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So, what culturally different foods have you tried (i.e. those that aren't part of your normal view)

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Godhumor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:29 PM
Original message
So, what culturally different foods have you tried (i.e. those that aren't part of your normal view)
On my honeymoon, my wife and I went to a famous restaurant in Osaka that specializes in "live" octopus dishes--in other words, the octopii were in an aquarium and alive. The way the restaurant worked, you ordered up to a certain number of dishes from a menu, the chef would then grab an octopus kill it and then serve the dishes.

Our first dish was octopus sashimi, or raw "meat" generally served with soy sauce (minus the rice bed that would make it sushi). Because of the quick trip between the aquarium and the knife, the tentacle pieces that were served were actually still mobile. The first piece I put in my mouth, the suckers grabbed my tongue and I could feel it crawling, for lack of a better word, in my mouth. It was definitely one of the more unusual culinary experiences I've had.

The rest of the dishes were delicious and more traditional in terms of how I rationalize food, but that first one still strikes me as being truly different.

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Brickbat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:32 PM
Response to Original message
1. Most of my travels have taken me to places with tastest similar to mine, and there are many things
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 04:33 PM by Brickbat
I refuse to eat. However, when Mr. Brickbat was in Russia the first time, he was served tongue with great ceremony, which would have been fine if the esophagus hadn't been attached.
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:13 PM
Response to Reply #1
15. GA-ROSS!
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sharp_stick Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:36 PM
Response to Original message
2. I ate roasted insects in Africa once
They were a large termite and didn't taste half bad if you could get over the really nasty texture.

I've also eaten and actually enjoyed rattlesnake and alligator in the past.
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Brickbat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:37 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. Hee, a science demonstration served dried insects (I can't remember if they were insects or actually
dried and seasoned worms) at a presentation at a community hall in a town of 200 in eastern Minnesota. I had forgotten about it until you said "I ate roasted insects in Africa," and I thought, hey, I ate insects, too -- but not in Africa. :rofl:
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RebelOne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:48 PM
Response to Reply #2
20. I have had fried grasshoppers before, but I didn't know what I was eating
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 05:48 PM by RebelOne
until I saw the label on the jar. I was told they were nuts. Yes, I have also had alligator many years ago at the Muskogee Indian reservation in South Florida. Sort of tasted like a cross of chicken and veal.
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TlalocW Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:14 PM
Response to Reply #2
25. I ate sauteed grasshoppers in Oaxaca, Mexico
I was taking my last Spanish class for a major through a program at my college where one of the professors takes you on a tour of Mexico and teaches whatever classes he needs to teach. He gave everyone a list of things to try to do in Mexico (if we could). Things like take a taxi somewhere and talk to the cab driver, attending a wedding or quinceanera (if you could - we stayed with host families), etc. We stayed in Mexico City for just under a week then went to Oaxaca. Apparently a lot of the farms down there don't use pesticides but trap grasshoppers which are then diced, seasoned, and sauteed and used as condiments and such on tacos. In a large market we went to, a girl had a large bowl of hopper parts and was offering free samples, and I was the only one who tried any. In the same mall we found a t-shirt with a very Americanized grasshopper on it (tennis shoes and fanny-pack - Oaxaca is home to a lot of Spanish language schools that attract Americans) that said (in Spanish), "I ate grasshoppers in Oaxaca, Mexico." The group bought that for me.

Later that day when we were all having dinner together, I hypothesized to my professor that the whole grasshopper thing was a ruse, a city/state-wide joke that the natives played on Americans where they send out one of their daughters to stand in the middle of a market and then make bets on the various American passersby to see if they'll partake.

I hold the same hypothesis about escargot in France. It's a national joke played on other countries, and all French people are taught from an early age basic sleight-of-hand so they can switch out candy/gummy snails for the real ones when eating escargot.

TlalocW
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a la izquierda Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:44 PM
Response to Reply #25
29. I had chapulinas too.
I thought they were pretty good. I drew the line there, however. And I don't eat meat anymore, so it's no longer an issue.
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PETRUS Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:37 PM
Response to Original message
3. Insects are the most extreme for me. nt
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Warren DeMontague Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:38 PM
Response to Original message
5. Used to be friends with a nice Thai lady
her 'authentic' dinner she made for us was really good, but the waterbugs were a bit much.

