Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

With only 57 students enrolled, Missouri Catholic school wont open this fall

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
Home » Discuss » Places » Missouri Donate to DU
 
pstokely Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 03:32 AM
Original message
With only 57 students enrolled, Missouri Catholic school wont open this fall
Source: KC Star

The Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph announced today that after nearly 60 years of educating children in Jackson County, Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School is closing.

Dan Peters, superintendent of diocesan schools, said enrollment at the Raytown school had dwindled over the last few years.

Only 57 students registered for the upcoming academic year at the school, which serves children in kindergarten through eighth grade. A decade ago, 199 students were enrolled.




Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2011/08/09/3067148/with-only-...
Refresh | 0 Recommendations Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
JDPriestly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 04:04 AM
Response to Original message
1. Nobody can afford Catholic schools any more.
Just as well. Nothing wrong with Catholic schools except that they result in religious segregation in society.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Demit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 04:42 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Describe what you mean by religious segregation in society. I'm curious.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
JDPriestly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 05:31 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. Dividing kids by religion results in religious segregation.
When I was a child, I went to a public school since my parents were Protestants.

Down the street from my school there was a Catholic school -- same block. Apparently the Catholic kids started and finished the school day at a different time than we public school kids did. In addition, they sometimes had holidays that we didn't have. I was always curious about who in the world went to that school. Even our Catholic neighbors went to public school. I never met a one of them -- although they went to school on the same block that I did.

That made me very curious about the Catholic kids, but it also made me feel very separate from them. So I don't think it is good to have children separated, attending different schools according to their religion.

My children went to school in Austria for a few years. We are Unitarians -- always have been, so we didn't put down a religious preference when we started them in school in Austria. Religious education was a part of the school curriculum, so the children were assigned to classes according to their religion. One of my children was assigned to the Catholic class and the other to the Protestant class.

I will never forget walking my children to school one day and hearing a student, apparently from the Catholic class yelling out "The Protestant girls are *(^*&." It was really awful.

That's what I mean by segregating children by religion. It is as bad as racial segregation in my view.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Demit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 06:45 AM
Response to Reply #3
5. I went to Catholic school in the states, in a big city. When school let out, I went out & played
with my neighborhood friends, many of whom went to public schools and some of whom weren't Catholic. We organized ourselves by age, mostly, and sometimes gender depending on what the activity was. Later, in high school (I went to a Catholic high school as well), some of our Catholic friends went to public schools instead. Through them we met their school friends, many of whom weren't Catholic. We met various people through activities, like sports, and going to dances. We did not try to be, nor did we feel, segregated in society because of our religion. Additionally, my high school was an all-girls school (and later I went to a women-only college!), and my social life did not suffer because of that kind of segregation either.

Today, in some big cities, non-Catholics are sending their kids to Catholic schools, when the perception is that the public school system is bad, and the Catholic schools happily accept them. Perhaps it is different in small cities, and I don't know about Austria, but in my experience there is plenty of opportunity for children to mingle with people from other backgrounds, and they do.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Hangingon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 12:42 PM
Response to Reply #3
8. I went to catholic school too.
I played little league on a city league team. Went to the Y to swin and play basketball. Dated the girl from down the street - who went to public school. Played in a public youth golf league. Don't know how Catholic students could be such a mystery. I don't remember ever hearing a Catholic student taunt a public school student or vice-versa. Oh that was in Austria.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
JDPriestly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 02:46 PM
Response to Reply #8
9. Austria is a majority Catholic country.
At some points, the Protestants from a village I know well were deported to Siebenburgen.

Protestants were persecuted in various ways in Austria. It was pretty horrible. Protestant churches were not allowed to ring bells to call people to worship until sometime in the mid-19th century in Austria.

And so the separation of students according to their religion stems, in my opinion, from that original Catholic repression of Protestants.

Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Hangingon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 04:45 PM
Response to Reply #9
10. I see no precedent from Austrian history.
As opposed to the Austrian system, the American education system has not included separate religious education by demonination. It's that pesky church/state thing. As other responders have noted Catholic school students are well integrated in their communities. The rise of religious schools - historically Catholic schools and now increasingly protestant - stems from parents desires for a better education for their children. The historic Catholic repression of Protestants has nothing to do with it.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DesertFlower Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 05:39 AM
Response to Original message
4. i went to catholic school. so did most of
my friends. that was a very long time ago. i'm almost 70. my mom and my aunts and uncles and even my grandmother had attended that same school. didn't know any better.

a few kids in the neighborhood went to public school. there was no tuition back then. we were taught religion with a catechism -- didn't see a bible until i was 18 and stayed in a hotel.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
robcon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 06:48 AM
Response to Original message
6. Gee.. that hasn't happened anywhere else.
Edited on Wed Aug-10-11 06:49 AM by robcon
:sarcasm:

I would say that a significant number of Catholic schools have closed during the last 20 years... maybe 20% in the New York Metro area.

Cost.
Lack of religious fervor by Catholics.
Scandals about the clergy.
Whatever.
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
Smarmie Doofus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-10-11 06:59 AM
Response to Reply #6
7. Plus proliferation of "philanthropic" charter $chools as an alternative.
nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink | Reply | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Thu Jul 10th 2014, 06:11 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Places » Missouri Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC