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Any advice for someone jonesing for more Jane Austen? My daughter

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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:09 PM
Original message
Any advice for someone jonesing for more Jane Austen? My daughter
just read all of Austen's novels and wants more!
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librechik Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:13 PM
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1. read some of the parodies--Pride and Prejudice and Zombies
or if she's not so inclined, move over to the Bronte sisters--lots of good stuff there
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PassingFair Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:14 PM
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2. Bridget Jones!
If she hasn't already read them.
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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:15 PM
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3. how old is she?
She could start reading actual British history, which is amazingly interesting and filled with killing and romance.

There are so so many amazing web sites regarding British life, for background.

Here's one:

http://www.elizabethan.org/compendium/86.html
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msedano Donating Member (682 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:17 PM
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4. margaret atwood
austen's unmatchable in the 19th century. poetry, emily dickinson. atwood possesses a strong voice and viewpoint. The Robber Bride is a superb novel. The Handmaid's Tale a mature reader's fable. Penelopiad a great add-on to the Odyssey.

good for you, having a daughter who reads. better for her, she reads.

Like Water for Chocolate, Laura Esquivel, is a good novel of manners, of a sort. Ana Castillo's Peel My Love Like an Onion for a mature reader, and especially women approaching early middle age. Castillo's So Far From God is accessible and suitable for a younger reader.

regards,
mvs
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:40 PM
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5. I solved my problem....
I ran out of a certain author and couldn't stop thinking about him and the characters I'd grown to love, so I started the series all over again. I have the last one yet to read, and am saving it the way you save your dessert for after a meal...

To my surprise, there was so much I'd missed and forgotten that I enjoyed them more the 2nd Time Around. Frank has confirmed that....

Tell her to get Book 1 again and feast on it...
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FSogol Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:41 PM
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6. Charlotte Bronte n/t
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enough Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:53 PM
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7. Anthony Trollope.
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pscot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-17-11 06:02 PM
Response to Reply #7
14. Definitely Trollope
Barchester Towers, The Warden
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TygrBright Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 01:56 PM
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8. Trollope. Or for lowbrow, guilty pleasure: Heyer. n/t
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yardwork Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-02-11 03:09 PM
Response to Reply #8
10. Georgette Heyer IS a lot of fun, and I don't think it's really lowbrow.
It took me years to collect all her books - most of them ratty used paperbacks - and I'm not giving them up! Reading her books is like eating a whole box of chocolates.
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TheCentepedeShoes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-11 09:11 PM
Response to Reply #10
13. I have never been into "romance"
novels but Georgette Heyer also wrote mysteries
That's how I found her, with reprints in the mystery section of a Bookstop store about 17-18 years ago
Duplicate Death, The Unfinished Clue... I had more but they have been donated for the library book sale
I think I have a couple in the bottom drawer of my desk at work
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-23-11 06:06 PM
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9. Thanks - I was thinking of Vanity Fair myself. She's suspicious of Wuthering Heights
having seen a bad film version. She did ask me "Is Jane Eyre any good?" :o
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yardwork Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-02-11 03:10 PM
Response to Reply #9
11. Wuthering Heights is a great read.
Edited on Sat Jul-02-11 03:11 PM by yardwork
Edited to add - so is Vanity Fair and so is Jane Eyre!
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mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-03-11 10:54 AM
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12. my daughter loves
Thomas Hardy
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BookSavoury Donating Member (14 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-03-11 02:37 PM
Response to Original message
15. Maria Edgeworth
She was an Irish writer. Austen admired her very much, so much that she defended Edgeworth for writing novels in Austen's first published book, Northanger Abbey.

Belinda is a good start.

Edgeworth had a good sense of humor, something that a lot of people appreciate about Austen, too. (Edgeworth's first name, Maria, is pronounced Moria, just to note.)

George Eliot is another good female author. Silas Marner is one of her classics. She wrote a lot of books well worth reading. She lived and worked a little bit later than Austen.

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