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Proud liberal Kat Donating Member (217 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jun-21-05 09:26 PM
Original message
Question from someone with little economics/money knowledge
Ok I am definitely firmly on the progressive side of economic issues. I believe in a more progressive tax system. I believe in social spending programs. I believe that corporations are getting away with highway robbery. And more importantly I believe that a progressive economic system is the best for the health not only of the individuals who will benefit fro said social programs and progressive tax systems but to the vitality of our country.

Here is my problem, I have a lot of belief that I am right, but I really don't have a grasp of the nuts and bolts when it gets to the nitty gritty of debating economics. I understand why I feel the way I do, but I have a hard time putting forth why people who have a background in economics would agree. I know that there are people in the field or who have a good grasp who side with the progressive side, but boiling down their arguments is tough for me. Anyways to make a too long post shorter, I found www.faireconomy.org, which has some good short answers to questions I often debate that make it a little easier for me. Any other resources that are easy for someone who doesn't spend much time delving into the nitty gritty of economics to understand out there. I am trying to better educate myself on these issues so I can defend my position more articulately, but economics/money issues do not come naturally to me and I need to start simple LOL!

Thanks for any help you can give!
Kat
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politicaholic Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jun-21-05 09:31 PM
Response to Original message
1. There was a question somewhere?
Welcome to DU!

:hi:
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Proud liberal Kat Donating Member (217 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jun-21-05 09:46 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. Yes I do tend to babble!
Ok do you know any good resources for the economic mumbo-jumbo information challenged to access to become less challenged? Better?
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Warpy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-22-05 11:27 AM
Response to Reply #2
4. Well, 90% of any discipline is learning the vocabulary
so if you want to impress other economists, that's what you need to do.

Or you can be like me, and write posts in the spirit of the wisecrack from Voltaire, "Only a fool feels compelled to point out the obvious."

The problem is that schools of economics have all turned to elegant theories that tend to break down in the real world into all the ills of unregulated capitalism: concentration of wealth, impoverishment and exploitation of the workers, and monopolies. Fools may be just what it takes to puncture all the highly educated puffballs supported by the hot air of scholarly jargon.

It's certainly what will get through to people who vote.
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bananas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jun-21-05 10:59 PM
Response to Original message
3. Here are some links.
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IrishDemocrat Donating Member (163 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-22-05 01:23 PM
Response to Original message
5. Here's a few links
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supply-side_economics
http://www.taxpolicycenter.org

This will give you plenty of arguments to help put Reaganomics in the grave where it belongs. My favorite is one of the essentials to a democracy is a progressive tax structure.
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Robert Oak Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-22-05 02:22 PM
Response to Original message
6. our site
has a series of links and books listed on it, including tutorials.

in my sig., but here they are:

www.noslaves.com
http://forum.noslaves.com

For in-depth basic economics, you might pick up a Paul Samuelson
economics textbooks (I picked up an older edition for a buck).

I don't think I've found a specific in depth reference that shows
mixed economies (public spending, i.e. social programs plus
capitalism) are the best way to overall economic stability and growth,
but so far it sure is implied.

I wouldn't mind finding such a text that analyzing economic history from that viewpoint.
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Rapier2 Donating Member (52 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jul-03-05 09:39 AM
Response to Original message
7. notes
Start with JK Galbraith's 'Money'. Easy to read and fun.

Before there was economics there was money. Money is an abstraction and as time goes on it gets ever more abstract. At the same time itis integral to our very selfhood and dominates so many aspects of our lives that it is very hard to step back and see it for what it is. Progressives are famous for a certain distain for money and things financial. Thus ceding money to those who crave its accumulation.

Our money itself is created by government it close partnership with the banking and financial interests. Not surprisingly the purpose of the system is firstly to benefit themselves. Not mind you a grand conspiricy to explain all, but just a simple observation about the way the world always works.

Economics used to be called Political Economy before they decided to dress it up and sent it off on its own as a science, purportedly. The modern abstraction which is called money is the product of government and is to its very core political.

Economics as we know it is an ideology.

Someday in the distant or not so distant future this age will be looked back on as the age of Economics. People will shake their heads in wonder at the absured beliefs attributed to all encompassing power of markets.
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