14.a4

  • 14.Ba3 Ng6 15.b5 Ne8 16.b6 axb6 17.cxb6 cxb6 18.Qb3 h5 19.Rab1 g4 20.Nxb6 Qh4 21.Nxc8 Rxc8 22.Rfc1 Qg5 23.Nb5 Rd8 24.Nc7 gives White the advantage in space (Shirov-Akopian, Soviet Ch -final, Daugavpils, 1989).

14...Ng6 15.Ba3

  • 15.cxd6 cxd6 16.Nb5 Ne8 17.Bd2 Rf7 18.Be1 Bd7 19.Bf2 Bxb5 20.axb5 gives White the advantage in space (M. Gurevich-Shirov, Op, Wijk aan Zee, 1993).

15...Rf7 16.b5 dxc5

  • 16...Bf8 17.b6 dxc5 18.bxc7 Rxc7 19.Nb5 Rg7 20.d6 Be6 21.Bb2 Ne8 22.Nxe5 a6 23.d7 Nf6 24.Nxg6 hxg6 is equal (Rasmussen-P. H. Nielsen, Politiken Cup, Helsignor, 2007).

17.Bxc5 h5 18.a5 g4 19.b6 g3 20.Kh1 Bf8

  • 20...Nh7!? 21.d6 Qh4 22.Bg1 Bh3 then:
    • 23.bxc7? Bxg2+! 24.Kxg2 Qh3+ 25.Kxh3 Ng5+ 26.Kg2 Nh4+ White resigns Black gives mate on the next move (Ftacnik-Cvitan, Bundesliga 9798, Germany, 1997).
    • 23.gxh3 Qxh3 24.Rf2 gxf2 25.Bxf2 cxb6 26.axb6 a6 Black is an exchange to the good, but White still has lots of counterplay.

21.d6!?

  • 21.Bg1 Nh4 22.Re1 Nxg2 23.Kxg2 Rg7 24.Nxe5 gxh2+ 25.Kh1 Nxe4 White resigns as 26.Bd4 Ng3+ 27.Kg2 Bh3+ 28.Kxh2 Qh3! is followed soon by mate (Roussel Roozman-Charbonneau, IT, Montreal, 2008).

21...axb6

  • Black has an extra pawn.

22.Bg1!?

  • The retreat is to Black's advantage.
  • More interesting, if not better, is 22.axb6 Rxa1 23.Qxa1 cxd6 when:
    • 24.Rd1! Rd7 25.Qa2 Kh7 26.Ba3 is unclear: Black has an extra pawn, but White has a small edge in space.
    • If 24.Ba3!? gxh2 25.Rd1 Ne8 then:
      • If 26.Nb5 Be6 27.Bxd6 Nxd6 28.Nbxd6 Rd7 gives Black an extra pawn, but White has the advantage in space.
      • 26.Rd2 Be6 27.Kxh2 Rg7 28.Bf1 Nh4 29.Kh1 Rg3 gives Black an extra pawn and pressure n White's King.

22...Nh4?!

  • Black fails to find the best move.
  • 22...gxh2!? 23.Bxh2 bxa5 24.Nb5 c6 25.Nc7 Rb8 gives Black two extra pawns, but White has more space.

23.Re1?

  • White misses an opportunity to gain a strong position.
  • If 23.hxg3! fxg3 24.Qe1 Nxg2 25.dxc7 then:
    • If 25...Qe7 26.Qxg3+ Rg7 27.Qxe5 Qxe5 28.Nxe5 bxa5 29.Bc4+ gives White a powerful position.
    • If 25...Qxc7!? 26.Qxg3+ Rg7 then:
      • If 27.axb6 Rxa1 28.Rxa1 then:
        • 28...Qd7 29.Qh2 Bb4 30.Nxe5 Qh3 31.Nd5 Nxd5 32.exd5 gives White a passed pawn for the ending.
        • 28...Qf7 29.Qxe5 Nd7 30.Qd5 Nf4 31.Qxf7+ Kxf7 32.Ra8 gives White a won position.
      • If 27.Bxb6 Rxg3 28.Bxc7 then:
        • 28...Nf4 29.Rg1 Rxg1+ 30.Rxg1+ Kf7 31.Nxe5+ gives White an extra pawn and a strong attack.
        • 28...Bb4 29.Bxe5 Nf4 30.Rg1 Nxe2 31.Nxe2 gives White an extra pawn and a winning position.

BLACK: Hikaru Nakamura
!""""""""#
$t+vW Vl+%
$+oO + + %
$ O P + +%
$P + O +o%
$ +n+pO M%
$+ N +pO %
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/(((((((()

WHITE: Boris Gelfand
Position after 23.Rf1e1


23...Nxg2!!

  • This surprising sacrifice appears to decide matters.
  • 23...bxa5 24.hxg3 fxg3 25.Nxe5 Qxd6 26.Bd4 Rg7 is equal.

24.dxc7

  • If 24.Kxg2 Qd7 25.Bf1 Rg7 26.Qd2 h4 then:
    • If 27.Kh1 h3 28.hxg3 fxg3 then:
      • 29.Bd3 Qf7 30.Nxe5 Bxd6 31.Bd4 g2+ gives Black a powerful a pwerrfull advanced passer duo.
      • 29.Re2 g2+ 30.Bxg2 hxg2+ 31.Rxg2 bxa5 32.Nxe5 Qxd6 gives Black an extra pawn.
    • 27.Bxb6 cxb6 28.Nxb6 h3+ 29.Kg1 Qxd6 30.Qxd6 Bxd6 doesn't leave White under a threat of a quick mate, as does the text, but he still has no time to carry out his own threats.

24...Nxe1!

  • Black goes an exchange to the good and threatens 25...g2#.

25.Qxe1 g2+

  • Black takes the scenic route home, where his Queen will remains en prise for a total of seven moves, starting with White's 24th, yet White has no time to take it.
  • Also good is 25...Qxc7 26.Bxb6 Rg7 27.hxg3 Qd7 28.Bf1 fxg3 when Black wins.

26.Kxg2 Rg7+ 27.Kh1 Bh3 28.Bf1

  • If 28.Bxb6 Bg2+ 29.Kg1 Bxf3+ 30.Kf1 Bg2+ then:
    • 31.Kf2 Nxe4+ 32.Nxe4 Qh4+ is an easy win for Black (in this variation, the Queen is en prise for nine moves).
    • If 31.Kg1 Qxc7 then:
      • 32.Na4 Qc6 33.Nxe5 Bh3+ 34.Bg4 Qxe4 wins for Black.
      • 32.Bxc7 then Black wins back the Queen with 32...Bc5+! 33.Qf2 Bh3+ 34.Kh1 Bxf2.

BLACK: Hikaru Nakamura
!""""""""#
$t+ W Vl+%
$+o+ + T %
$ O + M +%
$P + O +o%
$ +n+pO +%
$+ N +p+v%
$ + + + P%
$R + QbBk%
/(((((((()

WHITE: Boris Gelfand
Position after 28.Be2f1


28...Qd3!!

  • The Queen is still en prise, and still cannot be taken.

29.Nxe5

  • If 29.Bxd3 then 29...Bg2#.

29...Bxf1 30.Qxf1

  • 30.Ra2 Qa6 31.Bxb6 Bd6 32.c8Q+ Rxc8 hurts to watch.

30...Qxc3

  • At last, the Queen is en prise no longer. Black is a Rook to the good.

31.Rc1 Qxe5 32.c8Q Rxc8 33.Rxc8 Qe6 0-1

  • Black remains a piece to the good.
  • Mr. Gelfand resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 07:44 PM
Response to Reply #2
7. Milos - Ganguly, Round 9
India took the bronze medal by defeating Brazil in the last round.



Surya Shekhar Ganguly
Photo: ChessBase.com


Gilberto Milos (Brazil) - Surya Shekhar Ganguly (India)
World Team Championship, Round 9/Board 3
Bursa, 13 January 2010

Spanish Grand Royal Game: Neo-Classical Defense


1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.a4 Rb8 8.c3 d6 9.d4 Bb6


10.a5

  • If 10.axb5 axb5 11.h3 0-0 12.Re1 h6 13.Be3 Bd7 14.Nbd2 Re8 15.Qb1 b4 16.Qc2 gives White the advantage in space (Kamsky-Z.Almasi, IT, Reggio Emilia, 2010).

10...Ba7 11.Be3

  • If 11.h3 0-0 12.Be3 then:
    • 12...exd4 13.cxd4 Nxe4 14.Qc2 Qe8 15.Nc3 Nf6 16.Rfe1 Qd7 17.Ne4 Nxe4 18.Qxe4 Ne7 19.Ng5 Ng6 20.Bd5 c5 is equal (Timofeev-Halkias, Euro Ch, Dresden, 2007).
    • 12...Ra8 13.Nbd2 Bb7 14.Bc2 exd4 15.cxd4 Re8 16.Bb1 is equal (Ganguly-Shirov, IT, Barcelona, 2009).

11...Bg4 12.dxe5!?

  • If 12.Nbd2 0-0 13.h3 Bh5 then:
    • 14.dxe5 dxe5 15.Bxa7 Nxa7 16.g4 Nxg4 17.hxg4 Bxg4 18.Kg2 Qf6 19.Qe1 Rbd8 20.Qe3 Nc6 21.Nh2 Qh4 22.Ndf3 Qh3+ 23.Kh1 Rd6 24.Rg1 Rg6 25.Bd5 Black resigns (Smeets-Ris, Op, Hoogeveen, 2007).
    • 14.Qc2 Re8 15.Rfe1 exd4 16.cxd4 Nb4 17.Qc3 c5 18.Bg5 h6 19.Bxf6 Qxf6 20.e5 dxe5 21.dxc5 Bxf3 22.Qxb4 Ba8 draw (Timofeev-Shirov, Russian ChT, Dagomys, 2009).

