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Almost 1/3 Of New Zealand's Beaches Have Bacteria Counts So High That Swimming Unsafe

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hatrack Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-08-08 01:38 PM
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Almost 1/3 Of New Zealand's Beaches Have Bacteria Counts So High That Swimming Unsafe
According to Consumer, almost a third of New Zealand's beaches have such high levels of bacteria that it is not safe to swim in them. In Auckland, the City of Sails, the situation is generally so bad that the council itself recommends people do not swim for 48 hours after heavy rainfall.

It may be the 21st century, but Auckland still cannot sort its storm water out. Tthe current city council, who could not find a single person to appear on Campbell Live, is cutting millions from its storm water improvement programme.

But it is not just Auckland beaches failing the cleanliness test. Some of our most famous beaches, Paihia in the far north and Waikanae in Gisborne, are potentially unhealthy too.

The appropriately named Summer Warr is an environmental scientist for the wellington regional council. From the first of November to the end of March, she is out sampling every swimming beach once a week.

EDIT

http://www.3news.co.nz/News/NationalNews/Beaches-unsafe...
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John Q. Citizen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-08-08 01:41 PM
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1. Their shit's fucked up!
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n2doc Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-08-08 02:29 PM
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2. never would have thought it
I would guess they rely heavily on septic systems?
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Dead_Parrot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-08-08 02:39 PM
Response to Reply #2
3. Just badly designed systems
From what I can gather, most of them date from the middle of the last century: Stick a heavy rainfall upstream and half the treatment works flood out.

Problem is, nobody wants to pay for upgrades - it's always somebody else's problem. The water supply chain is pushed to it's limit in a lot of places as well.

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