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Would a Clinton presidency end the 50 state strategy?

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eridani Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 04:23 AM
Original message
Would a Clinton presidency end the 50 state strategy?
If she sticks us with Carville or Begala as DNC chair, what do we do about it? If Dean isn't on board for another four years, who might we try to get to replace him?

http://www.alternet.org/stories/58978 /

Even here in western North Carolina, where Republicans have proliferated since the Civil War (when the woods were full of Union sympathizers rather than pro-lifers), Wilkes County -- Bible-thumping, economically slumping -- has stood out for its fire-and-brimstone conservatism. It's been a stiff challenge to find folks willing to run against the Republicans. Hell, it's been rare to hear anybody publicly admit to being a Democrat. "You've got a lot of people in this county who probably couldn't tell you if they've ever met one," Sloop says.

But in a scene playing out this year all across "red America," from these lush hills to the craggy outcroppings of the Mountain West, previously unfathomable crowds of Democrats are streaming up the steps of the old county courthouse, past bobbing blue balloons and Welcome Democrats! signs. They're hopping mad about the national state of things but simultaneously giddy with a new-found hope -- finally! -- for their party.

Inside, as the courtroom fills up, three symbols of the new spirit bustle around. There's trim old Clyde Ingle, a onetime Hubert Humphrey campaigner who "finally just got tired of sitting up there in Deep Gap and complaining." Ingle and his wife, Eva, have spent the past couple of years cajoling shy Wilkes County Democrats to "come out of the closet," get organized and active.

Then there's Mark Hufford, a young, towheaded bundle of energy who's been helping Democrats win breakthrough elections as a field organizer. And there's white-haired, wisecracking "Uncle Bob" Johnston, who retired to Wilkes from upstate New York and promptly found himself being talked into the party chairmanship. "You've got to be in trouble when you're asking an 80-year-old Yankee to run things," he quips.

<snip>

The single oddest thing about the fifty-state strategy is surely the adjective often attached to it: "controversial."

Just how, exactly, could there be controversy over a national political party organizing nationally -- especially after years of pissing billions into an ever-shrinking "target" slice of the country, ceding wider and wider chunks of territory and disdaining the grassroots while Republicans built a powerful army of ground troops?

The DNC's fifty-state project is relatively inexpensive, compared with the costs of the thirty-second TV ad blitzes the party has increasingly relied on to target voters in Ohio and Florida. Salaries for the state parties run to about $8 million annually, considerably less than 10 percent of the DNC's budget and downright humble compared with what the GOP and its affiliates spend for similar party work.

In just two years, the belated catch-up effort has paid off in at least two tangible ways: It has exponentially multiplied grassroots party involvement and -- in a short-term benefit not even envisioned by its architects -- has helped win an impressive number of state, local and Congressional elections in majority-Republican regions.

<snip>

The real fear is that a second Clinton presidency would mean a return to the Washington-centric ways of the first -- to party control by "the very people who ground down the activist base in the 1990s and have continued to hold the party's grassroots in utter contempt," as Markos Moulitsas of Daily Kos wrote in the Washington Post. The harshest public critics of Dean's strategy are also among Hillary Clinton's most trusted advisers: Emanuel, Carville, Begala.

As Thomas Edsall reported in The New Republic last year, many top Clintonites so loathe and mistrust Dean that their campaign is "laying the groundwork to circumvent the DNC." There is talk of Clinton's team keeping its own field staff with the campaign after winning the primaries, rather than shifting them under the auspices of the DNC for the general election, as has been standard practice. "The DNC is going to be peripheral" if Hillary wins the nomination, one Clinton aide said. Clinton acolyte Harold Ickes Jr. has raised millions for a private voter database, to avoid relying on the DNC's.
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loveangelc Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 04:26 AM
Response to Original message
1. .
she better not stick us with carville and begalla as dnc chair is all i have to say. doesnt dean still have to be there for a while...?
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eridani Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 05:01 AM
Response to Reply #1
5. He's in until February 2009
I've heard he's not planning to run for DNC chair again, but that might change.
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yellowcanine Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 04:38 AM
Response to Original message
2. Well I'm not sure I agree with a 50 state strategy. I would definately write off Idaho and Utah.
http://surveyusa.com/50State2006/Approval50StateBushApp...