Still, I'm open minded about food.
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mike_c Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:42 PM
Response to Reply #5
7. I find those Thai belostomatids too medicinal tasting....
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 04:42 PM by mike_c
I'm an entomologist, so I've eaten lots of insects, LOL. Both intentionally and unintentionally. But like you, I don't like the giant Asian waterbugs-- they taste iodiny or otherwise medicinal to me, and if I'm gonna be picking chitin out of my teeth for an hour, I at least want a shrimp dinner to show for it!
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Withywindle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 11:46 PM
Response to Reply #5
46. Huh, I wonder if that's what I had.
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 11:47 PM by Withywindle
I went to Thailand with my mom a few years ago - she was teaching dance classes. Most of the time we had local friends of hers with us or other people who spoke a little English and could "guide" us or were in big cities or places used to tourists, but once we were alone and raving STARVING at an outdoor food vendors' market and we were the only non-Thais for miles.

We went up to a family selling bowls from huge vats of stew, and just pointed at the ones that smelled the best. Neither of us is vegetarian or has food allergies, so we didn't care what was in it as long as it was food. Everything we had was absolutely delicious, and we wolfed it all down with the knowledge that we'd probably go to our graves without ever knowing what we were eating in that moment.

No regrets. It really was yummy. Even if there were bugs in it.
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Cid_B Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:40 PM
Response to Original message
6. Bugs, Ethiopian food and anything I ate locally in Afghanistan...
Bugs - survival school - We got a two copperheads as well. A moral victory as there wasn't too much meat.

Ethiopian food - Local place in Germany - pretty good

Afghanistan - Never got sick but I know some folks who did. Food hygiene is out the window; along with all other forms of hygiene now that I think about it.
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GoCubsGo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:24 AM
Response to Reply #6
54. I've had bugs here...
It was at a science fair. An entomologist had a display on the uses of insects. He baked some meal worms into oatmeal cookies. They were quite tasty. They had a nutty flavor to them. I would eat them again...
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MiddleFingerMom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:43 PM
Response to Original message
8. When I was stationed in Germany for 4 years, I decided from the start that I could eat hamburgers...
.
.
.
... all my life... or I could open up and try new and interesting culinary experiences.
.
.
.
I'm so glad I chose the latter, not the least reason being that hamburgers in Germany
really, REALLY sucked at the time (before the great fastfood invasion that started
around 1976 or so, European beef was pretty substandard).
.
.
.
I don't think I could EVER eat eyeballs (I think I read Saudi Arabia) and, in the same,
um... sorry... vein, I don't think I could ever eat mountain oysters here in the States.
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.
Owwie.
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:15 PM
Response to Reply #8
17. My mother likes to tell of my great-uncle who always ate the eyeballs of a roasted sheep.
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 05:15 PM by WinkyDink
It was considered a great honor as well as delicacy.

Sicilian.
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aint_no_life_nowhere Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:09 PM
Response to Reply #8
23. You mean Rocky Mountain Oysters, aka bull testicles?
I couldn't bring myself to come within a mile of that.
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MiddleFingerMom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 09:07 PM
Response to Reply #23
39. "I couldn't bring myself to come within a mile of that."
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:yoiks:
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progressoid Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 09:14 PM
Response to Reply #23
41. Here in Iowa, we use Hog Testicles.
Yummm.
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BiggJawn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 10:45 PM
Response to Reply #23
44. love 'em.
Breaded, Fried, served hot with horseradish sauce.
NOMNOMNOMNOM
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 09:01 PM
Response to Reply #8
38. ...
}( :hi:

you REALLY need to get out here sometime. I'd fry some up for you.
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MiddleFingerMom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 09:09 PM
Response to Reply #38
40. Oh, yeah!!! Me, Dumbass and Lupe all fighting over the biggest share! ... ... ... Biggest PAIR?
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 09:13 PM by MiddleFingerMom
.
.
.
.
.
(on edit)
If I ever DO come out there, I'm PACKIN' all my vittles in.
.
.
.
I could just picture THAT Norman Rockwell setting.
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.
.
"So, MFM... did those enchiladas taste... :evilgrin: different to you?
.
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.
.
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Duer 157099 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:47 PM
Response to Original message
9. Sometimes those tentacles can choke a person to death
They swallow the tentacle but the suckers grasp the side of the throat making it impossible to swallow and the person can choke.