12...Bxf3

  • The game is equal.

13.gxf3!?

  • White voluntarily spoils his own pawn structure.
  • 13.Qxf3 Nxe5 14.Qg3 Bxe3 15.Qxe3 0-0 remains equal.

13...dxe5 14.Qe2

  • If 14.Bg5 h6 15.Bh4 g5 16.Bg3 Qe7 then:
    • 17.Qc1 Rd8 18.Re1 Nh5 19.Bd5 Rd6 gives Black the advantage in space and fewer pawn weaknesses.
    • 17.Bd5 Nxd5 18.exd5 Rd8 gives Black a comfortable advantage in space.

14...0-0

  • If 14...Bxe3 15.Qxe3 Qe7 then:
    • 16.f4 Rd8 17.f3 0-0 18.Bc2 exf4 19.Qxf4 Rfe8 gives Black stronger pawns.
    • 16.Rd1 Rd8 17.Rxd8+ Qxd8 18.f4 0-0 19.Bc2 Qd7 gives Black more space and fewer pawn weaknesses.

15.Nd2 Nh5

  • Black's Knight is headed for the weak point at f4.
  • A good alternative is 15...Bxe3 16.fxe3 Qe7 then:
    • If 17.Bc2 Rfd8 18.Nb3 Rd7 19.Rad1 Rbd8 then:
      • 20.f4 Rxd1 21.Rxd1 Rxd1+ 22.Qxd1 Qe6 gives Black stronger pawns and more freedom.
      • 20.Rxd7 Nxd7 21.Qg2 Nc5 22.Ra1 b4 gives Black the advantage in space.
    • 17.Bd5 Qd7 18.Ba2 Nxa5 19.Bxf7+ Qxf7 20.Rxa5 Rb6 gives Black the advantage in space.

16.Kh1 Qh4 17.Rg1

  • 17.Bxa7 Nxa7 18.Qe3 Nc6 19.Rg1 Nf4 20.Bd5 Ne7 gives Black better minor pieces and stronger pawns.

17...Nf4 18.Bxf4 exf4

  • If 18...Qxf4!? 19.Rg4! Qh6 20.Bd5 then:
    • 20...Ne7 21.Rag1 g6 22.Ba2 Rbd8 23.f4 exf4 gives Black an extra pawn and more space.
    • If 20...Rfd8!? 21.Rag1! then:
      • 21...Nxa5 22.Rxg7+ Qxg7 23.Rxg7+ Kxg7 24.f4 is equal.
      • The more basic 21...g6 22.f4 Ne7 23.Ba2 is also equal.

19.e5?

  • White never recovers from this inaccuracy. His pawn structure is spoiled and he should seek compensation in activity for his pieces.
  • 19.Rg2 Ne5 20.Rag1 g6 21.Bd5 Rbd8 22.Bb7 Nd3 leaves Black better, but White has a more playable game than he gets from other alternatives.
  • 19.Rg4!? consumes too much time and after 19...Qxf2! 20.Qxf2 Bxf2 21.Bd5 Ne5 22.Rxf4 Nd3! Black is much better.

BLACK: Surya Shekhar Ganguly
!""""""""#
$ T + Tl+%
$V O +oOo%
$o+ + + +%
$Po+ P + %
$ + + O +%
$+bP +p+ %
$ P NqW P%
$R + + Rk%
/(((((((()

WHITE: Gilberto Milos
Position after 19...e4e5


19...Qxf2!

  • If White wants to sacrifice a pawn in a Queen exchange, then Black is up to seeing what that is about.

20.Qxf2 Bxf2 21.Rg2 Be3!

  • Black can easily put a Rook on the d-file, gaining time on the Knight.

22.e6

  • White has no choice other than to surrender another pawn.
  • If 22.Ne4? then Black gains a second pawn after 22...Nxe5 23.Nf6+ Kh8 24.Nd5 b4 25.cxb4 Nxf3.

22...fxe6 23.Bxe6+ Kh8

  • Black has emerged with an extra pawn.

24.Ne4

  • If 24.Re2 then after 24...Ne5! 25.Kg2 Rf6 26.Ba2 Rg6+ 27.Kh1 Rd8 Black wins at least another pawn.

24...Ne5 25.Rf1

  • Black's initiative is so strong that White can only put up a passive defense.

25...Rbe8 26.Bg4 Nc4 27.Ng5

  • This loses, but so does everything else.
  • If 27.Re2 Re5 28.b4 h5 29.Bh3 g5 30.Rd1 g4 then:
    • 31.Bg2 Rxe4!! 32.fxe4 f3 33.Ra2 fxg2+ 34.Kxg2 gives Black two p
    • If 31.Rg2 then:
      • If 31...gxf3 then after 32.Rg6 Rxe4 33.Rd7 Ne5 Black wins at least the exchange.
      • If 31...gxh3 32.Rg6 Rxe4 33.fxe4 Nd2 then:
        • If 34.Rh6+ then after 34...Kg7 35.Rxa6 f3 the f-pawn cannot be stopped.
        • If 34.e5 then White is crushed after 34...f3 35.Rxa6 f2.
  • If 27.b4 Ba7 28.Re2 Ne3 29.Rg1 Re7 then:
    • If 30.Bh3 g6 31.Rge1 Rd8 32.Rd2 Rxd2 33.Nxd2 Re8 Black retains an extra pawn and a Knight on the sixth rank crippling White's defense.
    • If 30.h4 Rfe8 31.Bh3 g6 then:
      • If 32.h5 gxh5 33.Nf6 Rf8 then:
        • 34.Ne4 Rxe4!! 35.fxe4 f3! the pawn keeps coming.
        • 34.Nxh5 Re5 35.Ng7 Rg8 36.Rd2 Nc4 wins easily for Black.
      • 32.Nf6 Rf8 33.Ne4 Rd8 34.Kh2 Nf5 35.Rg4 Ng3 Black's Rooks are ready to jump into White's camp.

27...Ba7 28.Rb1

  • If 28.Ne6 then Black remains a pawn to the good after 28...Rf7 29.Re1 Ne3 30.Rd2 Nxg4.

BLACK: Surya Shekhar Ganguly
!""""""""#
$ + +tT L%
$V O + Oo%
$o+ + + +%
$Po+ + N %
$ +m+ Ob+%
$+ P +p+ %
$ P + +rP%
$+r+ + +k%
/(((((((()

WHITE: Gilberto Milos
Position after 28.Rf1b1


28...Ne3!

  • The octupus has landed. Black will take it slow and steady from here.

29.Rgg1 h6 30.Ne4 Re5 31.Bh3

  • 31.b3 c5 32.h4 c4 33.bxc4 Nxc4 34.Rgd1 Bc5 is hopeless for White.

31...g5 32.Bg4 Rd8 33.Bh5 Rd3 34.Rbe1

  • 34.h4 Nf5 35.Rgd1 Rxd1+ 36.Rxd1 gxh4 37.Rd8+ Kg7 nets Black another pawn.

BLACK: Surya Shekhar Ganguly
!""""""""#
$ + + + L%
$V O + + %
$o+ + + O%
$Po+ T Ob%
$ + +nO +%
$+ PtMp+ %
$ P + + P%
$+ + R Rk%
/(((((((()

WHITE: Gilberto Milos
Position after 34.Rb1e1


34...Nc4!

  • The discovered attack on the Rook at g1 combined with an attack on the b-pawn provides a little tactical finesse.

35.Rg2 Ne3

  • If 35...Re3 36.Rxe3 fxe3 37.b4 c5 then:
    • 38.Re2 cxb4 39.cxb4 Rd5 40.Bf7 Rd1+ puts Black's Rook behind White's queenside pawns, which are now doomed.
    • If 38.Rg1 Nb2 then:
      • 39.h4 cxb4 40.cxb4 Nd3 41.Rg2 gxh4 42.Bg4 Nxb4 leaves Black three pawns to the good.
      • 39.bxc5 Nd3 40.c6 Bb8 41.Bg4 e2 the pawn will queen and win the Rook.

36.Rgg1

  • No better is 36.Rge2 Kg7 37.h3 Nc4 38.Ra1 Nd6 39.Rae1 Re3.

36...Nc2

  • Also good is 36...c5! 37.h4 c4 38.Nf6 Re6 39.hxg5 hxg5.

37.Rd1

  • 37.Re2!? Bxg1 38.Rxc2 Be3 wins the exchange for Black.

37...Red5 38.Rxd3 Rxd3 39.Rc1

  • White could put up more stubborn resistance after 39.Rb1 Ne3 40.b4 Nd5 41.Re1 Be3 42.Bg6 Nxc3.

39...Ne3 40.Bf7 g4 41.Nf2

  • White could put up better resistance after 41.fxg4 Nxg4 42.Be6 Nf2+ 43.Nxf2 Bxf2.

41...Rd2 42.Nxg4 Nxg4 43.fxg4 Rxb2!

  • Black can now create a passer on the queenside.

44.Bd5 Be3 45.Rd1 c5 46.h4

  • White strives to create a passed pawn on the kingside, but it's too little and too late.

BLACK: Surya Shekhar Ganguly
!""""""""#
$ + + + L%
$+ + + + %
$o+ + + O%
$PoOb+ + %
$ + + OpP%
$+ P V + %
$ R + + +%
$+ +r+ +k%
/(((((((()

WHITE: Gilberto Milos
Position after 46.h2h4


46...c4!

  • Black calmly ignores White's "threat: to create a passer and continues to follow his winning plan.
  • 46...b4!? 47.cxb4 cxb4 48.Bc4! b3 49.Rd8+ Kg7 50.Rb8 wins the b-pawn and gives White faint hope of salvaging the game.

