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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-10-11 01:33 AM
Original message
Who is your favorite fictional character, or your 2 favorite characters
if you like, and tell us a little about each one.
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pa28 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-10-11 02:23 AM
Response to Original message
1. Henry Chinaski.
No use describing him. You have to just read and decide if it means something to you.

Chinaski has a polarizing effect on an audience and that's part of the appeal.

My second favorite is Alfred Jarry's "Ubu" for similar reasons.
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Orrex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-18-11 09:57 PM
Response to Reply #1
13. Chinaski is an excellent choice
:thumbsup:
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LuvNewcastle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-10-11 04:37 AM
Response to Original message
2. Prince Myshkin and Tyler Durden
Myshkin was the main character in "The Idiot." He earned the nickname by telling the truth and being good to everyone.

Tyler Durden was a character within a character in "Fight Club." Tyler used his personality to accomplish things for his host which would never have been accomplished by the host alone.
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Nay Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-10-11 05:53 AM
Response to Original message
3. Jack Reacher, in the novels by Lee Child.
A loner-type guy with a great heart who is a modern-day knight on a white horse. Love the books.
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LearnedHand Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-08-11 10:44 PM
Response to Reply #3
32. I like Jack Reacher too
Interesting premise, to have a (deliberately) homeless veteran be the major character.
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BlueIris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-10-11 08:02 AM
Response to Original message
4. Smilla Jasperson.
Isolated cynic and nonconformist, well dressed and exploitive of her father's love when necessary (especially when the necessary is helping murdered little boys.)

One of the more original heroines of mystery fiction, though in my rereads of Smilla's Sense of Snow, she comes off like a borderline sociopath in parts.
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LearnedHand Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-08-11 10:45 PM
Response to Reply #4
33. I LOVED that book!!!
Loved her, too. (hated the movie)
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abluelady Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-10-11 10:40 AM
Response to Original message
5. A Little Embarrassing, but
I would love to have Roarke from J.D. Robb's books in my life.
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JitterbugPerfume Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-10-11 10:05 PM
Response to Original message
6.  OK I admit it
I love Heathcliff . I am attracted to bad boys :evilgrin:
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Feb-10-11 10:46 PM
Response to Original message
7. 2 - Charlie & Daisy
Charlie Moon is irrascible, tells fibs to confuse people, tricks, and loves to watch his Aunt Daisy terrorize some fool...he's handsome, a Ute Indian, 7 1/2 feet tall.... loves animals and when doing work as a lawman has his own system of justice. Anybody's conversation with Charlie is worth reading.

Aunt Daisy is nasty, rude, old and wrinkled, greedy, self-serving, plays tricks, lies, selfish, and her creator, James Doss, is madly in love with her and so am I.

Both are in the Doss series books.
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-18-11 04:11 PM
Response to Reply #7
12. That's my Daisy...
Edited on Fri Feb-18-11 04:15 PM by fadedrose
Can't print actual sentences, I don't think, copyright stuff, etc.

How does Doss know women so well? I just bumped into this paragraph (in Shadow Man,

paraphrasing:

Daisy doesn't like when Charlie has a white girlfriend (which seems to be all he ever has. She only likes Indian women and not all types.

They are sitting at a restaurant, Charlie, Daisy, friend Scott, and very pretty girlfriend, FBI Agent McTeague. McTeague & Charlie are making goo-goo eyes. It's Daisy's birthday; she opened Charlie and Scott's gifts, then opened McTeague's, which was wrapped in embroidered white cotton and a ribbon of Japanese silk. It was a beautiful Spanish scarf. Daisy thought it's a knock-off for sure and made in China.

While everyone watched, she read the tiny label, and it said, "Made in Barcelona." Daisy thought to herself - "Well. I guess she's trying to impress me. Which just went to show how calculating and sneaky these men-hunting white women could be.
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mvccd1000 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-11-11 12:23 AM
Response to Original message
8. Travis McGee
Not sure such a character could exist outside of his era, but I sure enjoyed reading of his adventures.

Hieronymus Bosch, or Spencer, or Jack Reacher have all provided many days of reading pleasure, as well.

