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Ohio Co. BOE approves fewer machines/warns that longer lines likely

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kuozzman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 10:24 AM
Original message
Ohio Co. BOE approves fewer machines/warns that longer lines likely
This dumbass ordered 3 machines per 200, not registered voters but voters who vote consistently, instead of the 4 per 200 they had on Nov. 2.

LISBON Co.- The county board of elections approved a set of "specifications" Friday to be used by the supplier of the computerized voting machines issued by the state. Director John Payne said the county has chosen Diebold as the supplier of the computerized voting machines.

The major change in the specifications will be a standard for a paper audit trail.

Voters will cast their ballots by operating a computerized touch screen. After the voter touches the screen and completes his choices, a piece of paper will print out. The voter will be responsible for reading the printout. He will then finalize the vote by touching the screen again. The printed copy then will enter a container that will prevent anyone from reviewing the vote.

Diebold also must create a system that cannot link the voter to the readout as they print out of the computer. This way, no one will be able to enter the container of printouts and attach the individual voter directly to the ballot that was just cast.

Payne said he has a few concerns with the touch-screen machines.
One is a longer wait in line for voters.
"It may take longer to vote which could create a problem. Look at the last presidential election," Payne said.

Well you still have 700 damn days until the next election! Why the hell don't you try to do something about those lines!?"

He said the state is using a formula of one unit to 200 regular voters in a precinct, not registered voters but voters who vote consistently.

This will mean approximately three voting machines for every precinct. Currently, there are an average of four booths in a precinct.

It also could take voters longer because the touch-screen system will include teaching some people to use a computer, and will require hand and eye coordination.

One of the pluses under the new computerized voting system will be that the visually impaired voter truly will be able to cast his own ballot for the first time.

Payne expects the machines will be ready for use in 2006, but that depends on how quickly vendors can comply with the standards set by the Secretary of State. Or in other words, how quickly vendors can comply with what will be the "official" results(percentages)requested by Blackwell. The machines then must be tested and certified by the federal and state governments before they are put out for general use.This will likely be easy

This whole "voter-verification" does not make it more reliable, does it? Big deal if the voter matches the "receipt" to the screen, then confirms what the screen says. On Nov. 2, wouldn't a persons brain have been the equivalent of the "receipt"? We still don't know how the computer records it! The "receipts" should be hand counted!

http://www.morningjournalnews.com/news/story/017202005_...

I just saw this story too, which is pretty interesting......
Jo Ann Davidson, the former speaker of the Ohio House who led President Bush's re-election campaign in a handful of crucial states, has been chosen to be the national Republican Party's second in command.

Davidson led Bush's campaign in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and West Virginia. As one of 11 regional leaders of the Bush-Cheney campaign, she is credited with helping Bush win Ohio, whose 20 electoral votes decided the presidential race.

Davidson, 77, served in the Ohio Statehouse for 20 years, including five as the first female House speaker. She left the Ohio House in 2000 because of an eight-year term limit approved by Ohio voters in 1992.

Davidson, of Reynoldsburg, Ohio, also has served as chairwoman of the Franklin County Republican Party central committee for 25 years and chairwoman of Ohio Gov. Bob Taft's 1998 and 2002 campaigns. She has led the Ohio presidential campaigns of Gerald Ford and Bob Dole.

http://www.philly.com/mld/beaconjournal/10571820.htm?1c
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kitkat65 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 10:34 AM
Response to Original message
1. I see a problem with this already
Edited on Sat Jan-08-05 10:39 AM by kitkat65
"Voters will cast their ballots by operating a computerized touch screen. After the voter touches the screen and completes his choices, a piece of paper will print out. The voter will be responsible for reading the printout. He will then finalize the vote by touching the screen again. The printed copy then will enter a container that will prevent anyone from reviewing the vote."

Wouldn't a better system by to have the printout on a continuous roll of paper with a copy given to the voter. Each continuous roll of votes would have to be sealed and signed by the precinct official and witnessed by the poll workers.

I think it would be too easy to grab a few of those paper ballots out of the box and switch them. A continuous roll is much harder to switch out.

Please see my post regarding demanding BOE officials resign.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.ph...

Edited to add:
Please see my post regarding demanding BOE officials resign.
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IStriker Donating Member (408 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 10:40 AM
Response to Original message
2. The printed paper attached to the touch screen...
machine gives a method for a recount by hand. When PA first started to use touch screen, it took some people forever to vote (poll people scheduled days when people could go see, learn to use, etc.) and they had lots of people with instructions and available to help the first time they were used on an election day. The election people are NOT going to go back to hand counting votes on election night and they were probably not as reliable as a machine is anyway. People make the mistakes whether it's hands on or through installing software, etc.

They're stingy about how many machines they order because they are expensive and they are not going to spend taxpayer money (and get voted out of office) for having a dozen sitting idly by while 2 would have adequately done the job.
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pansypoo53219 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 11:16 AM
Response to Original message
3. wow
nice democracy you got there in ohio.
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kuozzman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 03:04 PM
Response to Original message
4. Kick
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