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Nature - Greenland Sheet Could Melt Much More Quickly Than Expected, Paleo Data Show - AFP

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hatrack Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 09:06 AM
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Nature - Greenland Sheet Could Melt Much More Quickly Than Expected, Paleo Data Show - AFP
PARIS (AFP) The Greenland icesheet responded to global warming over the past 10,000 years more quickly than thought, according to a study released Wednesday. As a result, a medium-sized temperature increase this century could cause the continent-sized ice block to start melting at an alarming rate, it suggests.

"It is entirely possible that a future temperature increase of a few degrees Celsius in Greenland will result in a icesheet mass loss and contribution to sea level rise larger than previously projected," it warns. Greenland contains enough water to raise sea levels by about seven metres (23 feet). Even a far more modest increase would put major coastal cities under water and force hundreds of millions of people out of their homes.

Until recently, experts were confident that the planet's two icesheets -- in Greenland and Antarctica -- would remain largely stable over the coming centuries despite global warming. But more recent studies have cast doubt on this, showing the pace at which glaciers are sliding off from both icesheets into the oceans has picked up over recent decades.

The new paper, published in the British journal Nature, uses a new technique for measuring changes in the icesheet over the last 10,000 years that resolves a paradox. Earlier measurements suggested that parts of Greenland had somehow defied a trend of general warming in the northern hemisphere during a 3,000 year period that started some 9,000 years ago. The new research, led by Bo Vinther of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, demonstrates that the problem lay with how the the raw data had been interpreted.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20090917/sc_afp/climatewarm...
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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 09:26 AM
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1. .
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Bigmack Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Sep-17-09 10:48 AM
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2. Who needs
a thermohaline current anyway? I don't swim in the Atlantic, so colder water wouldn't bother me, and I live on a hill on the Pacific side of the continent, and would LOVE waterfront property! Or something. Ms Bigmack
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