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raccoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-11-11 08:39 AM
Response to Original message
9. Atticus Finch of TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. In his 50's, Atticus is a lawyer in a small Southern town
during the 1930's. For the time and place he lived in, Atticus is a remarkably progressive thinker.

I wonder sometimes if Atticus is in Al-Anon ( :silly:), because he sure works a kick-butt Al-Anon program. Ever notice how many times in the novel Atticus says of some family or individual, "That's just their way," or something similar?

(2) Huckleberry Finn. Discovered him when I was in junior high. Huck was so...genuine. Yes, I know he was a good liar, constantly making up aliases and backgrounds for himself as he traveled. But as the narrator, he is always very straight with the reader.



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mentalsolstice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-15-11 08:22 PM
Response to Reply #9
52. I became a lawyer because of him
Edited on Thu Sep-15-11 08:22 PM by mentalsolstice
Unfortunately, I didn't stick with the profession as there were very few that remotely lived up to his standard. :-(
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FSogol Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-13-11 08:50 PM
Response to Original message
10. Yossarian from "Catch 22" and or Dove from Nelson Algren's" Walk on the Wild Side".
Edited on Sun Feb-13-11 08:54 PM by FSogol
Or Marlow or Jim from "Lord Jim"?
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pscot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-10-11 01:29 PM
Response to Reply #10
35. That book is one of my all time favorites
"to the destructive element commit yourself and with the motion of your hands and feet make the deep, deep sea hold you up". That's probably not exact. And Heart of Darkness is one of the greatest stories ever written.
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DUgosh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-13-11 10:12 PM
Response to Original message
11. Sigrid Harald
Margaret Maron's character she calls the "red headed stepchild" of her other popular character Judge Deborah Knott. Jack Daniels from J A Konrath. Any day spent with Doc Ford and Tomlinson from presented by Randy Wayne White is a good day.
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Orrex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-18-11 09:58 PM
Response to Original message
14. My two
Kilgore Trout

The Judge
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JitterbugPerfume Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-01-11 07:29 AM
Response to Reply #14
24. I just bought Venus on the Half Shell
I adore Kilgore and his alter ego
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Curmudgeoness Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-19-11 07:15 PM
Response to Original message
15. Skink from the Carl Hiaasen books.
He was the governor of Florida who just walked off the job one day and went to live in the swamps. When you mention "character", this is it.
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japple Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-19-11 07:38 PM
Response to Original message
16. Owen Meany and Atticus Finch.
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Luciferous Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-25-11 10:25 PM
Response to Original message
17. Mr. Darcy from Pride and Prejudice
:loveya:
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-27-11 11:24 AM
Response to Original message
18. Two favorites?
Can't do it.

Here are some I love:

Kathleen Mallory: Highly intelligent, fundamentally damaged, functioning outside the norm
Hector Zaroni: Smart, flexible, deals with life and retains somehow the best of human characteristics
Sam Gamgee: I wish every man were Sam. Honest, brave, unflaggingly loyal, incorruptible.
Elizabeth Macpherson: Smart and funny; I wish McCrumb hadn't dumped on her life and then dumped her.
Huck Finn: I just like him.
Amelia Peabody: Smart, funny, a strong, independent-minded women cast during a time when women were anything but, and her character flaws make her even more lovable.
Harry Dresden: Reminds me of my son.
Yossarian: What can I say. He thinks and responds in a sane way in an insane world, and seems insane because of it.
Mary Russell: A fascinating, complex creature that makes Holmes more human, and more incredible, than Conan Doyle ever did.
Sam. I don't remember his last name, but I wanted to live in his tree on the mountain, to BE him, for decades.
Lessa: Small but mighty, there may never have been a stronger female character.
Mrs. Pollifax: senior citizen spy, she handily bucks the societal trend to worship youth and disdain age
Arthur and Merlin in most variations of their tale.

There are many more.

