Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

What was your favorite book as a kid?

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Books: Fiction Donate to DU
 
JitterbugPerfume Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:45 AM
Original message
What was your favorite book as a kid?
Mine is Good Morning Miss Dove by Frances Priven. It is about a very cool school teacher who loved being challenged .

The kids dared her to eat an ant , and she (of course) ate one . They asked her what it tasted like and she replied "vinegar."

I checked out Amazon for a used copy and found out that a 1954 copy is very costly --dammit
Refresh | +1 Recommendations Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
Chipper Chat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:46 AM
Response to Original message
1. The Island Stallion
by Walter Farley
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
peace frog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:47 AM
Response to Original message
2. The Yearling by Majorie Kinnan Rawlings
Edited on Thu Feb-17-11 11:33 AM by peace frog
A Tree Grows In Brooklyn by Betty Smith

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein



Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
WCGreen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:48 AM
Response to Original message
3. My side of the mountain...
Or Gone Away Lake...
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
asjr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:48 AM
Response to Original message
4. All the Nancy Drew mysteries.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
LibDemAlways Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:55 AM
Response to Reply #4
9. I devoured those too. I have a 17-year-old
daughter. When she was 9 or 10 I tried to get her interested. No way. Times and tastes have changed I guess.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Mz Pip Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-20-11 11:53 AM
Response to Reply #4
27. I loved those
I have a collection of the very old lavender and orange ones from the 30s and then most of the dark blue ones from the 50s.

I have vivid memories of being 9 years old and getting 5 of them for Christmas. I was so excited.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-13-11 10:41 AM
Response to Reply #27
72. Mu 12yo niece loves the Nancy Drew books.
She is taking after my mom in liking mystery stuff, they both watch CSI religiously, LOL.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
mainer Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-20-11 03:39 PM
Response to Reply #4
28. Yep. She was a role model for independent-minded girls
She had a car, a boyfriend, and no curfew! Plus she brought down bad guys.

And she had that friend George who --oh, come on -- just had to be lesbian.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Luciferous Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-25-11 10:18 PM
Response to Reply #4
42. I read all of those when I was pretty young. My mom had all of them from when she was a kid,
and I bought copies of them for my daughter.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
HereSince1628 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:49 AM
Response to Original message
5. The Ghost of Dibble Hollow.
The ghost played a harmonica. I was deeply into harmonica as a 10 year old.

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-26-11 07:25 PM
Response to Reply #5
43. Truly?
I've never heard of ANYONE who read this book besides me. I got it in a book order, read it until it disintegrated, and eventually forgot about it.

Years later, it popped into my head, and I realized that my first child's first and middle names came directly from that book, although I wasn't thinking of the book at the time.

I found a tattered old copy in a used book store; it has a place of honor in the house.

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-26-11 07:27 PM
Response to Reply #43
44. My side of the mountain.
For decades after reading that book, I wanted to BE Sam. I greatly resented his family's intrusion.

I'm 50 years old now, and I STILL want to be Sam on some days.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Glorfindel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:50 AM
Response to Original message
6. "Tom Sawyer" and "Huckleberry Finn" (tie)
I remember "Good Morning, Miss Dove," too. I also liked the two Jungle Books by Rudyard Kipling and anything involving adventure and/or science fiction. I was nine years old in 1954, so I guess I read Miss Dove several years after it was published. Our house was always full of books, and I'll always be grateful to my parents for that.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
JitterbugPerfume Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 11:04 AM
Response to Reply #6
12. I read the "Just So stories" to my kids
A camels hump is an ugly lump

that you can see at the zoo

But uglier yet , is the hump you get

When you have nothing to do!

My sister gave me the two book set for my birthday last year. It was a book club selection in 1956!
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
JitterbugPerfume Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-20-11 06:25 PM
Response to Reply #6
29. the only book my parents read was the Bible,
but all four of my siblings are (were) readers .
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
calimary Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:51 AM
Response to Original message
7. Eloise.
All things Eloise. There were four books - the original "Eloise," "Eloise in Paris," "Eloise in Moscow," and "Eloise at Christmastime." By Kay Thompson, illustrated by the BRILLIANT Hilary Knight. Man, I poured over every illustration for hours.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
ChiciB1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:54 AM
Response to Original message
8. Great Expectations.... Charles Dickens & Can't Say Why Now! BUT
because of it I named my first dog "Pip" from the book!

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Voice for Peace Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:56 AM
Response to Original message
10. harold and the purple crayon.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
FSogol Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 10:58 AM
Response to Original message
11. "Andrew Henry's Meadow" by Doris Burns (1965)
That book launched my creativity and influenced my entire life.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
inademv Donating Member (738 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 11:07 AM
Response to Original message
13. The Giver
For some reason the notion of that kind of burden bearing appealed to me.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
no_hypocrisy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 11:09 AM
Response to Original message
14. Can't remember the title but
Edited on Thu Feb-17-11 11:23 AM by no_hypocrisy
it's a story about a little boy with three names like Robert Louis Weatherby. He refused to go to school and issues started coming up. He went for a walk and got lost going home because he could not read the signs. He was hungry and his mother would make him an apple pie if he could bring her 8 apples but it never happened because he couldn't count. Finally, his uncle told him that he would give the kid a pony if he wrote to him but the kid couldn't write a word.

So he went back to school with all due eagerness even though he was a much older child and could barely fit in a desk.

Loved that book because it stressed that if you wanted to be smart, self-sufficient, independent, autonomous, part of the world, you HAD TO LEARN and KEEP LEARNING.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-18-11 02:05 PM
Response to Reply #14
23. I sent a copy of your email
to my librarian and asked her to ask the children's librarians if the book sounds familiar to any of them.

Will let you know if I hear from them...
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
no_hypocrisy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-19-11 10:08 AM
Response to Reply #23
24. Wow! Thanks.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-01-11 04:02 PM
Response to Reply #24
47. No got - but Library sent a long reply with a suggested title...
... apologize for taking so long to get back to you about your question. I did spend considerable time, searching our various sources to find this title, but I have to admit I was unable to find it. The information given, while pretty much a complete story line, is very general and about broad categories, such as reading and school, for which there are hundreds of titles. Without something more specific to go on, I cannot locate this exact book.

Our library does have a similar title, LOUIS JAMES HATES SCHOOL by Bill Morrison, in which Louis James throws out his books and runs away to find a job, only to find he fails at all the good jobs because he cannot read. However, I do not think this is the book you were looking for; the story line doesnt quite fit.

Again, I apologize for not being able to answer your question.

Sincerely,
Janet xxxxx
Youth Services Coordinator
St. Clair County Library
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-01-11 04:15 PM
Response to Reply #24
48. Delete
Edited on Tue Mar-01-11 04:16 PM by fadedrose







Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
AngryOldDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Feb-23-11 05:37 PM
Response to Reply #14
40. Is it Robert Francis Weatherby by Munro Leaf?
Sounded familiar to me, so I checked the Google. Amazingly, it's still available and is rather pricey.

FYI:

http://www.alibris.com/search/books/qwork/5781778/used/...
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Lochloosa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 11:12 AM
Response to Original message
15. The Wahoo Bobcat by Joseph A. Lippincott
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
LynneSin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 11:22 AM
Response to Original message
16. Fantastic Mr Fox by Roald Dahl. I own a 1st Edition copy of it
Edited on Thu Feb-17-11 11:24 AM by LynneSin
I was so worried I'd hate the movie. Wes Anderson did a stop-motion animation of the book. The book isn't that long of a story like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory so Anderson had to add some back story to get a 2 hour movie. I was worried he'd ruin what I considered the most magical book I have ever read.

So I wouldn't see the movie in the theater, I didn't want to ruin the book. But when HBO showed the movie I finally watched it - and I fell in love with it. Anderson stayed true to the story but enhanced it in a way that made it enjoyable. And it was a killer casting to have George Clooney as the voice of Fantastic Mr. Fox. When I was a kid, Mr Fox was like my idea husband and Clooney fits that role today! Meryl Streep rocked it as the wife.