I don't think I'd ever risk eating a recently-dead octopus.
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dtexdem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:47 PM
Response to Original message
10. I liked canned octopus in Puerto Rico.
But unlike my son, I never got to eat armadillo in Mexico.
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nadinbrzezinski Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:50 PM
Response to Original message
11. Roasted ants in red chili paste
and maguey warms with lime in a tortilla.

Both were delicious.

Oh yes, rattlesnake stew... fishy.

And frog legs.

I like to try food.

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quinnox Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 04:54 PM
Response to Original message
12. Not much, but there is one exotic food I can guarantee no one has had
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 04:55 PM by quinnox
Golden poison frog. It has killed people who merely touch it. Its the most poisonous thing in the world.

I dare all those guys on tv who think they are macho and eat weird foods to try to eat that thing!

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ret5hd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:10 PM
Response to Reply #12
13. you know, that makes me think...
i've never seen any of those guys eat poison ivy either! or sulphuric acid! what a bunch of wusses.
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:13 PM
Response to Original message
14. North African. LOVE couscous with harissa!
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aint_no_life_nowhere Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:56 PM
Response to Reply #14
33. Coucous is wonderful
Did you eat it with the hot spicy sausages called "mergues", commonly made from donkey meat? No spicy couscous is complete without enjoying it with strong Algerian red wine called Sidi Brahim.
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taterguy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:15 PM
Response to Original message
16. Eastern Style barbecue
If you have to ask what that is, you're not from North Carolina.
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Bosonic Donating Member (774 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:17 PM
Response to Original message
18. Black pudding, Escargot, Steak Tartare
First two were tasty, last one was nasty.
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RebelOne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:50 PM
Response to Reply #18
21. Had escargot and steak tartare.
The escargot were nasty, but the steak tartare was very tasty. I wouldn't dream of eating either one now because I have been a vegetarian for the past 15 years.
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GoCubsGo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:27 AM
Response to Reply #18
58. I have not had black pudding, but I have had kiszka
Kiszka is Polish blood sausage. I was raised on the stuff, and I still crave it. How I wish I could get it here. The local British gift/grocery store has black pudding. I may have to try it one of these days. I have been wanting to, just to see if it's an acceptable substitute for kiszka.
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Xithras Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:22 PM
Response to Original message
19. Many. I love to travel, and always eat the local oddities.
You live once. Taste everything.

Obviously, I try to sample traditional local cuisine whenever I travel, and I've tried a number of great foods over the years. I've found, however, that you can have the most fun when you visit a strange place and ask for a local delicacy that even they consider weird. I've eaten quite a few bugs this way :)

My weirdest cultural food wasn't found traveling though, and it wasn't a bug. I had a Swedish friend at Berkeley who occasionally got "care packages" from home that contained some really weird Swedish kitsch. One day he whipped out a can of Surstroming, which is fermented, salted fish (9and is a bit of a seasonal delicacy over there, I guess). The rotting smell was nauseating, and the odor hung around our apartment for a week. I did try on bread, but to be honest I didn't get the appeal. :puke:
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AsahinaKimi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 05:59 PM
Response to Original message
22. Living here in San Francisco
We have nearly every ethnic cusine you could possibily imagine. It would take me years to try them all, but I mainly stick with the Asian dishes. I love everything from Chicken Adobo to Nasi Lemak.
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EFerrari Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:24 PM
Response to Reply #22
26. I was born in the 50s and lived an immigrant neighborhood of Daly City.
Anything but Swanson's, Chef-Bo-Ar_Dee and Campbells' was new to us.

lol

So, homemade tamales, hot & sour soup, beef bourginon, chicken cacciatori, red beans & rice, all new to me. :)

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Glassunion Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:13 PM
Response to Original message
24. I'm black and white... African(Ethiopian), Irish, German, Spanish and Asian(Russian/Mongolian)
For me to go outside my box I'd have to leave the planet.
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lapislzi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:41 PM
Response to Original message
27. I have a plan
I want to be able to visit any country in the world and know that I'll be able to find something tasty to eat (not Burger King). I've got most of Europe and Asia covered, some of Africa. There is no end to the kind of food I will try, although I'm a little squeamish about insects that aren't lobsters or shrimp.

Last night my husband and I visited the Afghan Kebab House. Superb! And inexpensive!
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Seedersandleechers Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:43 PM
Response to Original message
28. Haggis, black and white pudding.
Nasty tasting. But, at least I gave it a try.
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RebelOne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:46 PM
Response to Reply #28
30. I had haggis in Scotland. It was not too bad tasting.
Those were the days before I became a vegetarian and realized what was in it.
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msanthrope Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:52 PM
Response to Reply #30
32. I had haggis after having 5 Newkie Browns. It wasn't so bad....nt
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YellowRubberDuckie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 07:15 PM
Response to Reply #30
35. They make Vegetarian Haggis.
I just wonder what is in it. Craig Ferguson keeps one in his TARDIS.
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geardaddy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 10:34 AM
Response to Reply #28
50. I love haggis and black pudding.
White pudding not so much.
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zappaman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:47 PM
Response to Original message
31. A McRib
Still the worst thing I've ever tried to eat...
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bigwillq Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 07:55 PM
Response to Reply #31
37. HA!
:rofl:

That made me laugh.

Yea, it's nasty. I can't even stand the smell of it.
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YellowRubberDuckie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 07:10 PM
Response to Original message
34. You're brave.
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 07:16 PM by YellowRubberDuckie
I could never meet my food before I ate it. I'm too much of a big hearted sucker. :evilgrin:
I've tried Chicken curry made by a Bangladeshi friend, Japanese, Chinese, Italian, Mexican and British. I forgot Cajun!
Mexican is by far my favorite. It has the least squishy, least slimy food of them all. But Italian runs a close second.
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Odin2005 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 07:50 PM
Response to Original message
36. I've had octopus sashimi, too, but not from one killed right in front of me, LOL!
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frogmarch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 09:14 PM
Response to Original message
42. Well, when I was about 9,
my best friend and I spent a weekend at her grandparents farm, and for supper one night her grandma made soup. It had pinto beans in it, some cut up carrots and other vegetables, and hunks of beef some of which had hide with fur attached. I didnt eat the soup. I faked having a bad headache or something and went to bed.

I dont like trying new foods, unless the ingredients are familiar to me, and I like them. Im not a great one for trying exotic dishes, even if they dont have fur in them.

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BillyJack Donating Member (653 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 09:55 PM
Response to Original message
43. Pidgeon
http://www.metropolasia.com/Han_Lok_Yuen_Pigeon_Restaur...

Watched a customer of mine eat a HUGE bowl of pideon HEADS at this restaurant, back in the day. *CRUNCHY* I drank my beer ~ he crunched on the lil pidgeon heads. Their lil pigeon beaks were all open in a sort of "scream" sort of way.....
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GoCubsGo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:35 AM
Response to Reply #43
62. Ugh...the rest of the bird is probably quite tasty.
I've had mourning dove, which was quite good. Breasts, not head. They are closely related to pigeons, so they probably taste close to the same. I don't think I could do the heads.
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Arctic Dave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 11:26 PM
Response to Original message
45. Salmon roe straight out of the fish. Not bad.
Edited on Wed Nov-30-11 11:27 PM by Arctic Dave
Edit:

Forgot about muktuk. Yeah, won't do that again. Like eating crisco somthered on shoe leather.
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Godhumor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 10:03 AM
Response to Reply #45
48. Yeah, watched the muktuk preparation on Flying Wild Alaska and decided I couldn't do it
I'm very open to new foods but that just looked awful.
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Arctic Dave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 10:52 AM
Response to Reply #48
52. They have some things I won't even try.
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RebelOne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 12:15 PM
Response to Reply #45
64. I have eaten fish roe in the can. Not sure what kind of fish.
That was back in the '50s. I have not seen it since.
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HipChick Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 12:38 AM
Response to Original message
47. Dried Blood
Black Pudding
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NV Whino Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 10:26 AM
Response to Original message
49. Chicken feet
I ended up at a little restaurant out in the avenues in San Francisco one time. I think it was Vietnamese, but might have been Chinese. Nobody spoke much English, so it was simply point at the menu. Wasn't unpleasant tasting, but not much more than but crunchy bones.
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geardaddy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 10:39 AM
Response to Original message
51. Having lived in the PRC and Taiwan I've tried quite few things.
Chicken feet, pickled chicken intestines, sea cucumber (not my fave) some sort of sea worm thingies, duck feet, duck tongues, possibly dog somewhere in there, all variety of tiny mollusks, fish eyes, fish heads, etc.

But the weirdest thing was the pizza. Mayonnaise, peas, hot dogs and corn on a pizza? *shudder*
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:24 AM
Response to Reply #51
56. mmmmsea cucumbers
chunks of rubber in mud-flavored brown sauce mmmmmmm

the worst of that special dinner was some kind of "soup" that was shark oil with some slimy skin in it - oh god it was so awful

I had some funky pizza in Tokyo myself - some strange fish, not anchovy (which is probably worse to me) and yeah - strange veggies
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geardaddy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 12:10 PM
Response to Reply #56
63. Did you have that "pork fiber" in Tokyo
Pretty sweet and a little salty "dust" made from pork put on top of pastries? That took a little for me to get used to.
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suninvited Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:14 AM
Response to Original message
53. I ate a dried bug once
it was crunchy with a nutty taste. Supposedly full of protein. I forget the country of origin, but I don't really need to know, I won't be ordering any! Although not as disgusting as I imagined, it wasn't that tasty either.
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Denninmi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:24 AM
Response to Original message
55. Corn smut fungus aka huitlacoche
Edited on Thu Dec-01-11 11:29 AM by Denninmi
This fungus is the gray/white knobby looking thing that grows on stalks and ears of corn as a parasite. In Mexico, it is widely viewed as a delicacy.

I saw some for sale at $20 a lb at a local upscale gourmet produce market about 7-8 years ago, right in the peak of corn season here in Michigan. Being a gardener with my own patch of corn, I vowed to try it.

Well, it's absolutely delicious. Imagine the taste of fresh white button mushrooms sauteed with fresh sweet corn, and that is what huitlacoche tastes like. The appearance can be a bit "funky" -- dark black lumps by the time it's cooked. I generally treat it like any mushroom, dredge in seasoned flour and then saute in butter or butter mixed with oil. It makes a nice addition to the filling of Mexican dishes like enchiladas or tacos, but also is good in things like omelets or risotto.

Apparently, it's also good for you:


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/27/huitlacoche-co...
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:32 AM
Response to Reply #55
60. I've seen pictures and I agree it is pretty scary looking
also I'm not a huge fan of fungus anyway. It comes canned too and that really look unappetizing.
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Denninmi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 01:39 PM
Response to Reply #60
65. Yeah, that's the thing about it.
Tastes great. Looks kind of like a pile of woodchuck droppings. Talk about your disconnect.
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KamaAina Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:25 AM
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57. Dinuguan
a Filipino delicacy (?) also known as "chocolate meat".

Tip: If offered dinuguan by a Filipino coworker, do NOT put it in the microwave! It's made with blood, which has a tendency to spatter... :puke:

But hey, at least it's not balut! :scared:

More palatable exotic foods: lots of 'em. Hawai'i alone offers poi (it should be fresh; the bagged stuff gets too sour), purple Moloka'i sweet potatoes (served at the cafeteria of a local Japanese university with apples and cashews!!), marlin jerky (!!) and "wild meat" (boar from the mountains; make sure it's from a Neighbor Island as most of the pua'a on O'ahu have brucellosis). (h/t to opihimoimoi for the last two :hi: )
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Denninmi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:30 AM
Response to Reply #57
59. Yeah, I'll pass on the balut, thanks.
It makes me shudder to think of it. But to each their own.
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GoCubsGo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Dec-01-11 11:32 AM
Response to Reply #57
61. Balut makes me want to barf just thinking about it.
I have a relatively strong stomach, and I'm willing to try most exotic things, but I would have to be on the verge of starvation before I even considered eating balut. Moloka'i sweet potatoes, on the other hand, sound delicious! I have had poi, as well as salmon and tuna jerky, but not marlin jerky.
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