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BooScout Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Mar-19-09 03:26 PM
Original message
Citizenship?
Have any of ya'll gotten your citizenship in your adopted country? Any pitfalls or problems that I should know about? I am seriously considering getting my British Citizenship.
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RICEQUEEN Donating Member (2 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun May-24-09 03:18 PM
Response to Original message
1. --
you better get it while you can. there have been and will continue to be many changes to citizenship laws throughout the world. countries are becoming increasingly racist and xenophobic, making it more difficult and creating as many obstacles as they can for foreigners to get citizenship. i know i will get mine asap. by the way, who are you going to use as your referee.
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MrModerate Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-14-09 07:18 AM
Response to Original message
2. Thinking about it. Not eager to come back to the States, but haven't "adopted" . . .
My current country. It's pretty cool here (Australia) but also has its imperfections. I don't have to decide for several years, and can pretty easily get sponsored by my company (they'd love it -- they pay me less if my point of origin becomes local).
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whathehell Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-23-09 04:55 PM
Response to Original message
3. I've heard (from an Aussie) that "most Australians despise Americans"
Is that true?
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MrModerate Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Dec-02-09 12:45 AM
Response to Reply #3
4. Naah, that would be bullshit. Most Aussies I've run across . . .
Didn't like Bush very much (although their prime minister at the time was cut from the same cloth) but don't dislike yanks either singly or collectively. Many have vacationed in the US and would like to do so again.

The "special relationship" forged largely in WWII is still intact.
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mackerel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-02-10 01:09 AM
Response to Reply #4
5. My experience is most Aussie like Americans.
Our countries have many similarities. I maybe moving there in a year or two.
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davidpdx Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon May-23-11 03:00 AM
Response to Original message
6. The government in Korea recently changed the citizenship laws
to make it easier for foreigners to obtain full citizenship. I'm technically eligible, but the one thing holding me back is the language component.
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An American in Paris Donating Member (18 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-10-11 02:15 AM
Response to Original message
7. Well, anyone considering this wants to be very careful
Usually the procedures are so long that you've got plenty of time to consider all the repercussions.

In Germany, for example, you're required to abandon your birth nationality when you take German citizenship... No Americans I know in Germany have taken that rather drastic step.

Also the US State Department can strip you of your US nationality under certain circumstances. It used to be that if you applied for a foreign citizenship, you were de facto considered likely to abandon your American nationality, which -- needless to say -- the State Department frowned upon. They still don't encourage or really even want to hear about dual nationality.

But the law that allowed State to strip you of your US citizenship in that manner changed back in the late 80s as I recall. It used to be that YOU had to prove that your intent was not to relinquish your US citizenship. Now the burden of proof is on the State Department.

Nonetheless, there are several things you can do to demonstrate that you want to preserve your US citizenship, and it's probably wise to take the precaution: First, vote in US elections! Join and be active in American organizations overseas. If you have children, be sure you take care of all the necessary citizenship paperwork for them ASAP & get their US Social Security numbers. Be sure they learn English, get a US civic education and are registered to vote when they're of age.

You can also write a letter to the Embassy or Consulate explaining that you have been "offered the opportunity" (the law of your host country undoubtedly offers you the opportunity, so this is not false) to take XYZ nationality for ABC personal and/or professional reasons and that you have decided to accept... BUT that doing so should in no way be construed as an intent to abandon your US citizenship, to which you remain viscerally attached, having family, property, business interests, in the US, having been married there, having accomplished your early and higher education there, etc ... You get the picture.

It doesn't require a lawyer, but you might want to seek out assistance from an American organization or binational association. And speak to other American binationals (PLURAL) in the country.

Then send the letter to the Embassy by certified mail, keeping a copy for yourself. That way you're absolutely on file, if the State Department raises any red flags about your case later... Or if something happens in the country and they decide to make all binationals choose between your new local citizenship and your US citizenship... which is the faraway dream of the extreme right Front National in France.

Hope that helps,
AAIP

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mwaussie Donating Member (9 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-04-11 05:05 AM
Response to Original message
8. Yes
I'll be working on Germany citizenship. And I plan on renouncing my US citizenship once I get it.
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Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Sep-14-11 03:20 AM
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