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Bush_Eats_Beef Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:02 AM
Original message
Bush Radio: "Ultimately, the best way to create jobs for Americans is..."
Relations between the United States and India have never been better. One important aspect of this partnership is working together to meet the energy needs of our growing economies, especially through the use of clean and safe nuclear power. On my trip, the United States and India reached an historic agreement to share civilian nuclear technology as India brings its civilian nuclear programs under the safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency. This agreement is good for American security because it will bring India's civilian nuclear program into the international nonproliferation mainstream.

The agreement also is good for the American economy. The agreement will help meet India's surging energy needs, and that will lessen India's growing demand for other energy supplies and help restrain energy prices for American consumers.

Another important aspect of this partnership is the growing trade between our two countries. In the past 10 years, India has passed economic reforms that have opened its door to trade and helped raised the living standards for millions of its people. In my meetings with Prime Minister Singh, I made clear that trade between our countries must be free and fair. I know that America's workers can compete with anyone, any time, anywhere so long as the rules are fair.

Ultimately, the best way to create jobs for Americans is to expand markets for American products. Today, India is one of the fastest-growing export markets. India has now a growing middle class that is estimated at 300 million people -- more than the entire population of the United States. Middle class Indians are buying home appliances from American companies like Whirlpool. Younger Indians are enjoying McCurry meals from McDonald's. And Air India has recently ordered 68 planes from Boeing. Last year, exports to India grew by more than 30 percent. And all this trade is creating jobs and opportunity in America. So we will continue to work to level the playing field for our workers, farmers, and businesses -- and deliver a better life for all Americans.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2006/03/2006030...



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Mythsaje Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:03 AM
Response to Original message
1. Either they're clueless
or they want US to remain clueless.

If you take away our manufacturing capabilities, we'll be at a disadvantage on so many levels it isn't funny.
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mhr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:07 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Read Thom Hartmann - It's Already Too Late
See below - % of US industries that are Foreign Owned today!

Foreign companies are buying up our water systems, our power generating systems, our mines, and our few remaining factories. All because "flat world" so-called "free trade" policies have turned us from a nation of wealthy producers into a nation of indebted consumers, leaving the world awash in dollars that are most easily used to buy off big chunks of America. As www.economyincrisis.com notes, US Government statistics indicate the following percentages of foreign ownership of American industry:

Sound recording industries - 97%
Commodity contracts dealing and brokerage - 79%
Motion picture and sound recording industries - 75%
Metal ore mining - 65%
Motion picture and video industries - 64%
Wineries and distilleries - 64%
Database, directory, and other publishers - 63%
Book publishers - 63%
Cement, concrete, lime, and gypsum product - 62%
Engine, turbine and power transmission equipment - 57%
Rubber product - 53%
Nonmetallic mineral product manufacturing - 53%
Plastics and rubber products manufacturing - 52%
Plastics product - 51%
Other insurance related activities - 51%
Boiler, tank, and shipping container - 50%
Glass and glass product - 48%
Coal mining - 48%
Sugar and confectionery product - 48%
Nonmetallic mineral mining and quarrying - 47%
Advertising and related services - 41%
Pharmaceutical and medicine - 40%
Clay, refractory, and other nonmetallic mineral products - 40%
Securities brokerage - 38%
Other general purpose machinery - 37%
Audio and video equipment mfg and reproducing magnetic and optical media - 36%
Support activities for mining - 36%
Soap, cleaning compound, and toilet preparation - 32%
Chemical manufacturing - 30%
Industrial machinery - 30%
Securities, commodity contracts, and other financial investments and related activities - 30%
Other food - 29%
Motor vehicles and parts - 29%
Machinery manufacturing - 28%
Other electrical equipment and component - 28%
Securities and commodity exchanges and other financial investment activities - 27%
Architectural, engineering, and related services - 26%
Credit card issuing and other consumer credit - 26%
Petroleum refineries (including integrated) - 25%
Navigational, measuring, electromedical, and control instruments - 25%
Petroleum and coal products manufacturing - 25%
Transportation equipment manufacturing - 25%
Commercial and service industry machinery - 25%
Basic chemical - 24%
Investment banking and securities dealing - 24%
Semiconductor and other electronic component - 23%
Paint, coating, and adhesive - 22%
Printing and related support activities - 21%
Chemical product and preparation - 20%
Iron, steel mills, and steel products - 20%
Agriculture, construction, and mining machinery - 20%
Publishing industries - 20%
Medical equipment and supplies - 20%

Thus it shouldn't surprise us that the cons have sold off our ports as well, and will defend it to the bitter end. They truly believe that a "New World Order" with multinational corporations in charge instead of sovereign governments will be the answer to the problem of world instability. And therefore they must do away with quaint things like unions, a healthy middle class, and, ultimately, democracy.

