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stephinrome Donating Member (494 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-24-09 04:14 AM
Original message
American Solar Energy Society Green Jobs Report - contact your elected officials
See below message from the American Solar Energy Society:

Friends of ASES,

We're all concerned about the economy these days, so I thought you might appreciate a little good news -- and to hear about a simple way you can help get the economy back on track.

This morning the American Solar Energy Society released the latest update of our groundbreaking study on green jobs.

It's posted at: http://www.ases.org/greenjobs

The ASES Green Collar Jobs report provides a sector-by-sector analysis of the green economy, the most detailed analysis yet. This report makes it easier to navigate the tremendous opportunities, and challenges, in the rapidly changing renewable energy and energy efficiency industries.

And the potential is huge.

This report forecasts up to 37 million jobs from the renewable energy and energy efficiency industries in the U.S. by 2030 -- but this will only happen with the necessary leadership, research, development, and public policy.

That's where you come it.

First, I hope you'll check out this report so you can see for yourself the huge opportunity in front of all of us.

But there's another important step to turn this information into action.

We need to ensure that every key policy-maker and elected official -- from the Obama Administration to your State leaders and even the City Council -- is aware of this new analysis and the important role that the green economy must play to get the economy back on track.

Can you please contact your elected officials to tell them about this report and urge them to make growing the green economy a priority this year?

Please let them know they can download this free report at: http://www.ases.org/greenjobs

This small step will go a long way to creating a sustainable energy economy. Thank you for your help.

Regards,

Brad Collins
Executive Director,
American Solar Energy Society

PS. You can find the names of your elected officials here.
PPS. The results of this report are powerful. Here are a few of the findings:

As many as 37 million jobs can be generated by the renewable energy and energy efficiency industries in the U.S. by 2030 -- more than 17% of all anticipated U.S. employment.

The renewable energy industry grew more than three times as fast as the U.S. economy in 2007 (not including hydropower). Renewable energy is also growing more rapidly than the energy efficiency industry, but the energy efficiency industry is currently much larger than the renewable energy industry.

Renewable energy and energy efficiency currently provide more than 9 million jobs and $1,045 billion in revenue in the U.S. (2007). The previous year (2006) renewable energy and energy efficiency represented 8.5 million jobs and $972 billion in revenue.

95% of the jobs are in private industry.

Hottest sectors include solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, biofuels, and fuel cells (in terms of revenue growth).

Hot job areas include electricians, mechanical engineers, welders, metal workers, construction managers, accountants, analysts, environmental scientists, and chemists. The vast majority of jobs created by the renewable energy and energy efficiency industries are in the same types of roles seen in other industries (accountants, factory workers, IT professionals, etc).

Renewable energy and energy efficiency can create millions of well-paying jobs, many of which are not subject to foreign outsourcing. These jobs are in two categories that every state is eager to attract -- college-educated professional workers (many with advanced degrees), and highly skilled technical workers.

Renewable energy and energy efficiency industries are already significant economic drivers in Colorado and are well-positioned for future growth. Colorado's efforts provide an important model for other states working to generate new jobs in the New Energy Economy. In 2007 RE/EE generated $10.3 billion in sales and provided over 91,000 jobs in Colorado, accounting for more than 4% of the gross state product. This could grow to as much as $61.5 billion and 613,000 jobs by 2030 with continued leadership, research, development, and policy efforts.

I invite you to read the report. And I hope you will help us get the economy back on track by contacting your elected officials to let them know about this report too. Thanks for your help.

The report is at: http://www.ases.org/greenjobs
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Nederland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-24-09 06:52 AM
Response to Original message
1. This can't possibly be right
As many as 37 million jobs can be generated by the renewable energy and energy efficiency industries in the U.S.

37 million jobs is nearly three times what the entire US manufacturing sector currently employs, and two and a half times what the entire US retail sector currently employs. I doubt very much that the renewable energy sector will represent that large a percentage of our economy.
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kristopher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-24-09 01:18 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. Where are their numbers wrong?
Edited on Sat Jan-24-09 01:24 PM by kristopher
Key conclusions from this report include:


Renewable energy and energy efficiency currently provide more than 9 million jobs and $1,045 billion in revenue in the U.S. (2007). The previous year (2006) renewable energy and energy efficiency represented 8.5 million jobs and $972 billion in revenue.

95% of the jobs are in private industry.

As many as 37 million jobs can be generated by the renewable energy and energy efficiency industries in the U.S. by 2030 more than 17% of all anticipated U.S. employment.

Hottest sectors include solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, biofuels, and fuel cells (in terms of revenue growth).

Hot job areas include electricians, mechanical engineers, welders, metal workers, construction managers, accountants, analysts, environmental scientists, and chemists. The vast majority of jobs created by the renewable energy and energy efficiency industries are in the same types of roles seen in other industries (accountants, factory workers, IT professionals, etc).

Renewable energy and energy efficiency can create millions of well-paying jobs, many of which are not subject to foreign outsourcing. These jobs are in two categories that every state is eager to attract college-educated professional workers (many with advanced degrees), and highly skilled technical workers.