BTW current copies of the book have crappy artwork. You need to find an earlier edition to get the really great artwork, which is what Anderson used to create the world in the movie.

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
left is right Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 11:37 AM
Response to Original message
17. Stone Soup also
The 100 Dresses, I am afraid that my selection marks me as older than most of you all
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Doc_Technical Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 01:48 PM
Response to Original message
18. Falling through space (Wings of War) by Richard Hillary
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 03:49 PM
Response to Original message
19. Robinson Crusoe
Edited on Thu Feb-17-11 03:50 PM by fadedrose
I was about 12 or so, maybe 13, when I read it.

Any earlier than that, can't recall anything but comic books even though the nuns made us go to the library sooner than that.

I adored comic books.

R
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 03:57 PM
Response to Original message
20. I saw the movie when I was a Jr or Sr in high school
Looked it up - refreshed my memory and recall that I liked the movie; it was good but sad.

GOOD MORNING, MISS DOVE (1955)

Starring Jennifer Jones, Robert Stack, Kipp Hamilton, Robert Douglas, Peggy Knudsen,
Jerry Paris, Mary Wickes
Directed by Henry Koster

Print: color
Runtime: 107 min.
Genre: drama

Miss Dove is a strict disciplinary, plus a well respected teacher, who has inspired her students to individual greatness. One day during class, Miss Dove experiences great pain in her back, but continues with the class. After class she asks one of her students who is staying after class to get a doctor. Thomas, a doctor, and a former student of her's takes her to the hospital and hospitalizes her. While in the hospital her former students rally around her causing Miss Dove to reflect on her past.




Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
SheilaT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-17-11 09:47 PM
Response to Original message
21. Almost too many to mention.l
But I did love Good Morning Miss Dove. It's the kind of gentle story that they just don't publish any more, and that today's kids might find boring.

I loved the Susannah series by Muriel Denison: Susannah of the Mounties, Susannah of the Yukon, Susannah at Boarding School (my absolute favorite of the lot and I scored a copy of it on Amazon several years ago), and Susannah Rides Again. A truly dreadful Shirley Temple movie was made of the first, which completely bastardized the meaning of the book.

I also liked the Silver Chief books.

I also read lots of science fiction from an early age.

Oh, and a book called Mysterious Island and another one called Mystery in Old Quebec, both of which came from some kind of kids' book club my sister belonged to.

But one favorite? Couldn't begin to choose. And as others add entries here, I'll be saying to myself, Yep, liked that one too.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
BlueIris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-18-11 01:36 PM
Response to Original message
22. The Pink Hotel.
Or Charlotte's Web.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
JitterbugPerfume Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-21-11 02:40 PM
Response to Reply #22
32. my oldest daughter loved Charlotte's Web
as a child, and now she reads it to her grandchildren!
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DUgosh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-22-11 11:11 PM
Response to Reply #22
58. I loved
The Pink Hotel
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Curmudgeoness Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-19-11 07:04 PM
Response to Original message
25. Black Beauty. I still have my original copy from childhood.
I re-read it about a year ago and it is still a great book.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
SheilaT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-21-11 03:38 PM
Response to Reply #25
33. I read Black Beauty out loud to my
oldest when he was about four or five, and it struck me quite strongly that the book is about slavery. The evils thereof.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Curmudgeoness Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-21-11 06:08 PM
Response to Reply #33
34. I never realized it was about slavery, although I can see the connection.
It actually was the first call for humane treatment of animals, and at the time it was written, it was very controversial. It started the animal rights movement.