47.g5 hxg5 48.hxg5 Bd2 49.Kg2 b4 0-1

  • 50.cxb4 c3 51.Rh1+ Kg7 52.Be4 c2 wins for Black.
  • O senhor Milos resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 07:45 PM
Response to Reply #2
8. Aronian - Nakamura, Round 8
This is the game that knocked the US out of first place.



Levon Aronian
Photo: ChessBase.com


Levon Aronian (Armenia) - Hikaru Nakamura (United States)
World Team Championship, Round 8/Board 1
Bursa, 12 January 2010

West India Game: King's Indian Defense (Catalan Opening)


1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Nc3 d6 5.e4 0-0 6.Be2 e5 7.0-0 Nc6 8.d5 Ne7 9.Ne1

  • For a survey of this opening up to here, see Ivanchuk-Grischuk, Grand Prix, Nalchik, 2009.
  • If 9.b4 then:
    • If 9...Nh5 then:
      • If 10.c5 Nf4 11.Bxf4 exf4 12.Rc1 h6 then:
        • If 13.Nd4 then:
          • 13...a6 14.h3 Kh8 15.Qd2 is equal (Ivanchuk-Grischuk, Grand Prix, Nalchik, 2009).
          • If 13...g5 14.Bh5 then:
            • 14...c6 15.Nb3 cxd5 16.exd5 a5 17.Nb5 a4 18.Na5 dxc5 19.d6 gives White the initiative (Bekiavsky-Romero, IT, Leon, 1994).
            • 14...Kh8 15.Re1 Ng8 16.h3 Nf6 17.Bf3 Re8 18.cxd6 cxd6 19.Ncb5 Re7 20.Rxc8 Rxc8 is equal (S. Ivanov-I. Smirin, Aeroflot Op, Moscow, 2003).
        • 13.h3 g5 14.a4 Ng6 15.a5 Re8 16.Nd2 f5 17.cxd6 cxd6 18.exf5 Bxf5 19.Nb5 Bb2 20.Rc4 is equal (Sosonko-van Wely, Dutch Ch, Hilversum, 1995).
      • If 10.Re1 f5 11.Ng5 Nf6 12.Bf3 c6 then:
        • 13.Be3 h6 14.Ne6 Bxe6 15.dxe6 fxe4 16.Nxe4 Nxe4 17.Bxe4 d5 18.cxd5 cxd5 19.Bc2 b6 20.Qg4 e4 21.Rad1 Qc7 22.Bb3 Rad8 draw (Nyback-Radjabov, Euro ChT, Plovdiv, 2003).
        • 13.Bb2 cxd5 14.cxd5 fxe4 15.Ngxe4 Nxe4 16.Nxe4 Nf5 17.Rc1 Bd7 18.Qb3 Bh6 19.Rc6 bxc6 20.dxc6+ Kh8 21.cxd7 Qxd7 22.Nf6 gives White compensation for the sacrificed exchange (Laznicka-G. Jones, Euro ChT, Crete, 2007).
      • If 10.g3 f5 11.Ng5 Nf6 12.f3 then:
        • 12...f4 13.b5 fxg3 14.hxg3 Nh5 15.Kf2 Nf4 16.gxf4 exf4 17.Qd3 gives White the advantage in space (van Wely-Dyachkov, Russian ChT, Sochi, 2008).
        • If 12...c6 13.b5 h6 14.Ne6 Bxe6 15.dxe6 then:
          • If 15...Ne8 16.bxc6 bxc6 17.Ba3 c5 18.Qa4 Nc7 19.Qd7 Qxd7 20.exd7 Nc6 21.Bd1 f4 22.Ba4 Nd4 23.Kg2 Bf6 24.Bc1 gives White the advantage in space and an advanced passer under protection (van Wely-Lenz, Op, Munich, 1992).
          • 15...c5 16.Nd5 Ne8 17.exf5 gxf5 18.Rb1 Nc7 19.Nxc7 Qxc7 20.g4 Rf6 21.gxf5 Nxf5 Black must win the e-pawn (W. Schmidt-Antoniewski, Polish ChT, Suwalki, 1999).
    • If 9...a5 10.Ba3 then:
      • If 10...axb4 11.Bxb4 Nd7 12.a4 Bh6 13.a5 f5 14.Nd2 then:
        • If 14...Nf6 15.c5 Bxd2 16.Qxd2 then:
          • 16...fxe4 17.cxd6 cxd6 18.Nb5 Nf5 19.Rac1 Rf7 20.g4 Nd4 21.Nxd4 exd4 22.Qxd4 Bxg4 23.Bxg4 Nxg4 24.Qxe4 Nxf2 25.Qe3 is equal (Kobalia-Ulko, Aeroflot Open, Moscow, 2002).
          • 16...Nxe4 17.Nxe4 fxe4 18.Bc3 Nf5 19.Ra4 e3 20.fxe3 Bd7 21.Raa1 Qg5 22.e4 Qxd2 23.Bxd2 Nd4 24.Bc4 gives White a small advantage in space (Savina-Bodnaruk, Russian ChU20W, St. Petersburg, 2008).
        • 14...Kh8 15.Bd3 Ng8 16.Qc2 Rf7 17.Na4 fxe4 18.Nxe4 Ndf6 19.Nac3 Bf5 20.Ng3 Bxd3 21.Qxd3 Qf8 22.Rab1 Qc8 23.Rb3 Qg4 24.f3 Qd4+ 25.Qxd4 exd4 26.Nd1 Bg7 27.Bd2 gives White the advantage in space (Pelletier-Renet, EU ChT, Pula, 1997).
      • 10...b6 11.bxa5 Nh5 12.Re1 f5 13.Bb4 bxa5 14.Ba3 Nf4 15.Bf1 fxe4 16.Nd2 Nd3 17.Bxd3 exd3 18.Nde4 Nf5 19.Qxd3 Nd4 20.Nb5 Rb8 21.Bc1 Bf5 22.a4 is equal (Borsuk-Schoene, OlW, Dresden, 2008).
    • If 9...Ne8 10.c5 f5 11.Nd2 Nf6 12.f3 f4 13.Nc4 g5 then:
      • 14.a4 Ng6 15.Ba3 Rf7 16.b5 Bf8 17.b6 dxc5 18.bxc7 Rxc7 19.Nb5 Rg7 20.d6 Be6 21.Bb2 Ne8 22.Nxe5 a6 23.d7 Nf6 24.Nxg6 hxg6 is equal (Rasmussen-P. H. Nielsen, Politiken Cup, Helsignor, 2007).
      • If 14.Ba3 Ng6 15.b5 then:
        • If 15...Ne8 16.b6 axb6 17.cxb6 cxb6 18.Qb3 h5 19.Rab1 g4 20.Nxb6 Qh4 21.Nxc8 Rxc8 22.Rfc1 Qg5 23.Nb5 Rd8 24.Nc7 gives White the advantage in space (Shirov-Akopian, Soviet Ch -final, Daugavpils, 1989).
        • 15...dxc5 16.Bxc5 Rf7 17.a4 h5 18.a5 g4 19.b6 g3 20.Kh1 Bf8 21.Bg1 Nh4 22.Re1 Nxg2 23.Kxg2 Rg7 24.Nxe5 gxh2+ 25.Kh1 Nxe4 White resigns (Roussel Roozman-Charbonneau, IT, Montreal, 2008).
  • If 9.Nd2 then:
    • If 9...a5 10.a3 then:
      • If 10...Nd7 11.Rb1 f5 12.b4 Kh8 13.f3 Ng8 14.Qc2 Ngf6 15.Bd3 f4 16.Nb5 b6 17.Bb2 then:
        • 17...Ne8 18.Be2 h5 19.c5 bxc5 20.bxc5 Nxc5 21.a4 Rf7 22.Rfc1 g5 23.Ba3 Bf8 24.Bxc5 dxc5 25.Nb3 g4 26.Nxc5 gives White the advantage in space (Gurevich-van Wely, Op, Wijk aan Zee, 1993).
        • If 17...g5 18.Be2 h5 19.c5 bxc5 20.bxc5 Nxc5 21.Bxe5 then:
          • 21...g4 22.fxg4 Nxg4 23.Bxg7+ Kxg7 24.Nb3 Na6 25.Qc3+ gives Black a strong game on the queenside (Gurevich-Khalifman, IT, Munich, 1992).
          • 21...dxe5?! 22.Qxc5 Ne8 23.Rfc1 Rf6 24.Qc3 White must win a pawn.
      • If 10...Bd7 11.b3 c6 12.Bb2 then:
        • 12...Bh6 13.c5 dxc5 14.Nc4 cxd5 15.exd5 Nf5 16.Nxe5 Nd4 17.Bc4 Bf5 is equal (Sherbakov-Korotylev, Op, Pardubice, 1996).
        • If 12...c5 13.Nb5 Ne8 14.b4 axb4 15.axb4 Rxa1 16.Qxa1 Bh6 17.Nxd6 Nxd6 18.bxc5 Bxd2 19.cxd6 Nc8 20.c5 f6 21.Rb1 b6 22.c6 Nxd6 23.cxd7 Qxd7 24.Bd3 Rc8 25.Rd1 gives White a more active game (Hefka-Kazoks, Corres, 1999).
    • 9...c5 10.Rb1 Ne8 11.b4 b6 12.bxc5 bxc5 13.Nb3 f5 14.Bg5 h6 15.Bxe7 Qxe7 16.Na5 Nf6 17.Nc6 Qe8 18.Bd3 Rf7 19.Rb3 f4 20.Be2 Bf8 21.Qc2 Bd7 22.Rfb1 is equal (Gurevich-Hebden, IT, Clichy, 2001).

