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Liberal_in_LA Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-03-09 09:55 AM
Original message
The library - a recession sanctuary
The library - a recession sanctuary

Obama's library lament to governors came in Philadelphia, where Mayor Michael Nutter says he must shutter 11 of 54 branches in cuts of "epic proportions." This is part of a silent tragedy. Library systems across the nation face cuts and closures at the very moment they have become recession sanctuaries.

Checkouts of books, CDs, and DVDs are up 15 percent at the main library in Modesto, Calif. In Boulder, Colo., circulation of job-hunting materials is up 14 percent. Usage of the Newark Public Library in New Jersey is up 17 percent. Library card requests have increased 27 percent in the last half of 2008 in San Francisco. The Boise Public Library reported a 61 percent increase in new library cards in 2008. In Brantley County, Georgia, library computer usage was up 26 percent in the last quarter.

"Some have said their computer at home was all torn up," Brantley library manager Kathy Moody told the Florida Times-Union. "Others have said they don't have Internet service or they had to drop their service."

http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/editorial_opinion/ope...
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alterfurz Donating Member (723 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-03-09 10:51 AM
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1. like the hippies used to say...
"Libraries will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no libraries"
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eleny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-03-09 12:10 PM
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2. The parking lot has been packed at our branch
It's been like this for about a year. I'm retired so I stop there during the day on weekdays. It used to be the wide open spaces but not any more.
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scholarsOrAcademics Donating Member (194 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-03-09 05:56 PM
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3. valuable private libraries

but, I've learned its difficult to loan books. That is if you expect them back without resorting to bounty hunters.
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Liberal_in_LA Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-03-09 07:27 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. really? People don't return them willingly?
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scholarsOrAcademics Donating Member (194 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-03-09 09:49 PM
Response to Reply #4
5. depends on how much risk
Edited on Sat Jan-03-09 09:54 PM by scholarsOrAcademics
one is willing to assume. Considerations would include how much one values the book being loaned, how much it could cost to replace it, estimates on whether one would ever want to reread it. I suppose there could be refinements of consideration as to what would complete it(personal library) for future inheritors. Its naive to assume one has the correct judgment of the person being loaned to; its unwise to assume one is not being too generous in judging that person has all their marbles.

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Danascot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-04-09 04:46 PM
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6. Related article FYI: More people using libraries in tough times
Across the country, in every kind of neighborhood and community, library use, by various measures, is up, said Jim Rettig, president of the American Library Association, which has 66,000 members and promotes libraries and librarianship. At this point, we have an entire population affected by the recession. People are discovering they can save money by using libraries, and they can develop their knowledge and seek employment.

Rettig said the 2 billion items checked out from U.S. libraries this year is 10 percent more than during the economic downturn in 2001. But books, DVDs and other material are only part of the story, he said.

In 73 percent of U.S. communities, the only place a person can get free Internet access is libraries, Rettig said. Libraries in areas hit hard by factory closings are playing an especially important role in the economic recovery. Most job applications are now submitted online.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/1...
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