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quakerboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 03:25 PM
Original message
First person Scifi/Fantasy books/authors?
Ive read an aweful lot, but I never really paid attention to what writing perspective an author chose.

Now I am. and I am wondering what books/authors are written/write in first person, because I cannot think of any, but i know they must be out there. If they are good books, so much the better.

Any suggestions to put on my list?
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Pharaoh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 03:29 PM
Response to Original message
1. I don't know
But Stephen Kings The Stand or his Gunslinger series are awesome!!!!!!!
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tibbiit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 03:29 PM
Response to Original message
2. Gateway?
fredrick pohl. Maybe?
tib
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TheWraith Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 03:39 PM
Response to Original message
3. I know a bunch in first person.
Edited on Sun Sep-25-11 03:40 PM by TheWraith
Heinlein used it a number of times--"The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" and "Double Star" off the top of my head, both of which are very worth reading.

There's also at least one good book I can think of from John Varley that does the same, imitating some of the stylings of "Double Star" actually. He's a big Heinlein fan.

"The Icarus Hunt" by Timothy Zahn, which is sort of half SF, half mystery novel. Also his novel "Deadman Switch."

The novella "The Power" by Murray Leinster is written mostly from a first person perspective in the form of several letters to a friend. Also his short story "A Logic Named Joe," which broke ground for basically predicting the modern day version of the internet--and being published in 1946.

The short story "Neutron Star" by Larry Niven.

The entire Amber series by Roger Zelazny, ten books of fantasy starting with "Nine Princes in Amber," is told from the first person, by one character in the first five books and another in the second five. The second five books also mix in a few SF elements in how they handle the technical aspects of magic.

I'd really recommend any and all of the above.
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quakerboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 07:46 PM
Response to Reply #3
13. Thanks
The Niven book definitely goes on the list. I remember not enjoying Zelazney, but with two recommendations here, maybe I will give it another try.

Heinlein, I just cant get into. I loved his books when I was an antisocial teenager with strong leanings toward libertarianism, but rereading them as an adult, they just don't draw me in like they used to. Unfortunately he was the only one that immediately popped into my mind for first person when my wife asked me for some first person SF/fan options.
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TheWraith Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Sep-26-11 01:43 AM
Response to Reply #13
18. Zelazny has his positives and his negatives.
The Amber series is the only thing of his that I've read beyond short fiction. I enjoy it, but it has it's faults too. If you scratch the surface, it has the feeling that he was kind of making it up as he went along. Obviously that's true of a lot of fiction, but I mean it more deeply here. He had difficulty keeping some of the mechanics of time flow straight, and the first part of the first book really doesn't have the same "feel" as the later books, like he was trying to nail down the style, and never went back to rewrite it once he got a firm grasp on the concept.

Still, it's adventurous and entertaining, particularly if you enjoy the snarkily witty commentary by the protagonist. In some ways the latter five books are better, since by then he had the style down, and seemed to have a better grasp on long-term storytelling. Although those books leave a few loose ends, since he intended to have a final five books to complete the story, but died before he could write them.
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ZombieHorde Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 04:14 PM
Response to Original message
4. The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss.
Easily one of my favorite fantasy novels. It is more smart than flash, so some may be bored by it, but I think the writing and story more than make up for the lack constant magic, monsters, and fighting. The book has magic, monsters, and fighting, just not as much as most fantasy books.

It is about a man telling his life story to a famous scribe, so it's a fake autobiography.

It's awesome.
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n2doc Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 04:29 PM
Response to Original message
5. Several newer ones come to mind
The sky so big and black by John Barnes

Old Man's War by John Scalzi


One older classic story for some reason comes to mind : I have no Mouth and I must Scream By Harlan Ellison . But there are tons written that way.
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quakerboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 07:38 PM
Response to Reply #5
12. Interesting
Ive noticed both of those authors on the shelf, but never gotten around to actually reading any of their stuff. Thanks
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n2doc Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 07:55 PM
Response to Reply #12
14. Scalzi is very much in the early Heinlein mode
Barnes is much darker in tone. Don't bother with his latest, he apparently has followed Orson Scott Card off into T-bag land. But I can say his earlier novels are quite good and innovative. "Candle" is another good one from him, but it is god awfully bleak and nasty at times.
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villager Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 04:59 PM
Response to Original message
6. Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler, the "Danger Boy" time travel books for young readers
Edited on Sun Sep-25-11 05:05 PM by villager
(the latter have rotating first person narrators, including a recurring sentient dinosaur)

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Mac1949 Donating Member (168 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 05:02 PM
Response to Original message
7. The Space Merchants by Pohl and Kornbluth is one...
Edited on Sun Sep-25-11 05:03 PM by Mac1949
I think there were also several by Mack Reynolds and many of Edgar Rice Burroughs (Beyond the Farthest Star springs to mind). L. Sprague De Camps Timehunters series (A Gun For Dinosaur, etc) and the excellent Stainless Steel Rat series by Harry Harrison. I keep thinking G. C. Edmondson, either The Aluminum Man or The Ship That Sailed The Time Stream, but I'm not certain, and I can't get to my books at the moment to check. Many of Zelazney's also, but they're fantasy as opposed to straight SF. Hope this is at least a little help.
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quakerboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 07:37 PM
Response to Reply #7
11. That is helpful
Do you happen to recall if Burroughs carter of mars stuff is first person? Its been a long time since I read those.