9...Nd7 10.Nd3

  • If 10.Be3 f5 11.f3 f4 12.Bf2 g5 13.a4 Ng6 14.a5 then:
    • 14...h5 15.Nb5 Nf6 16.Nxa7 Bd7 17.c5 g4 18.c6 g3 19.hxg3 fxg3 20.Bxg3 Rxa7 21.cxd7 h4 22.Bf2 Ra8 23.Nc2 Bh6 24.Ne3 Bf4 25.Nf5 Nh5 26.Bb5 gives White two extra pawns and more space (Korchnoi-Xie Jun, TMatch, Prague, 1995).
    • 14...Rf7 15.c5 Nxc5 16.Bxc5 dxc5 17.Bc4 Kh8 18.a6 Rf6 19.axb7 Bxb7 20.Nd3 Bf8 21.Rf2 Bd6 22.Na4 Qe7 23.Rc2 Rg8 24.Nf2 h5 25.Be2 Bc8 26.h3 gives White more freedom (Vigorito-Fedorowicz, US Ch, San Diego, 2006).

10...f5 11.Bd2 Nf6 12.f3 f4 13.c5 g5 14.cxd6

  • I14.Rc1 Ng6 15.cxd6 cxd6 16.Nb5 Rf7 17.Qc2 Ne8 18.a4 h5 19.Nf2 Bf8 20.h3 Rg7 21.Qb3 Nh4 22.Rc2 g4 23.fxg4 Nf6 24.Be1 hxg4 25.hxg4 gives White an extra pawn (Ivanchuk-Cheparinov, IT, Sofia, 2008).

14...cxd6 15.Nf2 Ng6

  • If 15...h5 16.h3 Ng6 17.Qc2 Rf7 18.Rfc1 then:
    • If 18...g4 19.fxg4 hxg4 20.hxg4 Ne8 21.a4 Bf6 then:
      • 22.Ncd1 Bh4 23.Nh3 Rg7 24.Ndf2 Nf8 25.Ra3 Nh7 26.Rc3 Bd7 27.Bb5 gives White the advantage in space (Sosonko-Ye Jiangchuan, IT, Hong Kong, 1989).
      • 22.Bf3 Bh4 23.Ncd1 Bg3 24.Nh3 Qh4 25.Ndf2 Nf6 26.Qd1 gives White an extra pawn (Valden-Tsanas, Op, Glyfada, 2001).
    • 18...a6 19.a4 Bf8 20.a5 g4 21.fxg4 hxg4 22.hxg4 b5 23.axb6 Qxb6 24.Na4 Qa7 25.Ba5 Rb8 26.Bc7 Rb7 27.Bxd6 Bxd6 28.Qxc8+ gives White two extra pawns (Sosonko-Rogic, Op, Bled, 1997).

16.Qc2

  • If 16.Rc1 then:
    • If 16...Rf7 17.a4 h5 18.h3 Bf8 19.Nb5 Rg7 20.Rc3 Nh4 21.Be1 a6 22.Na3 Bd7 23.a5 Rc8 24.Nc4 Bb5 25.Nb6 Rxc3 26.Bxc3 then:
      • 26...Qe8 27.Nc4 Qg6 28.Qd3 Be7 29.Bb4 gives White the advantage in space (Ziltsman-Evans, Op, Greenville, 1980).
      • 26...Be8 27.Qc2 g4 28.hxg4 hxg4 29.fxg4 gives White a healthy advantage in space (Litinskaya-Chiburdanidze, ITZW, Tbilisi, 1976).
    • 16...h5 17.Nb5 Ne8 18.Qc2 g4 19.fxg4 hxg4 20.Qb3 gives White a small advantage in space and command of the c-file (Hutchings-Piket, Ol, Novi Sad, 1990).

16...Rf7 17.Rfc1 Ne8

  • I17...Bf8 18.a4 h5 19.Nb5 Ne8 20.h3 Nh4 21.Ra3 a6 22.Rc3 Bd7 23.Na3 gives White more freedom (Kozul-Srebrnic, Op, Nova Gorica, 1999).

18.a4 h5 19.Ncd1!?

  • 19.h3 Nh4 then:
    • 20.Qd1 Bf8 21.Ra3 Rg7 22.Be1 Nf6 23.Nb1 Ng6 24.Rac3 gives White command of the open file (Sosonko-Pflichthofer, Op, San Bernardino, 1991).
    • 20.Ra3 g4 21.fxg4 f3 22.gxf3 Nxf3+ 23.Bxf3 Rxf3 24.g5 Bxh3 25.Nxh3 Rxh3 givesWhite a small edge in space (Hvenekilde-Mikkelsen, Op, Helsingr, 2009).

19...Bf8

  • White has command of the open file and should be able to hold it; in addition, White's minor pieces have better potential.

20.Ra3 a6 21.Qc3 Bd7!?

  • Black misses an opportunity to counterattack.
  • 21...Rc7! 22.Qb4 Rxc1 23.Bxc1 a5 24.Qd2 Bg7 25.Rb3 White continues to enjoy the advantage in space, but he no longer has command of the c-file and his minor pieces don't look as bright as they did earlier.

22.Qa5

  • White plans to make the queenside his own.
  • Even better is 22.a5! Rc8 23.Qb4 Rxc1 24.Bxc1 Nf6 25.Rc3, giving White dominance over the Queen's wing.

22...b6!?

  • Black's reply is timid and allows White to contiue to carry out his queenside plans.
  • 22...Qxa5 23.Bxa5 Bg7 24.Bc3 Rc8 25.a5 Rc7 26.Rb3 keeps Black's problems on the queenside managable.

BLACK: Hikaru Nakamura
!""""""""#
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WHITE: Levon Aronian
Position after 22...b7b6


23.Qb4!

  • White begins putting pressure on the b-file.

23...Rg7 24.Rac3!?

  • White fails to follow through with the logical rejoinder to his last move.
  • 24.Rb3! then:
    • 24...Nc7 25.Qxb6 Bxa4 26.Ra3 Rb8 27.Qa5 Be8 28.Bxa6 White is a pawn to the good.
    • 24...a5 25.Qxb6 Qxb6 26.Rxb6 Bxa4 27.Ra1 Bc2 28.Bxa5 White is a pawn up.

24...Nh4

  • The text is better for Black than 24...Rf7 25.Rb3 when:
    • 25...a5 26.Qxb6 Qxb6 27.Rxb6 Bxa4 28.Ra1 gives White the initiative to make life miserable for anything that's Black on the queenside.
    • 25...Nc7 26.Qxb6 Bxa4 27.Ra3 Rb8 28.Qa5 leaves White on the virge of winning.
  • If 24...Ne7 25.Nd3 then:
    • 25...Rf7 26.Be1 b5 27.a5 Rc8 28.Bf2 leaves Black with ready access to Black's queenside.
    • 25...g4 26.Be1 Rb8 27.b3 a5 28.Qa3 Black cannot challenge White's command of the c-file.
    • 25...b5 26.a5 Rc8 27.Be1 Rg6 28.Bf2 leaves White dominating the queeside and should be able to place pieces in Black's territory.

25.h3 Be7!?

  • Black stumbles around, looking for the best way to get back in the game.
  • 25...Nf6! 26.Rc7 b5 27.axb5 axb5 28.Qb3 then:
    • 28...Be7 then White is still better after 29.Kh1 g4 30.fxg4 hxg4 31.hxg4 Ne8 32.R7c2 but his kingside is seriously weakened.
    • 28...Be8 29.R7c2 Qb6 30.Kh2 Rga7 31.Be1 leaves White better, but Black is building counterplay on the queenside.

26.Be1 Qb8 27.Kf1!?

  • White stumbles and opens the door a crack for Black to conjur complications.
  • 27.b3! Qd8 28.Nb2 a5 29.Qa3 Bf6 30.R3c2 Rg6 31.b4 maintains an impressive advantage for White.

27...Bd8!?

  • The text temporarily leaves Black's pawn at d6, the base of his pawn chain, without all the protection it should have.
  • 27...Qd8 28.Qb3 Bf6 29.R3c2 b5 30.axb5 axb5 31.Nc3 brings White's queenside attack closer to an end.

28.Rb3

  • 28.R3c2 Nf6 29.Nd3 Ng6 30.N1f2 a5 31.Qa3 leaves White better, but the game may now prove difficult to win.

BLACK: Hikaru Nakamura
!""""""""#
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WHITE: Levon Aronian
Position after 28.Rc3b3


28...Bc7!

  • The text move blocks White's access to the back rank and protects the weakest link in Black's pawn chain. Black hasn't leveled the game, but he's definitely back in it.
  • If 28...Nf6!? 29.a5! then:
    • 29...Bb5 30.Bxb5 bxa5 31.Qa4! axb5 32.Rxb5 aloows White to continue his initiative on the queenside.
    • If 29...g4? 30.fxg4 hxg4 31.Nxg4 Nxg4 then:
      • If 32.hxg4! Bxg4 33.Bxg4 Rxg4 then:
        • If 34.axb6! then:
          • 34...a5 35.Qa4 Qb7 36.Qc6 Qa6+ 37.Rc4 White wins.
          • If 34...Qb7 then after 35.Bxh4 Rxh4 36.Qxd6 White wins.
        • Also good is 34.Rc6! b5 35.g3 Ng6 36.Qxd6 Qxd6 37.Rxd6 when White is up by a pawn.
      • Not as good is 32.Bxg4!? then after 32...Bxg4! 33.hxg4 Rxg4 34.Bxh4 Rxh4 35.Nf2! White still has a strong advantage, but he hasn't won yet.

29.Qa3 Qd8 30.Rbc3 Bb8!?

  • Black places the Bishop in the way of the Rook's migration to other files.
  • Better is 30...b5! when:
    • 31.Rxc7! Nxc7 32.Qxd6 Ne8 33.Qxe5 bxa4 34.Qd4 White holds on to the advantage with a central passer duo.
    • 31.axb5? axb5! 32.Qb3 Ba5! gives Black a sudden and vicious counterattack.

