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Overall, Clinton leads with 175 delegates, including superdelegates, followed by Obama with 75

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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 07:37 AM
Original message
Overall, Clinton leads with 175 delegates, including superdelegates, followed by Obama with 75
Edited on Fri Jan-04-08 07:45 AM by KoKo01
HUH? Does this paragraph make any sense? :shrug:

.................................
Obama, Huckabee sweep to Iowa victories

On the Democratic side, Barack Obama scored 38 percent of the vote with John Edwards second with 30 and Hillary Clinton third with 29. Obama won 16 delgates with Clinton getting 15 and Edwards 14. Overall, Clinton leads with 175 delegates, including superdelegates, followed by Obama with 75 and Edwards with 46.

For the Republicans, Huckabee won with 34 percent, with 25 percent for Mitt Romney, 13 percent each for Fred Thompson and John McCain, 10 percent for Ron Paul and 3 percent for Rudy Giuliani. Huckabee scored 30 delegates and Romney got 7.

After the caucuses, Democrats Joe Biden and Chris Dodd dropped out of the race.

Obama, 46 and a first-term senator from Illinois, told a raucous victory rally his triumph showed that in "big cities and small towns, you came together to say, 'We are one nation, we are one people and our time for change has come.'"

Huckabee celebrated his own victory over Mitt Romney and a crowded Republican field. "A new day is needed in American politics, just like a new day is needed in American government," the former Arkansas governor told cheering supporters. "It starts here, but it doesn't end here. It goes all the way through the other states and ends at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue."

Clinton, Obama and Edwards had all urged voters to consider them if their own candidate fell short. Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio publicly urged his backers to line up with Obama on a second round, and two Democrats said aides to Richardson did likewise as the caucuses unfolded in hopes of blocking the former first lady. Those two spoke on condition of anonymity, citing private discussions.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/caucus_rdp
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Colobo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 07:38 AM
Response to Original message
1. I don't think so.
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C_U_L8R Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 07:39 AM
Response to Original message
2. are they committed or can they switch?
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Yukari Yakumo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-05-08 02:22 AM
Response to Reply #2
12. I'm pretty sure the superdelegates can switch.
They at least must come to a decision at the convention.
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Freddie Stubbs Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 07:40 AM
Response to Original message
3. I think that the delegate selection process may be similar to the Electoral College
A candidate may wind up with slightly more delegates than a another candidate who received slightly more votes.
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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 07:47 AM
Response to Reply #3
5. I thought Caucus was different, though. That the delegates weren't chosen in advance but after
caucus. Anyway it seems an odd thing for Hillary to end up with so many Delegates when she came in third. Somehow it doesn't seem like the way it should be... :shrug:
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Mass Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 07:41 AM
Response to Original message
4. Superdelegates are uncommitted. They will change as the wind turns in a direction or another.
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Gman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 08:00 AM
Response to Original message
6. I don't believe the Richardson stuff about blocking Hillary
Richardson is very close with the Clintons. To try to block Hillary goes against what Richardson wants, the VP slot. The ticket in the fall will be Hillary/Richardson. I think these "aides" to Richardson are probably not aides but field people that don't know what the game plan is.
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luckyleftyme2 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 08:15 AM
Response to Reply #6
7. don't overlook the game plan

what we all want is a democrat in the white house; and as many of these candidates we can get in the new administration. we have the best field of candidates in years so push your candidate but don't dishonor others!
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sinkingfeeling Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 08:35 AM
Response to Original message
8. I think Yahoo is confused. These are state delegates.
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KoKo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-04-08 08:44 AM
Response to Reply #8
9. Maybe the 175 Delegates committed to Hillary include others outside the state...article is odd..
in that it doesn't really source the info ...just says DesMoines, IOW as the source. I don't think Iowa would have that many Delegates.
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MaineDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-05-08 07:49 AM
Response to Reply #9
14. That's my thought
It includes pledged Delegates won in Iowa and the super delegates from other states supporting her.
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Ytzak Donating Member (287 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-05-08 02:02 AM
Response to Original message
10. 2,025 delegates re needed to win.
796 are super delegates that can vote as they choose. The rest are chosen by the primaries, but those can change if there is not nominee with sufficient number of delegates to win.
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sandnsea Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-05-08 02:04 AM
Response to Original message
11. It's called the Clinton Machine
And the media writing whatever she wants, even if it intentionally confuses readers.
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Yukari Yakumo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-05-08 02:26 AM
Response to Original message
13. As for para 1, no
The correct count should be 17 for Obama and 14 each for Edwards and Clinton.

SuperDelegates can switch at any time and only need to make a decision when it is time for the convention.
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