The renewable energy industry grew more than three times as fast as the U.S. economy in 2007 (not including hydropower). Renewable energy is also growing more rapidly than the energy efficiency industry, but the energy efficiency industry is currently much larger than the renewable energy industry.


http://www.ases.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=a...

Edited to add: I just skimmed about 1/2 of the 200+ page report. It is an extremely comprehensive analysis; I wouldn't dismiss it without very good reason.
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Nederland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-26-09 01:11 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. I believe I was pretty clear
The number I call into question was the claim that "as many as 37 million jobs can be generated by the renewable energy and energy efficiency industries in the U.S. by 2030". As I clearly stated in my post, that would imply that by 2030 we would have more than 3 times the number of people that currently work in manufacturing or 2 1/2 times as many people that currently work in retail. Now I suppose it all depends on how you calculate the numbers. For example, what is meant by people that work in "energy efficiency"? Does every checkout clerk at Walmart count toward that number based upon the fact that Walmart sells CF bulbs? Start playing those kind of games and I guess you could get to 37 million pretty easily...
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kristopher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-26-09 10:31 AM
Response to Reply #3
4. That is as lame as it gets, friend.
Edited on Mon Jan-26-09 10:31 AM by kristopher
The report is at the link, yet you obviously didn't read it. Such speculative criticism may be warranted if the raw data weren't available but considering that it is, it's just the mark of a a worthless opinion.

In fact, the prediction very looks sound.
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Nederland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-26-09 12:03 PM
Response to Reply #4
5. I did read it
Edited on Mon Jan-26-09 12:04 PM by Nederland
For example, I read this part:

There is also the issue of how to take account of indirect job creation and how broadly or narrowly to define an indirect environmental job. For example, what of ancillary jobs created across the street from a factory producing solar collectors shortly after it opens, such as a doughnut shop, fast food restaurant, dry cleaner, etc. whose customers are primarily the workers at the renewable energy factory. Are these latter jobs also considered to be indirect green jobs or environmental jobs? We include such indirect jobs in the definition, although we also conclude they are not as green as the direct jobs created.

So there you have it. Employees of doughnut shops, fast food restaurants, and dry cleaners can be included as being "green jobs" in certain cases. Not exactly what I think of when it comes to green jobs, but at least now I understand how they came up with such a large number.
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kristopher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-26-09 12:22 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. You screw the pooch and the study at fault???
They CLEARY DEFINE AND DISCUSS THEIR TERMS UPFRONT. You didn't read the article and speculatively criticized it wrongly.

Since you read the 200 page report, please, share the number of DIRECT green jobs that they are talking about and explain again how insightful your initial critique was...

Please.
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Nederland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-26-09 02:39 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. I couldn't find it
Could you? I'd really like to know how big the direct number is.
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GliderGuider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-26-09 02:49 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. As far as I can tell, they don't break out the direct jobs.
So we're left with a tally that includes the doughnut shop waitresses. Then there's the little fact that their "moderate scenario" results in only half that many jobs as the "aggressive scenario" they tout.
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kristopher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-26-09 06:42 PM
Response to Reply #7
9. I'm still dwelling on your initial criticism.
Edited on Mon Jan-26-09 06:45 PM by kristopher
I haven't read the report carefully, it has a high information density and will take more than a brief look to digest. A large part of the effort is spent defining the nature of what is being measured; in other words they are setting out clear criteria that can be compared across various sectors that are competing for economic stimulation.

"As noted in Chapter II, the vast majority of the jobs created by RE are standard jobs for accountants, engineers, computer analysts, clerks, factory workers, truck drivers, mechanics, etc., and most of the persons employed in these jobs may not even realize that they owe their livelihood to renewable energy. This is illustrated in Table III-3, which lists the jobs created by renewable energy in the U.S. in 2006 within selected occupations. This table shows that in 2006 RE generated in the U.S.:

More jobs for shipping and receiving clerks (2,210) than for biochemists and biophysicists (1,580)

More jobs for carpenters (780) than for environmental engineers (630)

More jobs for truck drivers (9,500) than for forest and conservation workers (1,440)

More jobs for janitors (3,610) than for environmental science technicians (1,690)

More jobs for bookkeeping clerks (8,228) than for civil engineers (3,080)

More jobs for plumbers (4,670) than for mechanical engineers (1,950)

More jobs for electricians (6,330) than for computer software engineers (3,260)

More jobs for inspectors, testers, and sorters (2,400) than for HVAC mechanics and installers (2,130)

More jobs for security guards (1,310) than for surveyors (690)

Thus, many U.S workers are dependent on renewable energy for their employment, although they often would have no way of recognizing that connection unless it is brought to their attention."
(Pg 18, 19)

The total discussion is worth reading, but, to sum it up succinctly I think you could say that the method looks fairly at the number of total jobs created by spending in the EE/RE sectors. Their method does break out basic categories of "greenness" and that may be the flavor you are looking for.
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