Snip ......

http://www.commondreams.org/views06/0227-20.htm
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ixion Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:08 AM
Response to Original message
3. 'Murikan products brought to you buy companies like:
Raytheon, McDonnel Douglas, Boeing, Lockheed Martin et. al. :grr:
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Rose Siding Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:08 AM
Response to Original message
4. Oh, but he thinks he's cute, doesn't he?
The WH is harvesting new hires from the Heritage Foundation resumes again- "...helped raised the living standards"
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Arkansas Granny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:16 AM
Response to Reply #4
9. While the number of families slipping into poverty in the U.S.
Edited on Sat Mar-04-06 10:17 AM by Arkansas Granny
is rising.

He has confirmed it - he IS as dumb as he looks.
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Itchinjim Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:13 AM
Response to Original message
5. Gotta love this:
Edited on Sat Mar-04-06 10:16 AM by Itchinjim
"I know that America's workers can compete with anyone, any time, anywhere so long as the rules are fair. "
Hey Dumbfuck, the rules aren't fair. That's the whole point of corporations relocating jobs overseas.

(edit for spellun)
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Webster Green Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:14 AM
Response to Original message
6. But, ....it's products we should be exporting, not jobs....
I think that's how it supposed to work. :P
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tenshi816 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:14 AM
Response to Original message
7. Bullshit as usual.
Edited on Sat Mar-04-06 10:15 AM by tenshi816
Younger Indians are enjoying McCurry meals from McDonald's.

How is that going to help the American people? Oh, wait, I guess now there will be a mass exodus of American citizens wanting to be fast-food workers in India.

Middle class Indians are buying home appliances from American companies like Whirlpool.

That might help a little if those Whirlpool appliances were actually being made in America. Again, sounds like this is only going to benefit the Whirlpool corporation, not American workers.

Bullshit, bullshit, bullshit. Every word that comes out of that man's mouth is pure bullshit.



Edited for typo
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Bush_Eats_Beef Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:30 AM
Response to Reply #7
12. The emphasis of the entire selection is India's growth, not ours...
...yes, India's growth is a good thing...for India.

The continued outsourcing of American jobs and Bush's insistence this week that he "will not allow protectionist policies" in the U.S. to prevent a FURTHER and GREATER mass exodus is a good thing...for India.

At some point I find myself losing interest in India's success story and think about people raising families, working two or more jobs, and losing their homes...right here, in the country that Bush is being paid to "lead."

:grr:
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tenshi816 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 12:09 PM
Response to Reply #12
19. Exactly!!!
I'm astonished (although I don't know why) that the Preznit is trying to make the loss of American jobs to another country seem like a good thing for the American people. Good for American corporations, yes, but how's that helping Joe and Jane Sixpack?
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salin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:16 AM
Response to Original message
8. boy does he make his harvard mba look good
:eyes:
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sinkingfeeling Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:18 AM
Response to Original message
10. Gee, the only American products that the world wants are arms and
military planes. Guess everyone in the US should be making those.
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liberal N proud Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:25 AM
Response to Original message
11. The king winks and his queen acknowledges
:puke:


What are we going to export to India? We have already outsourced all our work to them, there soon will be nothing left here.
I was so mad yesterday, my manager suggested that we outsource our design work to India during a resource meeting.

What do these assholes think is going to happen here?
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Bush_Eats_Beef Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:38 AM
Response to Reply #11
13. Speaking of design work, CNN had a video clip on their site last week...
...of an American CEO who has set up the entire base of operations for his design firm in India. He led the reporter on a tour and motioned to the Indian workers and said "In the United States, these people would be receiving a salary of $70,000 per year. Here? Ten, maybe twelve thousand"...followed by the kind of big grin that can only come when you have an office with 100 or so people in it and a discount of $60,000 per year on their salaries...

$60,000 x 100 = SIX MILLION DOLLARS A YEAR in wage "savings"...

Plus, I'm sure that these $10,000 / year people get NO benefits of ANY kind, so there are MORE "savings."

At the end of the clip he whined about how even with all of the wonderful cost savings, India...for him...has not yet reached the standard of "livable."

Translation: I've screwed the pooch, I've made my killing, I'm taking my marbles and going home and living like a frigging KING.

THIS is what Bush is boosting. THESE are the people who benefit most from outsourcing...not the freedom-lovin', McCurry-eatin' Indian workers.

:grr:
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liberal N proud Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:44 AM
Response to Reply #13
14. That sucks!
The manager that said that lives by bu$h, I was in his office and noticed that he had an 8x10 picture of bu$h on his desk where most of us would have a picture of our wives. I am sure he was following bu$h's lead on this.
What really sucked was the people who will most likely loose were sitting in the room at the time. They were in my office after meeting and it was not a pretty picture, they all know what is coming. I just couldn't believe the gaul of this moron saying that in font of the people who are going to suffer.
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Bush_Eats_Beef Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:53 AM
Response to Reply #14
16. That is exactly how Cisco Systems handled it back in 2001...
...I sat in many meetings similar to the one you described. The managers would hear the first few sentences describing an upcoming I.T. project and invariably would respond with "This sounds like a good project for our new offshore team."

Within a year of these "breakthroughs," Cisco did something they said they would never do. They laid off 8500 people (I was one of them).

