Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Conservation Group Estimates Java Will Have 10,000 Hectares Of Rainforest Left By Year-End

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Environment/Energy Donate to DU
 
hatrack Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-25-10 12:27 PM
Original message
Conservation Group Estimates Java Will Have 10,000 Hectares Of Rainforest Left By Year-End
From 2003-2006, Java lost approximately 2,500 hectares a year (10,000 hectares of forest in total) according to the Forestry Ministry. Despite the rate of loss being far lower in Java than other Indonesian islands (such as Borneo, Sumatra, and Sulawesi), Java is particularly threatened because there is so little forest left. If the past rate of deforestation occurs from 2007-2010 then by the end of the year conservation organization Pro Fauna predicts only 10,000 hectares of rainforest will remain on the island, leaving a number of unique and endangered species in deep trouble.

In addition ProFauna campaign officer Radius Nursidi warns that the actual rate is probably higher than the official data reflects. Java is home to a number of species that survive no-where else, including the Critically Endangered Javan rhino with a populated estimated at 40-60 individuals; the Endangered Javan Hawk-Eagle; the Endangered Javan gibbon; the Vulnerable Javan langur; the Endangered Javan slow loris; and the Endangered surili, a species of monkey. The island has already lost one of its flagship species to deforestation and poaching: the Javan tiger likely vanished entirely in the 1980s.

Poaching remains rife in Java, according to Pro Fauna, even in national parks, such as the R. Soerjo Grand Forest Park in Pasuruan and Merubetiri National Park in Banyuwangi. Illegal logging is also a problem at these conservation areas. Currently, there are no security posts at the exit areas of these parks, allowing poachers to easily escape with their quarry.

" Indonesian government should take practical and political actions to save the remaining forests and wildlife in Java Island. The authorities should set up security posts in the exit points of the nature conservation areas," said Nursidi in a press release.

EDIT

http://news.mongabay.com/2010/01240hance_java.html
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
n2doc Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-25-10 01:33 PM
Response to Original message
1. They should put up big posters of Haiti
Because that is where they are going. A poor, treeless, eroded island stripped of anything renewable. Sickening.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Javaman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-25-10 01:45 PM
Response to Original message
2. Javaman is not happy. nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Fri Apr 18th 2014, 04:57 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Topic Forums » Environment/Energy Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC