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This MIchigan bottling law is taking some getting used to for me

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bluestateguy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 07:34 AM
Original message
This MIchigan bottling law is taking some getting used to for me
I got some sticker shock a few weeks ago when I bought a case of soda (I call it soda or soft drinks, not "pop") and the price was $8.40. Not knowing anything about the can and bottle law here, I did what I always do with old cans: crush them down with the expectation of going to the recycle center at some point down the road. Later I found out that they won't go through the machine if they are crushed, so that was money pissed down the drain. But lately I have been buying more juice in cartons. This will take some getting used to.
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notadmblnd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 07:48 AM
Response to Original message
1. I hate taking them back
I usually toss the empties in a big box in the kitechn closet and when it gets full, I find someone who'll take them back. Used to have a kid that would come around once a month that I would give them to, now I just try to find someone who needs some extra money. My box holds about $20.00 dollars worth of bottles when full.
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bluestateguy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 07:51 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. I'm not sure how I feel about the law
I guess it's a way of keeping sales and income taxes down. Perhaps the state figures that all of the rich people won't bother to take the bottles back, and that others will not be so vigilant about doing it because it's a pain.
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notadmblnd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 08:07 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. it helps keep the roads clean
used to be people would just toss their empties out the window of their car (some still do). I'm sure you'll see poor people around your area collecting them off the roads from time to time. I don't know where you are buying your soda, but I only buy it when it's on sale. Try Faygo brand pop, it's cheaper because it's made locally and they do have some good falvors. Lately I've been on a Red Pop Ice cream soda kick. Nothing like it.
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MichiganVote Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 05:40 PM
Response to Reply #2
7. Excuse me? This law has made a huge difference in the state.
Edited on Thu Aug-31-06 05:41 PM by MichiganVote
Before this law, cans were routinely tossed into our beautiful lakes, thrown by the road, or left in piles in our forests. This is a good recycling law and it should be nationwide. It has nothing to do with rich people or poor people. It has to do with lazy people who don't or won't clean up after themselves.

edit/typo
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Lefty48197 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Sep-02-06 09:20 AM
Response to Reply #2
13. The law was created to keep litter off of the highways
and it's a very effective law. Lately, the proliferation of other drinks sold in cans and bottles has jumped and the litter problem has started to return. We need to modify the law so that it doesn't just apply to carbonated beverages. Unfortunately, the food and beverage industry and their right wing cohorts have defeated attempts to include the newer drinks under out "bottle law".
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1gobluedem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 08:16 AM
Response to Original message
4. The bottle law has cut down substantially on litter
And kept plastic and glass out of landfills. Even people who don't recycle redeem their cans and bottles.

There has been some talk of redemption centers instead of taking them back to grocery stores, etc. but I don't think it's gotten very far.

My tip: keep everything separate; cans in one receptacle, plastic in another, etc. It makes cashing them in go much faster. And find a store where they regularly clean the machines; it's not so smelly and you're much less apt to have problems.

Sticker shock on the purchase end takes some getting used to but it's great to watch your order total drop after the cashier deducts your redemption slips!
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noonwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 10:37 AM
Response to Original message
5. What's weird is that it's only for pop and beer containers
Juice and water bottles are exemtpt.
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1gobluedem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 11:17 AM
Response to Reply #5
6. There is a push to include those now
But grocers (and Republicans) are resisting it. It began just for carbonated beverages; individual bottled juices, waters, and wine coolers didn't really exist then.
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Mich Otter Donating Member (887 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-31-06 08:19 PM
Response to Original message
8. The bottle deposit law is a needed law.
I get to Tennessee often, along the rivers, and I would not like to see Michigan become the kind of trash dump Tennessee is with all the cans and broken bottles strewn all over.
People are generally lazy. It takes some financial incentive to get the bottles and cans recycled.
I would like to see more of the beverage containers covered by the deposit law.
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livvy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-01-06 06:17 AM
Response to Original message
9. I hate taking them back also, but the intent of the law is good.
Mine tend to build up, no matter how many times I tell myself I'm going to take them back. Last spring I donated 3 garbage bags full to the local Girl Scout Troop. It cleared out my garage and I'm sure the troop was happy!
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1gobluedem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-01-06 08:38 AM
Response to Reply #9
10. Just make sure they're clean!
I used to work at a small corner grocery store and, trust me, nothing is more sickening than the stench of unwashed cans and bottles stored in a plastic bag -- not to mention the stickiness. Many stores won't accept them in plastic bags anymore.

I sort mine by brand and type and rinse them. Makes things a lot easier.
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KalicoKitty Donating Member (777 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-01-06 09:22 PM
Response to Reply #10
12. I always rinse beer cans and soda cans!
It is so disgusting to stand in sticky puddles and even the machines are grungy with spilt beer and pop!


:puke:
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LisaM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Sep-01-06 02:10 PM
Response to Original message
11. I live in Washington now and the roadsides are a mess
I can't understand why a progressive state such as this doesn't have a bottle bill. Cross the border into Oregon and it's instantly cleaner.
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