Here are some characters on my rotten apples list:

Bella Swan: Shallow, stupid, self-destructive, a terrible role model for teens.
Whatever his name was from the "Confederacy of Dunces." Too painfully dysfunctional, stupid, and annoying for humor or pathos.
Claire Fraser: An arrogance I just couldn't warm up to.
Guenevere: A bigoted christian and a shallow cheat.
Lancelot: Supposedly an incomparable warrior, but underneath, he's weak. He cheats and he betrays his best friend.


There are more of these, too, lol.





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mainer Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-27-11 07:14 PM
Response to Reply #18
19. Sounds like you've read the same books I have!
I never thought of Guinevere as a bigoted Christian, though. Just as a weak-willed woman who couldn't resist temptation.

But totally agree about Bella (ugh) Swan.
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-28-11 07:30 AM
Response to Reply #19
22. I think Guinevere is interpreted differently by different authors,
so it probably depends on which version made the biggest impression on the reader. I've read a bunch of different versions that I liked, including one by Guy Gavriel Kay presenting her as a heroine.

My two favorites, though, are T.H. White's "The Once and Future King," in which she is a weak-willed woman, and Bradley's "Mists of Avalon," in which she is a bigoted xtian. I think, after reading "Avalon," I felt like Bradley had really nailed her, so that's the one that sticks with me.

As a teacher of middle school, it drives me insane to have my female students think Bella is "lucky." Fortunately, the latest hot series is distracting them, and the protagonist in that one is definitely smarter and more independent.
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Feb-27-11 07:29 PM
Response to Reply #18
20. I looked up and found Kathleen Mallory...
a detective in NY, by Carol O'Connor..

How many of the others you mentioned are in mysteries?

I gave up intellectual and educational stuff not too long ago. I stick to mysteries and am happy with them.

Thanks..
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LWolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-28-11 07:25 AM
Response to Reply #20
21. These:
Elizabeth Macpherson: author Sharon McCrumb. There are only a few of them.
Amelia Peabody: Not traditional mysteries; her adventures take place in Egypt, Howard Carter's time.
Harry Dresden: Again, not traditional mystery. He's a wizard with an office, hiring himself out to help people solve problems. Like a wizardly detective.
Mary Russell: Author Laurie King marries Sherlock Holmes off in his "retirement," and he and Mary continue to investigate his sorts of problems.
Mrs. Pollifax: senior citizen spy; more international skullduggery than pure mystery. Author Dorothy Gilman.

A few other mysteries on my shelves:

Marcia Muller and Sara Paretsky (authors)

Joanne/Joanna(?) Dobson's Karen Pelletier, a university professor who gets tangled in local murders

A bunch more; If I didn't have to go to work this morning, I'd browse the shelves for you. :D
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closeupready Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Feb-28-11 12:20 PM
Response to Original message
23. Bink and Corwin. Runner up: Pendergast.
n/t
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JitterbugPerfume Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-01-11 07:38 AM
Response to Original message
25. Arthur Dent and Ford Prefect
Two disfunctional guys exploring the galaxy in a magic spacship! You just can't beat that combo.
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KusaVariola Donating Member (8 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-03-11 09:44 PM
Response to Reply #25
29. Don't panic
Well, Ford and Dent are fine, but Zaphod is way better. Maybe it's just me... yeah, probably.
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AngryOldDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-01-11 04:48 PM
Response to Original message
26. Gordon LaChance, from Stephen King's "The Body".
Captures exactly what it was like during your last summer as being just a kid.
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BlueIris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-13-11 08:12 PM
Response to Reply #26
41. Awwww.
Except, I felt more for Teddy and Chris (poor Chris.)
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matt819 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-03-11 01:25 PM
Response to Original message
27. Several, of course
Jack Reacher
Elvis Cole and Joe Pike
The sheriff from the Ridley Pearson novels
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MrCoffee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-03-11 03:27 PM
Response to Original message
28. Lola Hart (Jack Womack's Random Acts of Senseless Violence)
The way Jack Womack writes her devolution is masterful, seamless and absolutely gutting.
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KusaVariola Donating Member (8 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-03-11 09:45 PM
Response to Original message
30. Bernard Marx and John the Savage
Well, they're from Brave New World... don't feel like explaining them. They're the two most human characters in the book.
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LearnedHand Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Mar-08-11 10:42 PM
Response to Original message
31. Sam Vimes, Hermione Grainger
Edited on Tue Mar-08-11 10:51 PM by LearnedHand
Too many to count, of course, but Sam Vimes (of the Watch) and Hermione Grainger come to mind. Sorry. I know the second is from a YA book, but I just love her character. I love that she's smart and the best in her year. Sam Vimes (Pratchett) is a FABULUOUS character. Alwys self-deprecating. Funny as hell without meaning to.