Stainless steel rat, I just re-read the last of that series again about 2 months back and never noticed it was first person.

Im not a huge Zelazney fan. But I may take a look again. I am actually trying to find books for my wife to read. She was hesitant to read books, then found some first person, and realised that that was the only way she could relate to the book and enjoy it, so I am trying to find options that we both can appreciate.
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Mac1949 Donating Member (168 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 08:12 PM
Response to Reply #11
15. Yes, the Mars series was first person...
I think most of ERB's stuff was. If you're looking for first-person fiction your wife might enjoy, you might try Wicked Appetite by Janet Evanovitch. It's the first of a series heavy on the supernatural-secret society-good versus evil elements. A little too romancey for me, but amusing in spots. My s/o loved it.

Also in SF: Wasp, as well as The Space Willies, both by Erik Frank Russell, the first a serious novel about subversion of a planets war economy, the second very similar, but played more for humor. I'm pretty sure both were first person, but as I mentioned, I can't get to my books anytime soon, so I'm trying to do this from memory.
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bengalherder Donating Member (718 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 05:49 PM
Response to Original message
8. Transmigration of Timothy Archer
Edited on Sun Sep-25-11 05:50 PM by bengalherder


I think Phil Dick's 'Transmigration of Timothy Archer' is one of the most interesting and lyrical 'SF'novels around and it is first person as well.

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pitohui Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Sep-26-11 10:32 PM
Response to Reply #8
19. Valis as well EOM
.
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GreenPartyVoter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 06:11 PM
Response to Original message
9. I have one of each for you. :^) (links inside)
Edited on Sun Sep-25-11 06:16 PM by GreenPartyVoter
http://www.watt-evans.com/nightsidecity.html

http://www.mythadventures.net / (This one is a series. You'll have to find the first one, "Another Fine Myth" to get started.)
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quakerboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 07:33 PM
Response to Reply #9
10. Well now I feel like a dunce
I just finished reading one of the Myth adventures yesterday. And I never even noticed the first person-ness of it.
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GreenPartyVoter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 09:27 PM
Response to Reply #10
17. LOL That's a sign of an engrossing story, I guess?
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pscot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-25-11 09:24 PM
Response to Original message
16. Snow Crash
That book is a rush. Highly recommended.
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skippercollector Donating Member (26 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-03-11 06:43 PM
Response to Reply #16
20. celtic novel
One of umpteem Celtic/Irish fantasy novels, Juliet Marrillier's "Son of Shadows," plus her other books in the series.
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-04-11 01:58 AM
Response to Original message
21. Just sent 2 back to the library written in 1st person..
They were by Jeff Shelby (Killer Swell & Wicked Break) and were the first two of a series. I glanced thru and the author's 1st person seemed too knowing and too perfect.

I've only liked a few 1st person books - and they were by authors who disparaged or kidded themselves, admitted mistakes, attractions to the wrong people, regret and other faults. They were human and I was fond of them.

You mentioned Sci-Fi books, but I figured you might not mind remarks about mysteries...
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ForeverFlashy Donating Member (25 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-25-11 11:10 PM
Response to Reply #21
23. Lol...
I actually don't hate books written in first person perspective, but I just don't like them either. I really like it when the narrative is done in third person, for reasons I don't know exactly why. I just like them that way. Period.
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Moe Shinola Donating Member (42 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-06-11 09:31 PM
Response to Original message
22. The Shadow of the Torturer, by Gene Wolfe...
...is written in the first-person, I believe.
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Sabriel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 08:12 PM
Response to Original message
24. Emergence, by David Palmer
Not only is it first-person, but the author has his protagonist speak in Pittman shorthand.

It's highly unusual, but once you get used to the shorthand, it's amazing.
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krispos42 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-05-11 01:09 AM
Response to Original message
25. "The Case of the Toxic Spell Dump" by Harry Turtledove comes to mind
It's pretty funny, with loads of puns and parallels to our universe. :-)


Um... I can think of two more off the top of my head, "Dreadnaught!" and "Battlestations!", both by Diane Carey, both ST:TOS novels.


I feel like Niven wrote something in first person, too, but I can't recall it. Maybe I'm wrong.
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