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Nobel winner: Hillary Clinton's 'silly' Irish peace claims

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ossman Donating Member (883 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-08-08 08:32 PM
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Nobel winner: Hillary Clinton's 'silly' Irish peace claims
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/20...

Hillary Clinton had no direct role in bringing peace to Northern Ireland and is a "wee bit silly" for exaggerating the part she played, according to Lord Trimble of Lisnagarvey, the Nobel Peace Prize winner and former First Minister of the province.

"I dont know there was much she did apart from accompanying Bill going around," he said. Her recent statements about being deeply involved were merely "the sort of thing people put in their canvassing leaflets" during elections. "She visited when things were happening, saw what was going on, she can certainly say it was part of her experience. I dont want to rain on the thing for her but being a cheerleader for something is slightly different from being a principal player."

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KittyWampus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-08-08 08:32 PM
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1. Hillary bringing peace to Ireland = Al Gore invented the internet. Except she really IS exaggerating
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Fredda Weinberg Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-08-08 09:11 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. Except that no one ... but Hil and Bill, know what led up to the effort n/t
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ossman Donating Member (883 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-08-08 09:27 PM
Response to Original message
3. k/r
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Az_lefty Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-08-08 09:33 PM
Response to Original message
4. hillary has all the class of a used car salesman...
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Hepburn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-09-08 08:49 AM
Response to Reply #4
13. Please....
...don't insult used car salesmen, OK? :hi:
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Medusa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-08-08 09:35 PM
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5. Wee Bit Silly? Please, let me translate.
That's code for "She's fucking ridiculous."
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PATRICK Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-09-08 08:30 AM
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6. Well that is the UK press
Does any candidate give a damn what some truth-teller says outside the MSM? The points are made for effect here. As RFK said about those criticizing his self exaggerated role in the Cuban Missile crisis, something to the effect that THEY are not running for president.

This is a legitmate point but hardly shocking and the Irish critic isn't going to have much effect on the American voter unless he has 20 mill to spend on US TV ads.
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NashVegas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-09-08 08:44 AM
Response to Reply #6
10. More Importantly, That's the Telegraph
Murdoch.
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Alamom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-09-08 08:31 AM
Response to Original message
7. John Hume. Nobel Peace Prize , Gandhi Peace Prize, Martin Luther King Award.
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Perky Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-09-08 08:33 AM
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8. I don't know how big a role you can play in a peace process if you don't have a security clearanc
Edited on Sun Mar-09-08 08:33 AM by Perky
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BootinUp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-09-08 08:39 AM
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9. Previous coverage from the Boston Globe
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2008/01/07/c... /

A similar anecdote does appear prominently, set in a different location and with another crucial difference - Clinton writes of her role as that of a supportive witness, not the key player who brought enemies together.

Indisputably, Clinton promoted peace in Northern Ireland during several trips there in the 1990s. Among those who followed the peace process, memories differ on whether her role was decisive. One activist from Northern Ireland recalls that Clinton did bring enemies together. A prominent journalist, however, doubts she could have brought foes together for the first time, as she describes.

More than an isolated stump speech snippet, her Northern Ireland story speaks to the larger issue of whether her travels around the world as first lady qualify as serious diplomacy. That experience is a crucial element of her argument that she is the most qualified presidential candidate, and it has drawn fire from her rivals.

"In those years in the White House I had a really extraordinary experience, because I was not only part of the domestic policy team and the diplomatic team we had in those years, but I was also able to help make some of those changes," Clinton said Saturday in Durham.

In that retelling, Clinton said she had hosted a meeting of enemies in the conflict. They had never been in the same room before, and "no one thought this was going to be a very good idea."

But then, a Catholic woman shared her daily fears that her husband wouldn't come home at night. Across the table, a Protestant woman described the same worry about her son.

"And for the first time they actually saw each other not as caricatures or stereotypes, but as human beings who actually had common experiences as mothers and wives and people," Clinton said. "One of the reasons why I'm running for president is to be constantly reaching out to try to bring people together to resolve conflicts and not let them fester and get worse."

In her book, Clinton describes hearing very similar sentiments from Protestant and Catholic women in Belfast in 1995. The difference: The women were already peace activists, not enemies who didn't recognize their shared humanity. "Because they were willing to work across the religious divide, they had found common ground," she wrote.

The story she told Saturday took place at Belfast's city hall, while the story in her book took place in a fish restaurant.

Her book does describe an event at Belfast City Hall on the same trip, a Christmas tree-lighting ceremony with President Clinton. Afterward, she said, leaders of the various factions stayed on separate sides of the room.

John O'Farrell, a former journalist from Northern Ireland who covered Clinton's visits there, said in a telephone interview that she promoted the involvement of women in politics and in the peace process, but he doubted that she had met with enemies who otherwise would not have spoken to each other. Rather, he said, she was working with people who were already promoting peace.

"Her heart was always in the right place, no one doubted that," said O'Farrell, who edited a magazine and did some freelance reporting for the Globe. "But the idea of her bringing together fiercely opposed combatants is a considerable exaggeration."

Asked about the differences between the account in Clinton's book and her description on the campaign trail, a Clinton spokesman referred a Globe reporter to two Northern Ireland activists who had worked with Clinton there. One of them, Monica McWilliams, a leading women's activist in Northern Ireland, said in a phone interview that she remembers Clinton on more than one occasion facilitating the kinds of discussions the senator has described on the campaign trail, although McWilliams did not recall any details of specific conversations.

"There would have been a lot of women who came together who would not have known each other," she said. "Hillary Clinton had an enormous influence on women in Northern Ireland. She was the real thing."

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NDambi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-09-08 08:46 AM
Response to Original message
11. Minor minor role
Hillary Clinton's Role in the Northern Ireland Peace Minor. Senator George Mitchell, the Clinton administration's leading northern Ireland peace negotiator, said Hillary was "not involved directly" in the diplomatic negotiations that led to the landmark April 1998 Good Friday agreement on power-sharing. She took an "intelligent interest" in the issues and got acquainted with many of the key players.
Processblog.washingtonpost.com
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Yossariant Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Mar-09-08 08:47 AM
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12. Nobel Laureate: Hillary's Irish Legacy

"I am quite surprised that anyone would suggest that Hillary Clinton did not perform important foreign policy work as first lady. I can state from firsthand experience that she played a positive role for over a decade in helping to bring peace to Northern Ireland," said former SDLP leader and Nobel laureate John Hume in a statement responding to critical press reports.

"She visited Northern Ireland, met with very many people and gave very decisive support to the peace process. In private she made countless calls and contacts, speaking to leaders and opinion makers on all sides, urging them to keep moving forward," said Hume.

"Anyone criticizing her foreign policy involvement should look at her very active and positive approach to Northern Ireland and speak with the people of Northern Ireland who have the highest regard for her and are very grateful for her very active support for our peace process," Hume concluded in his defense of Hillary's Irish legacy.
http://www.irishecho.com/newspaper/story.cfm?id=18626

John Hume is regarded as one of the most important figures in the modern political history of Northern Ireland and one of the architects of the Northern Ireland peace process there. He is also a recipient of the Gandhi Peace Prize and the Martin Luther King Award, the only recipient of the three major peace awards.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hume
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