31.b4 Ra7 32.Rc6

  • If 32.Nb2 b5 33.Kg1 then:
    • 33...Rc7 34.axb5 axb5 35.Nbd3 Rxc3 36.Bxc3 Nf6 37.Kf1 White cannot prevent Black from playing 37...g4! with effect.
    • 33...bxa4 34.Nxa4 Ra8 35.Nb2 Ba7 36.Kh1 g4! breaks up White's kingside, leaving the King exposed.

32...b5?!

  • Black fought back well, but now his hard work goes for naught.
  • Essential is 32...Bxc6! 33.dxc6 Kh7 34.Nc3 Nf6 35.b5 axb5, leveling the game

33.axb5 axb5 34.Ra6 Rb7

  • 34...Bc8!? 35.Ra5! Rgb7 36.Bxb5 Rxb5 37.Rxa7 Bxa7 38.Qxa7 gives White an extra pawn and an aggressive position.

BLACK: Hikaru Nakamura
!""""""""#
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WHITE: Levon Aronian
Position after 34...Ra7b7


35.Rcc6?!

  • The exchange sacrifice proves to be unsound.
  • 35.Ra1 Qf6 36.Qd3 Bc7 37.Bc3 Bb6 38.Ra8 breaks through to the back rank, giving White a huge advantage.

35...Bxc6!

  • White's advantage is a small one space.

36.dxc6 Ra7?!

  • It is tempting for Black to seek exchanges now that he has a material advantage. On the other hand, since White gained an advanced passer from the sacrifice, Black should keep his pieces on the board to defend against the c-pawn or seek counterplay.
  • 36...Rbf7 37.Bxb5 Nc7 38.Ra5 d5 39.Bd3 dxe4 40.Nxe4 blocks the c-pawn, keeps White's advantage to a small one in space and White still only has a pawn for the exchange.

37.Nc3 d5 38.Nxd5!

  • 38.Rxa7 Rxa7 39.Qb3 Ra1 40.Nxd5 White's passed c-pawn trumps Black's material edge.

38...Nf5 39.exf5

  • 39.Bxb5 Rxa6 40.Bxa6 Nc7 41.Qa5 leaves White with strong and mobile queenside passers.

39...Qxd5 40.Ne4 Rgc7

  • 40...Rgf7? 41.Nxg5 Rxa6 42.Qxa6 Nc7 43.Qb7 Rf8 44.Ne6 wins for White.

41.Nxg5?!

  • Black has a strong position, but jeopardizes everything.
  • If 41.Qa5! Kh8 42.Nc3 Qg8 43.Nxb5 then:
    • 43...Rxa6 44.Qxa6 Re7 45.f6 Rh7 46.f7 Rxf7 47.Bc4 wins the exchange
    • 43...Qf7 44.Nxc7 Qxc7 45.Qxc7 Rxc7 46.b5 wins for White.

41...Ng7?

  • This may have been Black's intended move when he played 40.Rgc7. However, he has a better move and, now that he has reached the time check, has no reason to not to take more time. Unfortunately, Nakamura can get into a bad habit of playing chess the way Jack Kerouac wrote novels.
  • 41...Rxa6! 42.Qxa6 Nd6 43.Ne4 Qxc6 44.Qxc6 Rxc6 is equal.

BLACK: Hikaru Nakamura
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WHITE: Levon Aronian
Position after 41...Ne8g7


42.Rb6!!

  • White threatens mate on the back rank. The Queen cannot be taken.

42...Nxf5 43.Rxb8+ Kg7 44.Qb2

  • White pins Black's weak e-pawn to its place.

44...Ra2 45.Qb1 Rc2 46.Rxb5

  • 46.Qxc2?? loses immediately to 46...Ne3+!.

46...Qd6 47.Rb7 Kh6 48.Kg1 Qxc6

  • 48...Rxe2 49.Qxf5 Rxe1+ 50.Kh2 Qg6 51.Qxg6+ Kxg6 52.Rxc7 wins for White.

49.Nf7+ Rxf7 50.Rxf7 Ne3 51.Ra7 Qd5

  • If 51...Qd6 then 52.Ra6 Rc6 53.b5 Rxa6 54.bxa6 Qd4 55.Bf2 wins easily.

52.Qa1 Nxg2 53.Qa6+ 1-0

  • 53...Kg5 54.Rg7+ Kf5 55.Qg6#.
  • 53...Rc6 54.Qb7 Rg6 55.Qh7+ Kg5 56.Rg7 Rxg7 57.Qxg7+ the King must move and then 58.Kxg2 leaves White two pieces up.
  • Mr. Nakamura resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 07:48 PM
Response to Reply #2
9. Ezat - Mamedyarov, Round 5
Shakh Mamedyarov played in all nine rounds. He won 7 and drew 2.



Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
Photo: ChessBase.com


Mohamed Ezat (Egypt) - Shakhriyar Manedyarov (Azerbaijan)
World Team Championship, Round 5/Board 3
Bursa, 9 January 2010

Slav Queen's Gambit: Marshall Opening


1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4

  • This pawn sacrifice was analyzed and used by Frank Marshall.

4...Bb4

  • If Black accepts the gambit with 4...dxe4 then if now 5.Nxe4 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Qxd4 7.Bxb4 Qxe4+ 8.Be2 Na6 then:
    • If 9.Ba5 then:
      • 9...f6 10.Qd8+ Kf7 11.0-0-0 e5 12.Bd3 Qf4+ 13.Kb1 Nc5 14.Ne2 Qg4 15.h3 is equal (Yermilinsky-Kaidanov, US Ch, Stillwater, 2007).
      • 9...b6 10.Qd6 Bd7 11.Bc3 f6 12.Nf3 Ne7 13.0-0-0 Qxe2 14.Qxd7+ Kf7 15.Qd4 Rhd8 16.Qg4 Kf8 17.Rde1 Qd3 18.Nd4 Rxd4 19.Qxd4 Nb4 20.Qxd3 Nxd3+ 21.Kc2 Nxe1+ 22.Rxe1 e5 gives Black an extra pawn (Volkov-Frolyanov, Aeroflot Op, Moscow, 2008).
    • If 9.Bd6 then:
      • 9...Qxg2 10.Qd2 Nf6 11.Bf3 Qg6 12.Ne2 e5 13.0-0-0 Bg4 14.Rhg1 0-0-0 15.Qe3 h5 16.h3 Rxd6 17.Rxd6 Nb4 18.Qb3 Qh6+ 19.Kd1 Bxf3 20.Qxf3 Qh7 21.Nc3 Qc2+ 22.Ke1 is equal (van Wely-Pavasovic, Euro Ch, Dresden, 2007).
      • 9...e5 10.Nf3 Bg4 11.0-0 0-0-0 12.Bd3 Qf4 13.Bxe5 Qxe5 14.Nxe5 Bxd1 15.Bf5+ Kc7 16.Nxf7 Nh6 17.Nxh6 Bh5 18.Bg4 Bxg4 19.Nxg4 Rd2 20.b3 gives White an extra pawn (Bacrot-Tregubov, KO, Corsica, 2005).
    • 9.Bc3 Ne7 10.Nf3 0-0 11.0-0 f6 12.Re1 e5 13.Bd3 Qg4 14.Re4 Qe6 15.b4 Qf7 16.Nh4 g5 17.Nf3 Bf5 18.Re3 Rad8 19.Qe2 Bxd3 20.Rxd3 Qxc4 21.Nxe5 Qe6 22.Rxd8 Rxd8 23.Qg4 Qxg4 24.Nxg4 Nd5 25.Nxf6+ Nxf6 26.Bxf6 is equal (Marshall-Schrader, US Ch, St. Louis, 1904).

5.Bd2!?

  • If 5.cxd5 exd5 6.e5 Ne7 7.Nf3 then:
    • If 7...c5 8.a3 Bxc3+ 9.bxc3 Nbc6 10.Be2 0-0 11.0-0 Bg4 12.Rb1 then:
      • 12...b6 13.dxc5 bxc5 14.Rb5 is equal (Krush-Izoria, Foxwoods Op, Mashantucket, 2007).
      • 12...Qc7 13.h3 Bh5 14.a4 Bg6 15.Bd3 is equal (Khalifman-Galkin, IT, Hoogeveen, 2007).
    • 7...0-0 8.Be2 Ng6 9.0-0 Na6 10.a3 Be7 11.Be3 gives White a very slight edge in space (Lautier-Zhukova, Geller Mem Rpd, Odessa, 2006).
  • If 5.exd5 exd5 6.cxd5 cxd5 then:
    • 7.Bd3 Nc6 8.Nge2 Bg4 9.0-0 Nge7 10.Qb3 Qd7 11.Nf4 Rd8 12.Na4 0-0 13.Nc5 Bxc5 14.dxc5 Rfe8 15.Bd2 Ng6 16.Rfe1 is equal (Kouatly-Bacrot, French Ch, Meribel, 1998).
    • 7.Bb5+ Bd7 8.Bd3 Ne7 9.Qf3 Qc8 10.Nge2 Bf5 11.0-0 Bxd3 12.Qxd3 0-0 is equal (Pashikian-Bacrot, Aeroflot Op, Moscow, 2009).

5...dxc4 6.Bxc4 Qxd4 7.Qe2 e5!?

  • 7...Nf6 8.Nf3 Qd8 9.0-0 Nbd7 10.a3 Be7 11.Rac1 0-0 12.e5 Nd5 gives Black an extra pawn (San Segundo-Shirov, IT, Madrid, 1996).

  • 7...b5 8.Bb3 Nf6 9.Nf3 Qb6 10.0-0 Nbd7 11.Rfe1 Bxc3 12.Bxc3 b4 is equal (Najer-Tomofeev, Russian Ch, Krasnoyarsk, 2003).