(I love many of the others mentioned in this thread as well, but whoever it was who hated Claire Fraser, you 'n me gonna have to meet in the woodshed!) :evilgrin:

Edited to spell Hermione's last name correctly and change the subject line.
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pscot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-10-11 01:21 PM
Response to Original message
34. Death and Yossarian
Death is the coolest character in Pratchett's disk world. Ordinarily I avoid people who ALWAYS SPEAK IN CAPITALS, but coming from him it seems perfectly natural. Esme Weatherwax and Granny Ogg are pretty special. Others include Huckleberry Finn, Lispeth Salander, Elizabeth Bennett, and the guy in the Telltale Heart who bricks up his enemy in the wall. Oh, and Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin.
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-10-11 03:19 PM
Response to Reply #34
36. Wasn't that Yossarian guy in Catch-22? eom
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pscot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-10-11 08:45 PM
Response to Reply #36
37. Indeed
I read that book while I was in the army. It explained an awful lot.
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-10-11 09:29 PM
Response to Reply #37
38. Loved it - saw the movie and read the book... eom
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SheilaT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-12-11 10:21 AM
Response to Original message
39. Daisy Clover.
The book Inside Daisy Clover by Gavin Lambert is written in the form of a diary kept by Daisy. It's the 1950's, she lives with her seriously disturbed mother (played in the film by Ruth Gordon) and dreams of stardom. Turns out she can sing, and sing really well. A record she sends off to a studio gets her onto the star-making merry-go-round. Daisy is feisty and utterly true to herself. In the end she won't succumb to the studio manipulations. It's one of only two or three books that immediately upon finishing the first time I went straight back to the beginning and read it again.

It was made into a movie, starring Natalie Wood in the title role, and it's for my money one her her two best movies ever, the other being This Property is Condemned. The movie is set in the Depression, some twenty years earlier than the setting of the novel. I'm not sure why, except possibly to make it clear that the studio of the novel/movie is not based on any real movie studio.

The book is still in print and is readily available. I warmly recommend it to any and all.
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-12-11 01:45 PM
Response to Reply #39
40. It's not a mystery, so I won't probably read it - but...
damned nice review you gave it - very tempting. Thanks for that.
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benld74 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Mar-18-11 02:36 PM
Response to Original message
42. Harry Blackwell Dresden - The Dresden Files - Jim Butcher
A magician private detective living in our world and fighting vampires, ghouls, zombies, were wolves, demons and whatever else is thrown his way. Funny, cant put it down kinds stuff
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themadstork Donating Member (797 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-19-11 10:33 PM
Response to Original message
43. James Orin Incandenza
Edited on Sat Mar-19-11 10:34 PM by themadstork
The Mad Stork himself. Such a bleak figure. It kills me every time he's convinced Hal doesn't speak. Madame Psychosis is also one of my favorites, if only for her call-out to the hideously and improbably deformed.

Others -

Hamlet - First character I ever loved, started my interest in lit.
Don Quixote - Inspirationally deranged! I wish I were brave enough to be as much a lunatic as he.
Milton's Satan - The ultimate badass. I have a hopeless man-crush on him.
The patriarch from Autumn of the Patriarch


Flavor-of-the-week: Molly Bloom. Oh rocks!


Edit - Gregory House also a huge favorite.
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-20-11 09:14 AM
Response to Reply #43
45. Wallace, David Foster - INFINITE JEST
Sounds very interesting...found two good links and am posting them:

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/w/david-foster-wallac... /


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infinite_Jest

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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-20-11 09:04 AM
Response to Original message
44. Flavia de Luce (Alan Bradley)
Flavia's an 11-year old afraid-of-nothing kid who solves mysteries. She's new to me....adult mysteries....

