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Is there still time for a 'Saturday Night Massacre' and what would happen

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Spinzonner Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 01:56 AM
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Is there still time for a 'Saturday Night Massacre' and what would happen

afterward ?

WOuld the current Republican Congress have the integrity to follow through with a political punishment - impeachment ?
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Wapsie B Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 02:09 AM
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1. Key word there, integrity.
The brand of republican that controls the party these days admits to nothing even when caught red-handed. Sure some are distancing themselves but for the gop to stand up and do what is right for this country is asking more than they could deliver. To impeach * the repugs would have to admit that a terrible mistake was made. I'm not taking any bets on that one.
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longship Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 02:18 AM
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2. One scenerio
It's been mentioned too many times here recently to not mention in this context--pardons.

A constitutional expert friend of mine tells me that the Presidential Pardon is "unlimited". In other words, * could in effect pardon anybody and everybody if he wished and it would be basically constitutional.

However, he said that presidential pardons are not at all popular. If * used it to quash an investigation into his own White House, people wouldn't like it. Congress critters would see it as an abuse of power. There would be impeachment proceedings fairly quickly.

In today's political climate, I would have to agree with my friend. The GOP is in not in the same shape as it was six months ago. Moderates very well might bolt and side with the Dems.

In effect, that would be a Saturday Night Massacre for Chimpy. It's not something we want to happen. There's no telling what would happen.

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global1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 06:56 AM
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3. In The Aftermath of Watergate, Nixon Resigned and Many of ....
the top players served time in jail. Now those that are still around are radio/tv show hosts, authors and sages.

As I recall Nixon resigned because if he didn't he would be impeached. He was forced to do this by his Repug counterparts.

It seems to me that Plamegate could play out the same way.

Who will be our Gerald Ford though?
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longship Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 01:30 PM
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5. Nixon did not resign because of impeachment.
Edited on Wed Oct-19-05 01:30 PM by longship
Impeachment was looming. There was no doubt that the House would impeach. Nixon was adament--no resignation. It was off the table.

Then, Barry Goldwater and a couple of other Repub senators visited him in the Oval Office and gave him the bad news. There were not enough votes in the senate for him to escape removal from office. This triggered Nixon's change of mind, and his resignation. I remember the grim news coverage of Goldwater and company going to the WH. Although the topic of resignation had been broached previously, it was this event which broke the dam on the topic.

Before the senatorial visit, Nixon had every intention to ride out impeachment and let his future be decided by the senate. Nixon resigned because that was hopeless.
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No Exit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-19-05 08:50 AM
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4. "Gonzales Fires Fitzgerald"
Wouldn't it be a kick if Alberto Gonzales, at Bush's behest, of course, fired Mr. Fitzgerald?

In Louisiana, back in the 50's, they had this governor named Earl K. Long (Huey's brother). He was committed (while still governor) to the state mental hospital at Mandeville, LA. He fired the head of the hospital and replaced him with a crony who ordered Earl released.

Given his apparent odd neurological disorder(s) and disconnect from reality, I could see something similar happening to Junior.
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