I remember one department meeting, shortly after their major competitor Juniper Networks had laid off people. The director of my department who led the meeting was a worm, a backstabber, a slimy little two-faced cowardly excuse for a man. He led the department in catcalls and whistles over the people laid off at Juniper and I thought "these people are going to be terrified over where their next mortgage payment is coming from, what the FUCK is wrong with you? These people have KIDS, these people have RESPONSIBILITIES, and you're rubbing yourself over their misfortune?"

THEN he reassured the department that Cisco, unlike those losers over at Juniper, would NOT be having layoffs.

THEN the layoffs came.

This utter public relations CRAP about Cisco being "one of the best companies to work for?" Forget it. It's an unapologetic meat grinder.
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JDPriestly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 10:47 AM
Response to Original message
15. Profits for international corporations like McDonalds
don't mean profits for ordinary Americans. Don't be fooled by the American company name. How much money do I earn on the McDonalds hamburgers sold in India? Nada! Nichts! Nothing! Rien! Zilch! 0000000! How much tax revenue does the American government take in on the McDonalds hamburgers sold in India? Maybe some tax on the increased value of stocks or on dividends paid out to Americans who own McDonalds stocks, but that is a minuscule amount per hamburger -- probably too small to be calculated.

What American-made products can we realistically sell to India? Very few! Sales of nuclear technology are one-time deals. Once we have sold the equipment, the Indians can probably copy what we have sold them and make their own. Outside of that, we don't make products that people in India want and can afford to buy. The so-called "free-market" is too lopsided to be "free." We buy. They sell. We get impoverished. Somebody else gets rich.

Trading is like water. If you have two beakers, one empty and one full and you insert a tube halfway into each and allow the water to flow freely from one to the other, both beakers will soon be half full. In 1973 and before, we were the full beaker. Since Nixon and Reagan started the whole "free trade" movement, we have been steadily losing our water (our economic strength) and the so-called third world countries are becoming half-full. That might be OK, except we don't have any way to ensure that the loss of our economic strength is fairly shared by everyone in our country. A wealthy elite is holding onto its own, even increasing its value, while the rest of us, the vast majority of Americans, are getting thirstier and thirstier, poorer and poorer.

When we trade with India, China, etc. we increase the standards of living of the people in those countries and we lower the standard of living in our country. That's the way I see it. If I have four apples and I give my friend two of them, I only have two apples left. I'm poorer. My friend is richer. And that is the end of it. Now, if I sell my friend the two apples and take the money and plant an orchard and next year my friend buys ten apples from me, then eventually I can make money and my friend gets more applies and everyone benefits. The problem with the "free trade" concept as it is being implemented is that Americans are doing all the apple buying but no planting and selling. The people in other countries are taking our money and planting orchards in their countries. But they aren't buying our apples and we don't have the money or aren't spending the money we have to plant orchards in our own country that produce apples that people in other countries can afford. If you think I'm wrong about this, just look at the balance of trade figures for the U.S.

"Free trade" can't work for Americans because we can't maintain our living standard on the wages that can be made producing products that the third world will and can buy. No U.S. company can pay decent wages and still make products cheap enough to sell on the international market. Educating Americans is irrelevant. Educated Americans are making relatively less money than they did 30 years ago (I'm measuring income in terms of the quality of goods and living standard you can buy with it). The "jobs of the 21st century" line is a red herring. Swapping burgers for Chinese take-out is never going to pay well, and most of the jobs being created are either swapping food or health care. You can't export those services. You can't get Indians to pay for the nursing care of Americans. Face it, folks. "Free trade" is just a way to impoverish ordinary Americans and make us into serfs. We have to end the "free trade" mania.

Re education: Many, many of the people losing their jobs are beyond the age at which re-educating for a new job makes sense economically. Sending a 55 year old back to school to get a two-year or four-year technical degree or training makes no sense. Once the 55-year has retrained, he has to work some years to get the on-the-job experience to become efficient. Trust me, I've been there. It makes no sense to borrow money to go back to school if you are over 50. You have to make an enormous salary to pay back the student loans. And generally employers won't hire older workers for good jobs. Education sounds like a good solution but it isn't. It's just sucker promises, a con game to win the trust of and distract the American people while big business picks our pockets and steals our pensions. Lies, lies and more lies. That's all we are getting.
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darkmaestro019 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 11:06 AM
Response to Reply #15
17. (APPLAUSE)
How I wish I could recommend things.

"Education sounds like a good solution but it isn't. It's just sucker promises, a con game to win the trust of and distract the American people while big business picks our pockets and steals our pensions. Lies, lies and more lies. That's all we are getting."

EXACTLY EXACTLY EXACTLY
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area51 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-04-06 12:03 PM
Response to Reply #15
18. Well said.
I'd like to stick your well-written piece in the face of every traitorous American who is pro-offshoring/inshoring.

Bush said:
"India has now a growing middle class ...."

Yeah, & what he's leaving out is (1) it's at the expense of fewer American jobs, and (2), our middle class is shrinking. :mad: :nuke:


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