Link:

http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/B_Authors/Bradley_Ala...
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-31-11 11:02 PM
Response to Original message
46. Lisbeth Salander & Mikael Blomkvist
From The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson
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Kablooie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-12-11 02:40 AM
Response to Reply #46
55. Lisbeth Salander grabbed me. She quickly became my favorite.
Blomkvist not so much. He was OK but she was unique.

But I'm reading 1Q84 right now and Fuka-Eri is catching up with Lisbeth.
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WaitingforKarlRove Donating Member (19 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Apr-17-11 03:46 PM
Response to Original message
47. I named a cat after Atticus Finch
I think my second favorite would have to be Wolf from The Talisman by Stephen King and Peter Straub.
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TheCentepedeShoes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Apr-19-11 07:40 PM
Response to Original message
48. Doremus Jessup and
Lorinda Pike from It Can't Happen Here
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 11:06 PM
Response to Original message
49. Aloysuis Pendergast
I just met Detective Pendergast about 20 pages ago, reading a book called Relic by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. Found the authors' names on the Series List.

http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/C_Authors/Child_Linco...

Other than that my favorite character, Charlie Moon, isn't blond and from Alabama like Pendergast, and instead has black hair like most Indians (7' tall) and from Colorado, they are similar characters. Most people wouldn't seen the similarities, but I do, and I already love them both...

So glad to meet Det. Pendergast ;)
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Little Star Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-04-11 03:04 PM
Response to Original message
50. I've looked at this thread since it was first put up, it's too hard...
just picking one or two! I just could not pick one or two. Today I decided to make my self participate, lol.

I think I'll pick Johnsons Wyoming sheriff "Walt Longmire". Walt is an aging, likable, decent, rough around the edges, sometimes funny character. Walt, his best friend Standing bear and his deputy Vic (Victoria) had me from the very first page. Few books do that to me, I usually have to warm up to them a bit first. I will be re-reading these books for years to come.

For a much lighter read I adore Haines' Sarah Booth Delaney. She is a riot, as is her ghost (Jitty) and her best friend (Tinkie). As a matter of fact I love the whole town of Zinnia.

I'm also very sweet on Boxs Joe Pickett, Connellys Harry Bosch and Parkers Spencer.

There are many others I really like but I'm trying very hard to stick to just a couple.
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fadedrose Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-14-11 11:18 PM
Response to Original message
51. Det. Arthur Bryant ( Bryant and May Mysteries by Christopher Fowler)
About the Peculiar Crimes Unit of the London police.

Bryant & May are both in their 80's.. ;)
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YankeyMCC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-16-11 05:49 AM
Response to Original message
53. Lije Baley and R. Daneel
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Moe Shinola Donating Member (42 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-06-11 09:40 PM
Response to Original message
54. Repairman Jack and Jacopo Belbo
My 2 favorite characters are, I think,...


Repairman Jack is the hero of a series of novels by F. Paul Wilson, author of The Keep. Jack is available for hire
if you live in the New York City area, and have a problem you can't bring to the police. So you bring it to
Jack, and he "fixes" it for you. He only works for cash, has no social security number, and disdains any interaction
with official society. His adventures are in the category "crime meets weird" since he's always running afoul
of an alien "otherness" from beyond our reality, that wants to come in and take over. The book to start with is The Tomb.

Jacopo Belbo is an editor and researcher for a small press in Milano, called Garamonde Press. He and his friends Causabon
and Diatollevi, have become interested in the subject of the Knights Templar, and catch wind of a secret document
that may prove that the Templars never died out, but went underground, and are now in the final stages of a thousand-year-old
plan to take over the world. His story is told in Foucault's Pendulum, by Umberto Eco, which is a history course in
secret societies and conspiracies in much the same way as his Name Of The Rose was with the Catholic Church.
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ForeverFlashy Donating Member (25 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-19-11 01:09 AM
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56. Will from Ranger's Apprentice
I just love how the author developed the character, from an uncertain boy into a mature, responsible individual.
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