8.0-0-0

  • Black has a more aggressive position and an extra pawn.
  • 8.a3 Be7 9.Rd1 Qd6 10.Qh5 Qg6 11.Qxg6 hxg6 gives Black a more active game.

8...Qc5 9.Kb1 Nf6 10.a3 Bxc3 11.Bxc3 a5

  • In spite of his extra pawn, Black must play carefully else White finds compensation for the material deficit.
  • If 11...Bg4!? 12.f3! Bh5 then:
    • 13.g4 b5 14.Bb3 Bg6 15.Qd3 Nfd7 is unclear: Black has an extra pawn, but White has more space.
    • 13.Nh3 Bg6 14.Bb4 Qb6 15.Bd6 is also unclear for the same reason.

12.Nf3 b5

  • 12...Nbd7 13.Rc1 Qe7 14.a4 0-0 15.Rhe1 b6 Black still has an extra pawn and White has no compensation for it.

13.Ba2 Bg4!?

  • 13...Ng4 then after 14.Ng5 Nh6 15.Qd2 Nd7 space is about equal, but Black still has an extra pawn.

14.Rc1?!

  • White misses the opportunity for a fine game and digs himself a deep hole.
  • If 14.Bxe5! Nbd7 15.Bd6 Qh5 16.e5 then:
    • 16...Qf5+ 17.Qc2 Ne4 18.e6 fxe6 19.Rhe1 Nec5 is equal; White has enough extra space to compensate for the pawn.
    • 16...Ne4!? 17.e6! fxe6 18.Bxe6 Bxe6 19.Qxe4 White has regained the pawn with an advantage in space.

BLACK: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
!""""""""#
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WHITE: Mohamed Ezat
Position after 14.Rd1c1


14...Qe7!

  • Black takes aim at White's weak queenside.

15.Qe1

  • If 15.Bd2 then after 15...0-0 16.Rhd1 Rd8 17.h3 Bxf3 18.Qxf3 b4 White's queenside crumbles.

15...Nbd7!

  • The text is stronger than 15...b4?! 16.axb4 axb4 17.Bxb4 Qa7 18.Ba3! when White can hold on by defending his King position with pieces.

16.Bxa5 c5 17.b4 c4!?

  • White has two Bishops, but that means nothing when one of them is totally immobile Nevertheless, Black should bring more piece power to the bear on the queenside.
  • If 17...Be6! 18.Bxe6 Qxe6 19.Ka1 Qc6 then:
    • 20.Nd2 0-0 21.f3 Qa6 22.Qe3 Ra7 23.Rhd1 Rc8 keeps the pressure on Whites Kingside.
    • 20.bxc5 Nxe4 21.Bb4 0-0 22.Qe3 Rfe8 23.Rhe1 Nef6 puts White's queenside under restraint.

18.a4!

  • White seizes the moment and moves to weaken Black's pawns.
  • If 18.Qe3? then Black dismantles White's queenside after 18...0-0 19.Rhd1 Rfc8! 20.Rd2 Bxf3 21.gxf3 Nc5!.

18...bxa4

  • The text move weakens Black's pawns, but what else is there?
  • If 18...Bxf3 19.gxf3 bxa4 20.Rxc4 0-0 then:
    • 21.Qe3 Rfc8 22.Rhc1 Rxc4 23.Rxc4 Ne8 leaves White still standing and Black queenside initiative spent. Black, howere, still stands better with a safer King position.
    • 21.Kc2 Nh5 22.Qd2 Qe6 23.Kd1 Nb6 leaves White with possibilities of counterplay.

19.Nd2!

  • White attacks White's newly weakened pawns.

19...Nc5

  • Black gives back his extra pawn in an effort to preserve his queenside initiative.
  • If 19...0-0 then:
    • If 20.Qe3 Rfb8 21.Ka1 Nh5 then:
      • 22.Nxc4! then after 22...Nf4 23.Rc2 Bh5 24.Rd2 Nf6 25.g3 Nh3 White has successfully refuffed Black's queenside attack.
      • 22.Bxc4? then after 22...Be6 23.Bxe6 Qxe6 24.Qh3 Qd6 25.Bc7 Qd4+! wins at least a pawn.
    • 20.Ka1 Rfb8 21.Nxc4 Ra6 22.Rc3 Rc6 23.f3 Be6 Black's attack continues.

20.Nxc4 Nb3

  • If 20...Nd3?! then 21.Qd2 Nxc1 22.Nd6+ Kf8 23.Rxc1 Be6 puts an end to Black's initiative.

21.Bxb3 axb3

  • Black has a passed pawn, albeit weak, and White's Bishop must move with caution.

22.Qc3 0-0 23.Qxe5!?

  • White was almost back in the game.
  • 23.f3 Be6 24.Nxe5 Rfc8 25.Nc6 Qb7 is equal.

23...Qd7 24.Nb2?

  • After tetering for several moves, White collapses.
  • 24.f3 Be6 25.Rhd1 Qa4 26.Qa1 Qb5 27.Nd6 Qh5 assures that White will be able to put up resistance on the queenside.

BLACK: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
!""""""""#
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WHITE: Mohamed Ezat
Position after 24.Nc4b2


24...Nxe4!!

  • Of course, everyone knows that Black didn't just invite a fork trick.

25.f3

  • The text assures that matters will now end quickly.
  • White could mount a more stubborn defense after 25.Rc7 Nd2+ 26.Ka1 Qd8 27.Qf4 Qd5 28.Rhc1 Be6.

  • If 25.Qxe4?? then 25...Bf5! wins immediately.

25...Rfe8!

  • The text is even better than 25...Nf2 26.fxg4 Nxh1 27.Qe2 Rfe8 28.Qf3 Qd2.

26.Qc7

  • If 26.Qf4 then Black wins easily after 26...Bf5 27.Ka1 Qe7 28.Nc4 Qf6+.

26...Qd4!

  • The sacrifice of the Knight bring the game to a climax.

27.fxe4 Qxe4+ 28.Ka1 Qxb4 29.Rc5 Qa3+!

  • Black forces mate.

30.Kb1 Qa2+ 31.Kc1 Qa1+ 32.Kd2 Qxb2+ 0-1

  • 33.Rc2 Rad8+ 34.Qxd8 Qxc2#.
  • Ezat Sahib resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-17-10 04:16 PM
Response to Reply #1
5. Bonus Game: Larsen - Petrosian, IT, Santa Monica, 1966
Danish grandmaster Bent Larsen was Bobby Fischer's strongest rival for the unofficial title of best chess player outside the Soviet Union from 1959 until 1971.



Bent Larsen
Wikipedia (Creative Commons Copyright, Attribution/Share Alike>


Bent Larsen - Tigran Petrosian
Second Piagorsky Cup, Round 7
Santa Monica, July 1966

Open Sicilian Game: Accelerated Dragon Defense (Maroczy Opening)