Sad sad story.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
SheilaT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-21-11 10:54 PM
Response to Reply #34
36. I have no idea if Black Beauty's being about
slavery is a generally accepted interpretation, but as I was reading the book, it just seemed to be so strong. I think I might have been vaguely aware that it was the start of the animal rights movement, but I'll tell you, the horse, Black Beauty, is not just a horse, but is clearly a representative of all down-trodden and abused people everywhere.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Curmudgeoness Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-22-11 06:15 PM
Response to Reply #36
37. Your interpretation gives me chills, when I think about it...
that just jumps out at me. I will never read this book again without this thought in my head. Animals treated like slaves, slaves treated like animals.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DUgosh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-19-11 11:04 PM
Response to Original message
26. Trixie Belden
teen mysteries
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Luciferous Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-25-11 10:16 PM
Response to Reply #26
41. Ha, I remember those.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Lex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-08-11 10:58 PM
Response to Reply #26
61. Yes those were great.
Loved those way better than Nancy Drew or the The Hardy Boys.

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-13-11 10:33 AM
Response to Reply #26
70. We have a huge stack of those books from the 50s and 60s at thrift store i work at.
Along with some OLD Hardy Boys books! :)
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
closeupready Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-21-11 07:18 AM
Response to Original message
30. A Spell for Chameleon - first book I ever read in one sitting!
Zelazney's Amber books would be an honorable mention, as would Wrinkle in Time and The Hobbit.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
raccoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-21-11 09:05 AM
Response to Original message
31. What age kid? Eight, nine, I'd say HEIDI. nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
KC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-21-11 09:52 PM
Response to Original message
35. The
Hardy Boy series

Follow My Leader

Amelia Earhart
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
pscot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Feb-22-11 10:18 PM
Response to Original message
38. Call It Courage by ArmstrongSperry
I read it back in the 50's, but I believe it's still in print. Wikipedia tells me a musical version was produced last year. Must be the appeal of the South Seas locale. It's a wonderful book for boys 11 or 12 and up.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
AngryOldDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Feb-23-11 05:32 PM
Response to Original message
39. Charlotte's Web.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
bread_and_roses Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-27-11 02:19 PM
Response to Original message
45. "Old Bones, the Wonder Horse"
The story of the great racehorse, Exterminator. These days printed under the name - I think - "Kentucky Derby Champion" - Mildred Pace something?
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Uta Donating Member (110 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-05-11 01:59 PM
Response to Reply #45
51. I loved "Old Bones" ugly ducking makes good story nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Uta Donating Member (110 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-05-11 02:02 PM
Response to Reply #51
52. Also
When I was very young, I loved, "Make Way for Ducklings"
then later

My Side of the Mountain
Black Beauty
A Wrinkle in Time
The Lions Paw
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Tracer Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-01-11 10:17 AM
Response to Original message
46. Three that I loved as a child:
The Secret Garden. Read and re-read many times.

Nobody's Girl and Nobody's Boy. By Hector Malot. These books were written 100 years ago and tell the stories of plucky young French children overcoming tragedy and obstacles in their lives.

Loved them.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
TheCentepedeShoes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-02-11 08:06 PM
Response to Original message
49. The World at Bay
by Paul Capon (had to look up the author)
I must have had that book on permanent check out from the bookmobile
Alien invasion, Earth fights back
But I think it was the end of my SiFi interest
Once I discovered Agatha Christie I was hooked on the "cozies"
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
KusaVariola Donating Member (8 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-03-11 09:36 PM
Response to Original message
50. Four books
Well, for when I was 5-6, I liked Harry Potter. I don't anymore because the slow, boring movie(s) killed it for me.
Later, I liked the whole series (or world)that Tamora Pierce has written. They wouldn't let me check it out at my school library; of course I liked it. It was also very feminist.
When I was eleven or twelve, I liked Before I Die. I was slightly depressed by family issues, and found it comforting that someone could write something more depressing than my poetry.
After that, I liked the Jean Auel books, especially the second one. They were forbidden, with my family, and were also excellent for a developing child like myself at that time.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Vehl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-09-11 02:44 PM
Response to Original message
53. The Famous five series by Enid Blyton
I loved those books!


The Famous Five is the name of a series of children's novels written by British author Enid Blyton. The first book, Five on a Treasure Island, was published in 1942.

