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Should out-of-state students vote/caucus in a state where they don't live?

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MethuenProgressive Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:27 PM
Original message
Poll question: Should out-of-state students vote/caucus in a state where they don't live?
Edited on Fri Dec-14-07 02:27 PM by MethuenProgressive
If a student doesn't qualify for in-state tuition or even have an Iowa driver's license - should they caucus in Iowa instead of voting back in their home state?

Sorry, polls are turned off at Level 3.

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MadBadger Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:29 PM
Response to Original message
1. What do you mean where they dont live? Dont they live there for over 8 months of the year?
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MethuenProgressive Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:34 PM
Response to Reply #1
7. Do they qualify for in-state tuition? Have Iowa drivers licenses?
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eyesroll Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:30 PM
Response to Original message
2. Not this crap again.
If the caucus was 2 weeks later, nobody would be bitching because students have caucused at school for years. This year, because they'd have to come back early from vacation, everyone is up in arms. (In fact, I suspect some people are up in arms because it's a caucus, not a vote, and somehow that's sacred.)

Yes, students should have the right to vote or caucus where they attend school. They do have that right already. This has been litigated and settled.
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cali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:30 PM
Response to Original message
3. I don't know why I voted in your offensive push poll
but yes, students should vote where they live. And if they go to school 8 months of the year in Iowa or any other state, they have every right to vote there. Hell, I voted where I went to college, and that was a long time ago.

Give it up. Even Hillary has.
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MaineDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-15-07 06:23 AM
Response to Reply #3
21. I agree with you
Edited on Sat Dec-15-07 06:24 AM by MaineDem
Why did I vote?

This is a Republican issue. We should be in support of getting students to vote - wherever they choose.

This actually sickens me. Here in Maine there's a GOP effort to squelch the college students' vote. It horrible to read the same talking points here at DU.

And why stop at out-of-state students? Those who live in-state should vote where their parents live, if we are to carry this out to the fullest. Disgusting!
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Selatius Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:31 PM
Response to Original message
4. The Supreme Court said yes that out-of-state students can vote. I side with the court.
The fact is out-of-state students also hold jobs, rent apartments, and contribute money to the local economy. It is unfair that they should not also have a voice in what happens, especially in a nationally significant issue such as the Iowa Caucuses.
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napi21 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:31 PM
Response to Original message
5. An Iowan who is a student at an out of Staqte school is still an
Iowa resident! My son is a resident of Georgia, even though he's in the military as LIVES in Italy! He can still vote in the Georgia elections via absentee ballot!
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rucky Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:33 PM
Response to Original message
6. If you're there 3/4 of the year..
and you sleep there, and get your mail there, and have a bank account there

YOU LIVE THERE

this is a non-issue.
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bunnies Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:34 PM
Response to Original message
8. Why cant we put this to bed?
Its legal. They *should* if they want to.
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MonkeyFunk Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:35 PM
Response to Original message
9. students should vote wherever they want to vote
whether that's the town in which they attend college, or the town in which their parents live.
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redqueen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:37 PM
Response to Reply #9
12. I agree with you.
It should be up to them... requiring them to do extra travel to vote isn't exactly helpful.
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FrenchieCat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:35 PM
Response to Original message
10. We need as many young people wanting to vote as possible....
That's what is important.

Everything else is bullshit!
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MadBadger Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:37 PM
Response to Original message
11. Looks like your crookedly worded poll will bite you in the ass.
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Lucinda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:38 PM
Response to Original message
13. As long as they only vote once, I don't care where they do it.
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mrreowwr_kittty Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:40 PM
Response to Original message
14. According to a SCOTUS decision they can so take your b.s poll
And stick it!
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stillcool Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 02:42 PM
Response to Original message
15. it's the law...
Edited on Fri Dec-14-07 02:45 PM by stillcool47

1971 The 26th amendment sets the minimum voting age at 18.
1972 In Dunn v. Blumstein, the Supreme Court declares that lengthy residence requirements for voting in state and local elections is unconstitutional and suggests that 30 days is an ample period.

1995 The Federal "Motor Voter Law" takes effect, making it easier to register to vote.


but what the hey...maybe we can bring back the good old days?

1855-Connecticut adopts the nation's first literacy test for voting. Massachusetts follows suit in 1857. The tests were implemented to discriminate against Irish-Catholic immigrants.

1889-Florida adopts a poll tax. Ten other southern states will implement poll taxes.

1890- Mississippi adopts a literacy test to keep African Americans from voting. Numerous other statesnot just in the southalso establish literacy tests. However, the tests also exclude many whites from voting. To get around this, states add grandfather clauses that allow those who could vote before 1870, or their descendants, to vote regardless of literacy or tax qualifications.

1915- Oklahoma was the last state to append a grandfather clause to its literacy requirement (1910). In Guinn v. United States the Supreme Court rules that the clause is in conflict with the 15th Amendment, thereby outlawing literacy tests for federal elections.

1920-The 19th Amendment guarantees women's suffrage.


1924- Indian Citizenship Act grants all Native Americans the rights of citizenship, including the right to vote in federal elections.

1944- The Supreme Court outlaws "white primaries" in Smith v. Allwright (Texas). In Texas, and other states, primaries were conducted by private associations, which, by definion, could exclude whomever they chose.
The Court declares the nomination process to be a public process bound by the terms of 15th Amendment.
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sinkingfeeling Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 03:04 PM
Response to Original message
16. It should be based on your primary residence. Where do claim your residence?
Take Dick Cheney, who lived, owned a home, paid real estate taxes, worked, and had a Texas drivers' license, but claimed he was a resident of Wyoming to get on the ticket with Bush.
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madrchsod Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 03:21 PM
Response to Original message
17. it`s time for this------->


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MethuenProgressive Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-14-07 06:46 PM
Response to Original message
18. 17 yes, 14 no.
I'm surprised it is this close, actually.
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MethuenProgressive Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-15-07 06:05 AM
Response to Original message
19. 20 Yes 15 No
Sat AM kick
:kick:
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last_texas_dem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-15-07 06:13 AM
Response to Original message
20. Yes
I'm not sure why the in-state tuition or driver's license points are relevant. If the students meet Iowa's residency requirements for being able to vote in the state, they should be allowed to participate in the caucus. As Democrats we're supposed to be in favor of people voting, right?
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