Any states that still had Bush at 55% approval in November 2006 are probably not worth any effort on the part of Democrats.
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eridani Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 05:00 AM
Response to Reply #2
4. With their small populations, they don't get a large share of the money
I would sure hate to see the hopes raised in NC Democrats dashed, though.
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yellowcanine Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 05:17 AM
Response to Reply #4
6. NC is going blue - if not in 2008, by 2012. As is Virginia, Florida, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado
and probably Texas (by 2012). It's the Hispanic vote that will cinch it. The Republicans have jumped the shark with the Hispanic vote by their immigration rhetoric.
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bluestateguy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 04:39 AM
Response to Original message
3. Would she put Terry McCauliffe back into his old job?
That guy fucked up everything he touched. Oh, except for his Global Crossing stock.
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AtomicKitten Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 10:26 AM
Response to Reply #3
17. He made the party solvent after decades of debt ...
and brought it into the hi-tech age for maximum efficiency.

McAullife gave Howard Dean a solid foundation to begin his own work fine-tuning the party machine.

There is a mile between what McAullife actually accomplished and "fuck(ing) up everything he touched," contrary to DU lore.






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Donnachaidh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 05:36 AM
Response to Original message
7. oh no.. not Carville
the thought of that really turns my stomach. :puke:
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wyldwolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 05:55 AM
Response to Original message
8. ya know, this article is just fear mongering
For example - are Emanuel, Carville, Begala REALLY Hillary's most trusted advisors? I've seen nothing that on that. In fact, Emanuel has refused to endorse Clinton because he's friends with Obama.

Further, where are Emanuel, Carville, Begala in that pic of Hillary's closest advisors? You know - the one that contained ALL WOMEN that made news headlines several months back?


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NavyDavy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 06:02 AM
Response to Reply #8
9. more divide the dem camp tactic
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eridani Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 07:12 AM
Response to Reply #8
11. What's the reason for wasting money on a separate voterfile?
Can't think of any reason why someone who wanted to build the party would not use the DNC voterfile.
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MaineDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 07:16 AM
Response to Reply #11
12. That bothers me too
I wish she had not gone with the other folks.
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wyldwolf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 07:23 AM
Response to Reply #11
13. who knows? But how does that equate to ending the 50 State Strategy?
Edited on Fri Aug-17-07 07:55 AM by wyldwolf
That's what the author of this piece - and by extension those buying into - should answer.
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eridani Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 04:11 PM
Response to Reply #13
19. I think that the author was implying the answer
Clinton just wants her own personal power base, and has no interest whatsoever in building the Democratic Party.
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MaineDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 07:02 AM
Response to Original message
10. I've been told she's assured the state chairs that she will support it
Time will tell.
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MannyGoldstein Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 07:23 AM
Response to Original message
14. Good Riddance!
I'm assured by Mrs. Clinton's camp that our poor performance in the 2004 elections was due to Dean's "Rumsfeldian" incompetence. If the DNC had only used the strategies employed by its DLC leaders from the 1994 to the 2002 elections to hold and increase our dominance of Congress, we would not have lost both houses to the Republicans in 2004.

(Yes, :sarcasm: of course)
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Totally Committed Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 08:51 AM
Response to Original message
15. I believe, sincerely, it is one of the things it is DESIGNED to do.
The DLC wants the old ways back. "Clinton acolyte Harold Ickes Jr. has raised millions for a private voter database, to avoid relying on the DNC's." Trust me... he's not the only one.

And, if she is NOT the nominee, look for the DLC to try and do everything in their power to make the nominee lose, even if it means leaving him/her twisting in the wind.

TC



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trayted Donating Member (250 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 09:27 AM
Response to Original message
16. There would not be a Clinton presidency. A Clinton nomination would destroy 2008 for Dems
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ieoeja Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Aug-17-07 11:04 AM
Response to Original message
18. No
Edited on Fri Aug-17-07 11:06 AM by ieoeja
Contrary to what DUers keep saying, a Democratic president does NOT appoint the head of the DNC. To the best of my knowledge, no nominee by a sitting Democratic president has ever been defeated, but the DNC has no rule guaranteeing that selection.

Given that the last President Clinton nominee ignored a large segment of the DNC, that the DLC worked very hard to defeat Howard Dean in 2005 and failed, I would be very surprised if the DNC hands control of the party to that particular group again.

And judging by the last paragraph in the OP, the Clinton team realizes this as well. According to that paragraph they are talking about working outside the party apparatus as much as possible. If this report is accurate (always a big if) then they appear to be worried that even after winning the primary, the party will continue its own way.

As anti-DLC as I am, if HRC wins the primary, I do hope she and the DNC do not repeat the embarassing actions of Dole and the RNC in '96 when Dole publicly presented a proposed platform that the RNC publicly rejected. Like it or not, she will need to negotiate with the chairman and other officials of the DNC.

On the other hand, phoning in her acceptance of the nomination because she doesn't want to appear on stage with those "leftist radicals" in the DNC would certainly make for a novel campaign tactic!


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