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 g6 5.Be3

  • If 5.Nc3 Bg7 then:
    • If 6.Nb3 Nf6 7.Be2 d6 8.0-0 0-0 9.Re1 then:
      • If 9...Be6 then:
        • If 10.Bg5 then:
          • If 10...a5 then:
            • If 11.a3 a4 12.Nd2 Ra5 13.Be3 d5 14.exd5 Nxd5 15.Nxd5 Rxd5 16.c3 Ne5 17.Bd4 Rxd4!? 18.cxd4 Qxd4 is unclear: Black has only a pawn for the exchange, but her pieces are more active (Vachier Lagrave-Dzagnidze, Op, Gibraltar, 2009).
            • 11.Bb5 Ne5 12.h3 Rc8 13.Nd5 Bxd5 14.exd5 a4 15.Bxa4 Nc4 16.Rb1 Qb6 17.Nd2 Nxb2 18.Qf3 gives White the advantage in space and greater activity (Geller-Knoppert, IT, Berlin, 1991).
          • If 10...Rc8 11.Bf1 Ne5 12.Nd5 then:
            • If 12...Bxd5 13.exd5 Qd7 then:
              • If 14.c3 Nc4 15.Bxc4 Rxc4 16.Qf3 h6 17.Be3 Ra4 18.Bd4 Qb5 19.Red1 Rc8 20.Bxf6 exf6 21.Qe3 is equal (Trygstad-Dannevig, Norwegian Ch, Kristiansund, 2001).
              • 14.h3 h6 15.Be3 a6 16.a4 Qc7 17.Re2 Rfe8 18.a5 Nfd7 19.Bd4 e6 20.dxe6 Rxe6 is equal (Moreno-Daskevics, World Youth, Oropesa del Mar, 2001).
            • If 12...Nc4 then:
              • 13.Bxc4 Rxc4 14.Qd3 Bxd5 15.exd5 Qc8 16.c3 Re8 17.Re2 Ra4 18.h3 Qc4 19.Qxc4 Rxc4 20.Rd1 Ra4 21.Nc1 Ne4 is equal (Arzumanian-Zubarev, Ukrainian ChT, Alushta, 2000).
              • 13.Nxf6+ exf6 14.Bc1 f5 15.exf5 Bxf5 16.Nd4 Bd7 17.c3 d5 18.Qf3 Bc6 19.b3 Ne5 20.Qg3 Re8 21.Bf4 gives White the advantage in space (Vombek-Jeric, Slovakian Ch, Grize, 2001).
        • If 10.Bf1 then:
          • 10...Re8 11.Nd5 Bxd5 12.exd5 Nb4 13.c4 Qd7 14.a3 Na6 15.Be3 Nc7 16.Rc1 e6 17.dxe6 Nxe6 18.Qf3 Qa4 19.Nd4 gives White more space and activity (Linares-Partac, OlW, Dresden, 2008).
          • 10...d5 11.Nc5 Bg4 12.f3 d4 13.Ne2 Bc8 14.Nb3 Qb6 15.Nf4 e5 16.Nd3 Ne8 17.c3 Nd6 18.cxd4 Nb5 19.Be3 Nbxd4 20.Nxd4 Nxd4 21.f4 exf4 22.Nxf4 Qd6 is equal (Lekic-Kovacevic, Yugoslav Ch -final, Kladovo, 1994).
      • If 9...a6 10.Bf1 b5 then:
        • If 11.Bg5 h6 12.Bh4 then:
          • 12...Nd7 13.Rb1 Nb6 14.Nd5 g5 15.Bg3 Nc4 16.c3 e6 17.Ne3 N4e5 18.f3 Bb7 19.Qd2 Qc7 20.Rbd1 Rad8 is equal (Schmaltz-Kotronias, Op, Athens, 2003).
          • 12...Bb7 13.a4 b4 14.Nd5 Nd7 15.Rb1 Nb6 16.Qd2 Nxa4 17.Nxb4 Nxb4 18.Qxb4 Bc6 19.e5 Qb8 20.Qa3 g5 21.Bg3 dxe5 22.Nd4 give White more space and freedom (Gelfand-Kramnik, IT, Novgorod, 1996).
        • 11.Nd5 Nd7 12.c3 e6 13.Ne3 Nb6 14.g3 Bb7 15.f4 Qc7 16.Bg2 Rad8 17.Nd4 Rfe8 18.h4 e5 19.Nxc6 Bxc6 20.Nd5 Bxd5 21.exd5 Nc4 gives Black the best minor piece on the board in the Knight (Lenic-Kovacevic, Op, Bled, 2002).
    • If 6.Be3 Nf6 7.Bc4 0-0 8.Bb3 then:
      • If 8...d6 then:
        • If 9.f3 Bd7 10.Qd2 then:
          • If 10...Nxd4 11.Bxd4 b5 12.h4 a5 then:
            • If 13.a4 bxa4 14.Nxa4 then:
              • 14...e5 15.Be3 Be6 16.Nb6 Rb8 17.Qxa5 Bxb3 18.cxb3 d5 19.Nxd5 Nxd5 20.Qxd5 Qxd5 21.exd5 Rxb3 22.Bc5 Rc8 23.Ba3 e4 24.0-0 draw (Liberzon-Adorjan, TMatch, Moscow, 1971).
              • If 14...Be6 15.Nb6 Ra6 16.Nd5 Bxd5 17.exd5 Qc7 18.Ra4 Rb8 19.Kf2 h5 20.Re1 Ne8 21.Bxg7 Nxg7 22.g4 Qd8 23.Kg2 Ra7 24.Qe3 Rab7 25.Re4 Rb4 is equal (Shirov-Topalov, FIDE Knock Out, Moscow, 2001).
            • 13.h5 a4 14.Bd5 e5 15.Be3 b4 16.Ne2 Nxd5 17.exd5 Rc8 18.c3 bxc3 19.Nxc3 a3 20.bxa3 e4 is equal (Gresser-Rubtsova, Interzonal W, Ohrid, 1971).
          • If 10...Rc8 11.0-0-0 Ne5 then:
            • 12.h4 h5 13.Bg5 Rc5 14.Kb1 b5 15.g4 a5 16.gxh5 a4 17.h6 Bh8 18.h7+ Nxh7 19.Bd5 b4 20.Nce2 Nxg5 21.hxg5 e6 22.Nf4 Bg7 23.Ndxe6 Bxe6 24.Nxe6 fxe6 25.Bxe6+ Nf7 26.Qh2 Re8 is equal (Amonotov-Le Quang Liem, Aeroflot Op, Moscow, 2008).
            • 12.Kb1 Nc4 13.Bxc4 Rxc4 14.g4 b5 15.b3 Rc8 16.Ndxb5 Qa5 17.a4 a6 18.Nd5 Qxd2 19.Nxe7+ Kh8 20.Rxd2 Rce8 21.Nxg6+ fxg6 22.Nxd6 Re6 23.Bc5 Bc6 24.Nc4 Rb8 25.Rd6 Rxd6 26.Bxd6 gives White four pawns for a minor piece (Bologan-Fedorov, IT, Calcutta, 1999).
        • 9.h3 Bd7 10.0-0 Qa5 11.f4 Nxd4 12.Bxd4 Bc6 13.Qd3 Rad8 14.Rad1 Nd7 15.Bxg7 Kxg7 16.Qd4+ Nf6 17.Kh2 e5 18.fxe5 Qxe5+ 19.Kg1 a6 20.Rd3 Rd7 21.Rfd1 Rfd8 22.a3 h5 23.R3d2 h4 24.Rd3 Re8 25.Bd5 Qxd4+ 26.Rxd4 Bxd5 27.exd5 g5 is equal (I. Smirin-Lutz, Zonal, Dresden, 1998).
      • If 8...a5 9.f3 d5 then:
        • If 10.Bxd5 Nxd5 then:
          • 11.Nxd5 f5 12.Nxc6 bxc6 13.Nb6 Rb8 14.Qxd8 Rxd8 15.Rd1 Rxd1+ 16.Kxd1 fxe4 17.Nxc8 Rxc8 18.b3 exf3 19.gxf3 a4 20.Ke2 Ra8 is equal (Landa-Kuzubov, Euro ChT, Rethymnon, 2003).
          • 11.exd5 Nb4 12.Nde2 Bf5 13.Rc1 b5 14.0-0 Rc8 15.Nd4 Bxd4 16.Qxd4 Nxc2 17.Rxc2 Bxc2 18.Bh6 e5 19.Qxe5 f6 20.Qe6+ Rf7 21.Ne4 Bxe4 22.fxe4 Qd7 23.Qxd7 Rxd7 24.Rxf6 Re8 25.Kf2 draw (DeFirmian-Pigusov, World Cup, Moscow, 1989).
        • 10.exd5 Nb4 11.Nde2 a4 12.Nxa4 Nfxd5 13.Bf2 Bf5 14.0-0 b5 15.Nac3 Nxc3 16.Nxc3 Qxd1 17.Rfxd1 Bxc2 18.Bxc2 Nxc2 19.Rac1 Bxc3 20.Rxc2 Bf6 draw (Shirov-Lautier,IT, Tilburg, 1997).

5...Bg7 6.c4

  • 6.Nc3 transposes to Liberzhon-Adorjan and related game in the notes to White's 5th move.

6...Nf6 7.Nc3 Ng4

  • If 7...0-0 8.Be2 then:
    • If 8...d6 9.0-0 Bd7 10.Qd2 Nxd4 11.Bxd4 Bc6 12.f3 a5 13.b3 Nd7 14.Be3 Nc5 then:
      • If 15.Rab1 Qb6 16.Rfc1 Rfc8 17.Rc2 Qd8 18.Bf1 h5 19.a3 Kh7 20.b4 axb4 21.axb4 Ne6 22.Nd5 Ra3 then:
        • If 23.Kh1 Rca8 24.f4 Ra1 then:
          • 25.Rbc1 Qh8 26.Bd3 Bxd5 27.exd5 Nd4 28.Bxd4 Bxd4 29.g3 is equal (Stubberud-E. Lie, Norwegian Ch, Moss, 2006).
          • 23.Bb6 Qf8 24.Bf2 Rca8 25.Nb6 Ra1 26.Rxa1 Rxa1 27.b5 Be8 28.Qd5 gives White the advantage in space (Johannessen-K. Lie, Norwegian Ch, Molde, 2004).
        • If 15.Rac1 Qb6 16.Nb5 Rfc8 17.Rfd1 Qd8 then:
          • 18.Bf1 Qf8 19.Nc3 b6 20.Nd5 Rab8 21.Rb1 Rb7 22.b4 axb4 23.Rxb4 Bxd5 24.cxd5 Ra8 25.Rdb1 Qd8 gives White the advantage in space (DeFirmian-M. Petursson, IT, Reggio Emilia, 1989-90).
          • 18.Nd4 Qf8 19.Rb1 Bf6 20.a3 Qg7 21.b4 gives White the advantage in space (Dr. Nunn-Velimirovic, Ol, Dubai, 1986).
      • If 8...b6 9.0-0 Bb7 10.f3 then:
        • If 10...e6 then:
          • If 11.Nxc6 Bxc6 12.Qd6 Ne8 13.Qd2 then:
            • 13...f5 14.exf5 gxf5 15.Rac1 Qh4 16.b4 Rf7 17.Bf4 Nf6 18.Bg5 Qh5 19.Nb5 gives White a slight advantage in space (W. Schmidt-Balcerowski, Polish ChT, Augustow, 1975).
            • 13...Qe7 14.Rfd1 f5 15.exf5 gxf5 16.Rac1 gives neither side a great advantage (W. Schmidt-Jacek, IT, Poznan, 1987).
          • 11.Qd2 d5 12.Nxc6 Bxc6 13.cxd5 exd5 14.e5 Ne8 15.f4 f6 16.Rad1 Nc7 17.Bd4 fxe5 18.Bxe5 Bxe5 19.fxe5 is equal (Saric-Predojevic, Op, Pula, 2005).
        • If 10...Rc8 11.Qd2 then:
          • 11...Nh5 12.Rfd1 Ne5 13.b3 f5 14.exf5 gxf5 15.Qc2 Qe8 16.Nxf5 Nxf3+ 17.Bxf3 Bxf3 18.Nxg7 Bxd1 19.Nxe8 Bxc2 20.Nc7 Rxc7 21.Nd5 Rb7 22.Nxe7+ Kf7 23.Nd5 White resigns(Kreiman-Taylor, World Op, Philadelphia, 1992).
          • 11...d6 12.Rac1 a6 13.Rfd1 Nd7 14.Nxc6 Bxc6 15.b4 Re8 16.Bf1 Bb7 is equal (Timoshchenko-Skembris, Op, Bozen, 1998).
  • 25.Rxa1 Rxa1 26.Rc1 Qa8 27.Bd3 Nd4 28.Rxa1 Qxa1+ 29.Qc1 Qa4 30.Nxe7 Qxb4 31.f5 gives White the more active game (Zawadzka-Sikorova, World ChTW, Ekaterinburg, 2007).

8.Qxg4 Nxd4 9.Qd1 Ne6

  • If 9...e5 10.Bd3 0-0 11.0-0 d6 then:
    • If 12.Qd2 Be6 then:
      • 13.Rac1 a6 14.b3 Rc8 15.f3 Qa5 16.Rfd1 f5 17.exf5 Nxf5 18.Be4 gives White a slight edge in space (Tal-Partos, Ol, Nice, 1974).
      • 13.Rad1 a6 14.b3 Qc7 15.Bxd4 exd4 16.Ne2 Bg4 17.f3 Bd7 18.Bb1 gives White more freedom (Leseige-Dzindzichashvili, Op, New York, 1993).
    • If 12.Rc1 Be6 13.b3 a6 14.Bb1 then:
      • 14...Rb8 15.Kh1 b5 16.cxb5 axb5 17.Qd3 b4 18.Nd5 Bxd5 19.exd5 Qa5 gives Black a small advantage in space (Smyslov-Botvinnik, Alekhine Mem, Moscow, 1956).
      • 14...b5 15.cxb5 Nxb5 16.Nxb5 axb5 17.Rc6 d5 18.exd5 draw (Gulko-Seirawan, US Ch, Key West, 1994).

10.Qd2 d6

  • If 10...Qa5 11.Rc1 b6 then:
    • 12.Be2 Bb7 13.f3 h5 14.0-0 g5 15.Rfd1 d6 16.Nd5 Qxd2 17.Rxd2 h4 18.b4 Be5 19.a4 f6 20.Ra2 Kf7 is equal (W. Schmidt-Kuczynski, Polish Ch, Slupsk, 1988).
    • 12.Bd3 Bb7 13.0-0 g5 14.Rfd1 d6 15.Nd5 Qxd2 16.Rxd2 Rc8 17.Rcd1 Bd4 18.Bxd4 Nxd4 is equal (Henriksson-Molander, Op, Molander, 2000).

11.Be2 Bd7 12.0-0

  • If 12.Rc1 Qa5 13.0-0 Bc6 14.f3 g5 then:
    • If 15.a3 Be5 16.b4 Qxa3 17.b5 Bd7 18.Nd5 Rg8 then:
      • 19.Rc2 Bf4 20.Nxf4 gxf4 21.Bf2 Nc5 is equal (Litinskaya-Sedina, Yugoslav ChT, Cetinje, 1992).
      • 19.Kh1 Rc8 20.g3 Bh8 draw (Coleman-Movsisyan, Op, Stillwater, 2006).
  • 15.b3 h5 16.Nd5 Qxd2 17.Bxd2 Bd4+ 18.Kh1 a5 19.Rfd1 Bc5 20.Bc3 is equal (Mohd OImar-van den Berg, IT, Vlissingen, 2007).

12...0-0 13.Rad1

  • If 13.Rac1 Bc6 then:
    • If 14.f3 a5 15.b3 Nc5 16.Rfd1 Qb6 then:
      • 17.Nd5 Bxd5 18.cxd5 Rfc8 19.Rc2 Qb4 20.Rdc1 Qxd2 21.Rxd2 gives White a more active game (Adam-Boehmer, Keres Mem, Vancouver, 2001).
      • 17.Rb1 Qb4 18.Nd5 Bxd5 19.exd5 Rfe8 20.Bf1 e6 21.dxe6 Rxe6 22.Bf2 Rae8 23.g3 Qxd2 24.Rxd2 gives White fewer pawn weaknesses and an attack on Black's weak d-pawn (Green-K. Lie, Op, Helsingr, 2007).
    • 14.Rfd1 Nc5 15.f3 a5 16.b3 Qb6 17.Nb5 Rac8 is equal (Keres-Petrosian, Candidates' Trmt, Bled, 1959).

13...Bc6 14.Nd5

  • 14.Bh6 a6 15.Bxg7 Kxg7 16.b4 b5 17.cxb5 axb5 18.Bxb5 Bxb5 19.Nxb5 gives White an extra pawn (Gligoric-Pomar, ZT, Madrid, 1960).

14...Re8!?

  • 14...Nc5 15.f3 a5 16.Bd4 Bxd4+ 17.Qxd4 e5 18.Qd2 gives White a small advantage in space (Porat-Larsen, ITZ, Amsterdam, 1964).

15.f4

  • White has an advantage in space.

15...Nc7

  • If 15...Nc5 16.e5 Na6 then:
    • After 17.Qe1 Bxd5 18.Rxd5 Qc8 19.Qg3 Nb4 20.Rb5 White continues to enjoy the advantage in space.
    • 17.Bd4!? dxe5! 18.Bxe5 f6 is again equal.

16.f5 Na6 17.Bg4

  • 17.b4 e6 18.f6 Bxd5 19.cxd5 Bxf6 20.Bb5 gives Black a more active game.

17...Nc5 18.fxg6 hxg6!?

  • In most situations, one wants to "capture toward the center." However, White has too many heavy pieces that can be used in a kingside attack, and Black will want to keep the h-file closed.
  • If 18...fxg6 19.Bxc5 dxc5 20.Qf2 then:
    • 20...Qd6 21.Nb6 Bd4 22.Rxd4 cxd4 23.Nxa8 Rxa8 24.Qf3 is equal.
    • 20...Qa5 21.a3 Kh8 22.b4 Qxa3 23.Qxc5 gives White the advantage in space.

19.Qf2!

  • This compels Black to bring his Rook back to f8.

19...Rf8 20.e5!?

  • White has the right idea, but goes about it the wrong way.
  • 20.Bxc5! dxc5 21.Qxc5 Bxd5 22.Rxd5 Qb6 23.Qf2 gives White an extra pawn.

20...Bxe5!

  • Black could have easily gone wrong here, too.
  • 20...Bxd5!? 21.Rxd5! f5 22.exf6 Rxf6 23.Bf3 Qb6 24.Qd2 gives White the advantage in space.

21.Qh4

  • The game is equal.
  • 21.Bxc5 dxc5 22.Qxc5 Bd6 23.Nf6+ Kh8 24.Qf2 Qb6 is equal.

21...Bxd5 22.Rxd5 Ne6 23.Rf3 Bf6?

  • Even the greatest defesive player of the twentieth century is entitled to miss an embryonic attack once in a while.
  • 23...f5 24.Rh3 Kf7 25.Qf2 Bf6 26.Be2 remains equal.

24.Qh6!

  • This is the best move. The exchange sacrifice at f6 clearly fails.

24...Bg7 25.Qxg6!

  • White finds the only winning continuation.
  • 25.Qh4!? f5! 26.Bh3 g5 27.Bxg5 Nxg5 28.Qxg5 e6 is equal.

25...Nf4

  • If 25...fxg6 26.Bxe6+! Rf7 27.Bxf7+ Kf8 28.Bxg6+ then:
    • 28...Bf6 29.Rh5! Qc7 30.Rxf6+ exf6 31.Rh8+ wins the Queen for White.
    • If 28...Kg8 29.Bf7+ Kf8 30.Be6+ Ke8 31.Rg3 then:
      • If 31...Qc8 then after 32.Bxc8 Rxc8 33.Rxg7 Rxc4 34.Bg5 White is up by two pieces.
      • If 31...Qb8 then after 32.Rxg7 White recovers the Queen.

BLACK: Tigran Petrosian
!""""""""#
$t+ W Tl+%
$Oo+ OoV %
$ + O +q+%
$+ +r+ + %
$ +p+ Mb+%
$+ + Br+ %
$pP + +pP%
$+ + + K %
/(((((((()

WHITE: Bent Larsen
Position after 25...Ne6f4


26.Rxf4!!

  • The Queen sacrifice opens all roads leading the the Black King.

26...fxg6 27.Be6+ Rf7

  • If 27...Kh7 28.Rh4+ Bh6 29.Bxh6 Rf5 30.Rxf5! then:
    • 30...gxf5 31.Bxf5+ Kg8 32.Be6+ Kh7 33.Bf7 Qb6+ 34.Kf1 Black must either submit to immediate mate or surrender his Queen.
    • If 30...g5 then after 31.Bxg5+ Kg7 32.Be3 Qe8 33.Bd4+ Kg6 34.Rhh5 White mates on the next move.

28.Rxf7 Kh8 29.Rg5 b5 30.Rg3 1-0

  • Black must lose his Queen or submit to mate.
  • Tigran Vartanovich resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jan-19-10 01:43 PM
Response to Original message
10. Update (Tuesday): Shirov on Fire at 1st rest day in Wijk aan Zee
Edited on Tue Jan-19-10 01:45 PM by Jack Rabbit


Spanish grandmaster Alexei Shirov is red hot in Group A as the first of three scheduled rest days comes to the 73nd Corus Tournament in the North Sea resort of Wijk aan Zee, Holland.



Alexei Shirov
Photo: ChessBase.de (Germany)

Shirov has won all four of his games. In three of those, he has won a 500 prize for best game of the round. Shirov is not only winning, he is winning in style.

World number one Magnus Carlsen, reigning US champion Hikaru Nakamura and Ukrainian GM Vassily Ivanchuk are tied for second with three points each.

In Group B, 15 year-old Dutch national champion Anish Giri and Chinese GM Ni Hua are tied for first with three points each. Another 15-year-old grandmaster, Ray Robson of the United States, is tied for first place with Li Chao of China in Group C with 3 point apiece.

After tomorrow's rest day, play resumes Thursday.
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