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Charlemagne Donating Member (94 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 06:39 PM
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Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, worth it?
I got Confessions of an Economic Hit Man in grad school. Because of the regular reading load I never got around to it. I have some free time now. Is the book a good read? Is it accurate or somewhat embellished? Thanks.
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OffWithTheirHeads Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 06:40 PM
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1. Only if you're not pissed off enough already.
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rainy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 06:41 PM
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2. absolutely worth it. Its a good read. nt
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mike_c Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 06:42 PM
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3. it's an excellent and illuminating book...
...not to mention short and to the point. Highly recommended.
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 06:56 PM
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4. Absolutely essential to understand what's been going on,
and probably accurate, as its autobiographical.
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prairierose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 07:36 PM
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5. I thought it was a good read and if you do not understand how ...
we got to where we are,it is an important piece of the puzzle
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barbtries Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 08:02 PM
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6. it's worth the read.
enlightening.
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applegrove Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 10:02 PM
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7. Never read it. And the guy admits to being a liar. So I doubt I'll read it.
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JackRiddler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 04:07 PM
Response to Reply #7
9. Until you source that claim with his actual admission, I'll reserve judgment on who here is the liar
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applegrove Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 09:02 PM
Response to Reply #9
10. The whole point of his book is that state department and USDA employees go around the world
and fool countries into getting loans. So he admits to fooling people. I studied development economics in University. For sure some of the aid was tied (in that US construction or engineering or managerial firms would get the contract in country x which wasn't the cheapest or most efficient way to get some project done or the best way to develop experience (capacity) in these countries all the while making the US firms rich). That was bad so development economists tried to get away from that. There are lots of criticisms about development ore the years and many, many changes have been made to policy. But never did anyone imply in my studies that countries tried to lure these poor countries into going into debt so they could then be enslaved by it. The guy admits his job was to fool people for how ever many years he had that supposed job of fooling nations, and you want me to undo all that I have learnt or read for 25 years and read a book that he, supposed fooler par excellance, writes? I'm just a little more judicious of who or what I read.
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JackRiddler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:22 PM
Response to Reply #10
11. If you're such an expert, what threat could reading the book have to you?
Edited on Wed Nov-09-11 12:24 PM by JackRiddler
I notice you don't claim to have worked at any of these technocracies, although you say you have read about them a great deal. So have I, and for at least as many years as you claim.

I notice you imply you haven't actually read Perkins, but refuse to do so because to read him would "undo all that" you say you "have learnt or read for 25 years."

Really? Are all your readings that flimsy? Is Perkins that dangerous?

So you content yourself with dismissing him on the basis of what you think is in his book. Nice.

You make no case for your naked assertion that he is lying factually about anything. You merely have your interpretation of his book, which you haven't read.

In other words, you are attacking him for telling the truth as he sees it in his book, after he quit a system he says was based on lying. This fact-free mode of defamation could be applied to any whistleblower, whether what they said was truthful or not.

That will do. Your argument is too simplistic and divorced from empirical consideration to merit further analysis.
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applegrove Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 03:01 PM
Response to Reply #11
12. My point is that I don't read c**p. What will work in development is international trade, capacity
Edited on Wed Nov-09-11 03:33 PM by applegrove
development, and girl child education.
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JackRiddler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 03:59 PM
Response to Reply #12
13. Actually, the only thing that ever worked was independent development and import substitution.
Edited on Wed Nov-09-11 04:46 PM by JackRiddler
"International trade" is a vague if common term, often used to cover exploitation and imbalances.

Contrary to the free-market religion, the empirical record is clear: From Manchester to Pusan and beyond, countries have achieved industrial take off by protection, not by opening markets to established competition or allowing foreign capital to dominate.

Certainly, as you say: girl child education. Also: clean water.

At any rate, you clearly have nothing to say about any of the subjects in the book by Perkins. And insisting you won't read it because you've decided it's crap makes you seem extremely close-minded and ignorant.

No biggie, though, from your tone and writing level I figure you would have had to start your "25 years" of research about 10 years before you were born.
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applegrove Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 06:39 PM
Response to Reply #13
14. Surely you can discuss issues without personal attacks. And countries like Kenya and Ghana are
Edited on Wed Nov-09-11 06:41 PM by applegrove
currently growing their middle classes because of international trade. When they tried import substitution they got nowhere. That doesn't mean international trade isn't tough. It is tough. But being poor is much tougher in my book.
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JackRiddler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 09:48 AM
Response to Reply #14
15. Well then maybe you can discuss Perkins's book without ad hominems on the author.
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bemildred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 11:01 AM
Response to Original message
8. It was quite readable. nt
Edited on Tue Nov-08-11 11:01 AM by bemildred
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BoredNow Donating Member (17 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 07:59 PM
Response to Original message
16. For those of you who are interested...
you can google - Confessions of an Economic Hit Man PDF - and you will find a couple free pfds for download.

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dipsydoodle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-25-11 04:17 AM
Response to Reply #16
17. Provides an insight
into the mechanics of US interference in Latin America.
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