The novels feature the adventures of a group of young children Julian, Dick, Anne and Georgina (George) and their dog Timmy. Blyton created several similar groups for her detective series, including The Secret Seven, The Adventurous Four (not to be confused with The Adventure Series) and Five Find-Outers, but the Famous Five is the best-known and most popular of these.

Blyton only intended to write about 6 to 8 books in the series but, owing to their high sales and immense commercial success, she went on to write 21 full-length Famous Five novels. By the end of 1953, more than 6 million copies of these books had been printed and sold. Today, more than two million copies of the books are sold each year, making them one of the biggest-selling series for



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Famous_Five_%28series%...
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
japple Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Mar-09-11 07:04 PM
Response to Original message
54. Sydney Taylor's book, All-of-a-Kind-Family. Lois Lenski's books
and Tales of the Arabian Knights.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Sequoia Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-10-11 06:26 PM
Response to Original message
55. Island of the Blue Dolphin
and, "Heidi".
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Doris32r Donating Member (60 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-12-11 11:31 PM
Response to Original message
56. "The Outsiders"
S.E. Hinton - just about anything she wrote really. Very powerful books.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
northoftheborder Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-22-11 08:44 PM
Response to Original message
57. Little Women, and other Alcott books
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
skippercollector Donating Member (26 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-08-11 09:00 PM
Response to Original message
59. carolyn haywood
Between third and seventh grade I devoured every Carolyn Haywood novel the local library had. As an adult, if I find her books at garage sales or antique shows, I buy them. My favorite was Snowbound with Betsy. I still remember lying on the couch reading it when I was in fourth grade.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Lex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-08-11 10:57 PM
Response to Original message
60. I read all the "Little House on the Prairie" series and LOVED them.
Nancy Drew, Trixie Belden, Hardy Boys, Sherlock Holmes.
Kind of a mystery-reader from way back, like 8 or 9 years old.


Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-08-11 11:42 PM
Response to Original message
62. The McKeesport Bell Telephone Directory
We got our first phone, a party line, when I was 11. Looked through that that phone book for years. It's still a time waster..
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Free Tibet 2011 Donating Member (11 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-09-11 09:13 AM
Response to Original message
63. Anyone remember...
choose your own adventure books?

When I was in grade school I liked those books. I also liked a lot of Roald Dahl's novels.

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Lex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-09-11 09:54 AM
Response to Reply #63
64. My little brother loved, loved, loved those
choose your own adventure books. I liked the Roald Dahl novels. Some of those were creepy short-stories too, if I recall correctly?

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
cdsilv Donating Member (883 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Sep-10-11 11:48 AM
Response to Reply #64
65. Sut Lovingood - the adventures of a 'damn fool...
Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book, The Mowgli Stories, and most of his other work.

I also inherited my grandfather's 'The Compleat Sherlock Holmes' - all of the Holmes stories that Arthur Conan Doyle wrote in one large Volume.

All of the above books I pretty much inherited from him through my mother.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Sep-10-11 02:28 PM
Response to Original message
66. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
Sisaruus Donating Member (703 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Sep-11-11 06:37 PM
Response to Original message
67. The Boxcar Children
I wanted to become a homeless orphan, too.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
jannyk Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Sep-12-11 01:36 PM
Response to Original message
68. When I was a little kid it was Enid Blyton's 'The Wishing Chair' then
...when I was about 10, it was the 'Famous Five' series - also by Blyton. I loved those books!
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
pitohui Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Sep-12-11 08:25 PM
Response to Original message
69. so many wonderful books!
i probably had a different favorite every week for i recognize many of these titles as "flavor of the week," ha ha

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Sep-13-11 10:36 AM
Response to Original message
71. The Boxcar Children and the Magic School Bus books.
Edited on Tue Sep-13-11 10:38 AM by Odin2005
We got a Magic School Bus book on dinosaurs that I loved as a kid at the thrift store yesterday and I felt so nostalgic I cried when i ran into the line by the new girl "we weren't allowed to get this close to predators at my old school!"
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Thu Oct 02nd 2014, 11:52 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Books: Fiction Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC