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dd2003 Donating Member (198 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 11:48 PM
Original message
Going on my first hunting trip
Edited on Tue Nov-08-11 11:49 PM by dd2003
I have never handled or shot a gun....Are there any forums, you tube clips, I can go to, learn background and safety... Then I plan on going to a gun store and talking to them too, learning from them, and purchasing a gun for my first trip as well as going to the shooting range. We will be hunting wild boar. This will be a gun for hunting only. We plan on eating almost every part of the boar. This animal will not be wasted. Any other advice would really be appreciated. Thanks
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 11:55 PM
Response to Original message
1. cross post your thread to:
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dd2003 Donating Member (198 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:00 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. must be a donor
Edited on Wed Nov-09-11 12:02 AM by dd2003
not a donor to du.... cant post in that area :(
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:09 AM
Response to Original message
3. why do you want to do this?
and you do know about the google, right?
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dd2003 Donating Member (198 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:11 AM
Response to Reply #3
4. I was hoping DU had experts to point me in the right direction
I have been using google as well... DU is a huge resource and I was hoping to tap into its expertise.
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:21 AM
Response to Reply #4
7. well there are some hunters here and a fair contingent of gun afficianados
but in general I wouldn't think a progressive board would be the best resource. Having said that and giving you the benefit of the doubt (I confess this seems just a little er...fishy for the reasons I just gave) I have some questions that would help me direct you for the help you are seeking.

You said you are going on a hunting trip, your first. When and where? With a guide, friends, alone? Again WHY are you doing this? I ask for a real reason. People hunt for a variety of reasons and knowing what yours are will help with getting you useful information.

Just how are you planning to handle the carcass? Do it yourself or hired out Have you ever eaten wild pig? (if not you may not want to start with boar)

Lots of questions or things to think about.
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dd2003 Donating Member (198 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:43 AM
Response to Reply #7
9. This is a retreat among very close friends
There are 7 of us going... 2 are very very experienced hunters. I am not as close with the 2 experienced hunters as the other 4. This is not a go and shoot em up and mount them type trip... We are more of the out there crowd who want to understand sustainable living, as in living off the land if shtf. I raise my own produce already. I understand many here have problems with taking of life of an animal. This is literally eat what you kill and if we can, use the other parts if possible. I have eaten wold boar multiple times... Wild boar sausage, wild boar shredded meat, and my personal favorite, wild boar bacon. I understand this is not the normal liberal characteristics, but I am not a normal liberal...
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:20 PM
Response to Reply #9
23. sorry I went to bed
some good advice here already

get a .22 and practice shooting first
I don't know where you are now but you might consider getting a varmit permit or whatever is required and try killing something small first. Some people find their first kill to be traumatic and never go further. A boar is a pretty serious and dangerous LARGE animal. To even think about attempting to hunt one with no experience seems a little off-base to me, especially if you haven't even handled a gun before. I suppose it could happen and there is the well-known phenomenon of beginners luck, but...

you didn't say when this event is so again it is kind of hard to offer advice in terms of what you might be able to do to prepare, but the best would be to have somebody local teach you what you need to know - others in the thread have given some good possibilities. A formal safety course is a good start, some practice shooting, some scouting of the area if it is nearby (although different areas have different rules about when you can be out)

I'll be honest - I don't think a first time shooter should be trying to shoot a wild hog. I'm not a hunter although I see plenty of them around here (birds, deer, javelina and some predator hunting), so my advice may not be as good as others with more experience. Good luck and do let us know what you do and how it goes.

FYI in Texas and other areas the locals tend to trap them and feed them a little corn for better meat. I don't know how sustainable or economical hunting/shooting them is. They are a serious pest and need control, that is for sure.
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SteveM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:45 PM
Response to Reply #7
64. A number of "progressives" on this board do hunt regularly...
and are involved with other conservation work. The better books about hunting I have in my library are written by "progressive"-leaning folks. Don't sell us so short!

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Angry Dragon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:16 AM
Response to Original message
5. You do know boars fight back...........
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:18 AM
Response to Original message
6. I've cross-posted for you at Outdoor Life forum:
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dd2003 Donating Member (198 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:32 AM
Response to Reply #6
8. cheers
thanks
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SteveM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:50 PM
Response to Reply #8
65. It is one's duty to hunt feral hogs!
There are a number of books about hunting in used book stores. Thumb through them, esp. those which deal with feral hog hunting. These books usually come with chapters recommending types of weapons, calibers, accessories, procedures, etc. You don't need to get talked into buying an expensive rifle, as new ones can now be had for well under $500. Hunting togs can often be picked up at used clothing stores; that's where most of mine came from, including U.S.-made coveralls, boots, etc. Similarly, you don't need to spend a lot on knives; Gerber makes good ones for under $35. Your buddy's old hack saw with a quality blade will serve as an inexpensive and effective bone saw.

Shooting ranges often have rent guns which you can try out. You can decide what action and make better without plunking down a lot of dough and regretting your choice later. For example, don't be talked into buying a magnum-caliber rifle; uncomfortable noise and recoil, and "too much rifle" for what you are hunting. Most deer rifles are quite suitable for hogs, though bullet construction may vary. Depending on where you live, you may wish to consider a stand: This can remove what dangers are involved in hog hunting, and you will be able to see your quarry from further off. Get at least a fairly good pair of binoculars; you can choose that nice fat sow well in advance and be ready!

See if your friends know farmers with a pig problem. The farmer may let you hunt his/her place, and suggest where the "organic backhoes" hang out. If you get one, offer the farmer a cleaned piece.

Good luck, be safe and have fun!
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krispos42 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 01:59 AM
Response to Original message
10. Wild boar?
Very tough animal.

The most recent issue of Guns&Ammo has an article about it, actually. Apparently they have a lot of cartilage and fat on their bodies. The former tend to make expanding bullets expand prematurely and thus not penetrate deeply, and the latter limits blood loss, making tracking a difficult and long-term process.

Pick it up or look for it on-line, if you want.


And some intro reading...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartridge_%28firearms%29

I would get a carbine-length (short and handy) rifle, either a lever-action or a semi-auto, and use ammunition that's rated for large, dangerous game. For example, a lever-action .44 Magnum from Marlin gives you 10 shots on tap. Also, a .44 Magnum fired from a rifle is about twice as powerful as one fired from Dirty Harry's revolver (longer barrel = more time for the gunpowder to push the bullet). Finally, you can get hard-cast (non-expanding) bullets for it, and ammo is generally easy to come by. This would limit you to maybe 100 yards, because you're really firing a handgun cartridge and it's not very aerodynamic, but that should be more than enough if you're hunting in the woods or brush.

You can also hunt with a regular deer rifle, but keep in mind that bolt-action rifles are longer, a bit slower to operate, and usually only hold 5 rounds. But pretty much any cartridge that is commonly used for deer is also available with heavy, hard-hitting bullets. Rifle bullets tend to be long and thin, designed to cut cleanly through the air and move much faster than handgun bullets for long-distance shooting. Handgun bullets tend to be short and fat, to put the most weight and make the biggest wound at close proximity.


BUT FIRST...


Get yourself a .22 LR rimfire rifle similar to what you'd like to buy to hunt with. Use this rifle to practice shooting... sight alignment, trigger pull, operation of the mechanism, mounting and dismounting the rifle, breathing, etc. You can buy 500 rounds of .22 for the price of 20 rifle cartridges... it will pay for itself fairly quickly. .22 ammo runs maybe 4 to 5 a shot for the bulk stuff, but a box of decent .30-caliber will run a buck each or more.





What you need to know:

In America, bullets are weighed in "grains", which used to be used for pharmaceuticals until it went all metric. There are 7,000 grains in a pound, and thus 437.5 grains in an ounce. So you'll see people taking about, say 150-grain bullets.

The "chambering" of a gun defines the ammunition it fires. It defines all the dimensions and angles of the cartridge, as well as the pressures it operates under. It is critically important that you ONLY shoot ammunition that matches what your gun is designed for. If you gun is stamped ".30-06", use ONLY .30-06 in it. Using anything else can result in serious injury and even death.

There is an assortment of standard bullet diameters that pretty much everybody uses. What determines how fast the bullet moves from the barrel is the cartridge that the bullet is fitted in, as the cartridge type determines how much gunpowder can be used to make the gun go bang.

For example, a bullet from a .300 Remington Magnum will fly faster than the same bullet from a .308 Winchester. Faster means a) more muzzle energy, and b) flatter flight path.

Common rifle-bullet diameters:

.224", commonly labeled as .223, 5.56mm, or .22. Popular cartridges: .223 Remington, 5.56mm NATO, 5.56x45mm, .22-250.

.257", commonly labeled as .257 or .25. Popular cartridges: .25-06, .257 Roberts

.277", commonly labeled as .270. Popular cartridges: .270 Winchester, .270 Winchester Short Magnum

7.2mm, commonly labeled as 7mm or .280. Popular cartridges: 7mm Remington Magnum, 7mm-'08, .280 Remington, 7x57mm

.308", commonly labeled .30, .300, .308, or 7.62mm. Popular cartridges: .30-06, 7.62x51mm NATO, .308 Winchester, 7.62mm NATO, .30-30 Winchester.

There are of course larger cartridges, but most of the market for rifles is between .22 and .30 caliber. Some other ones that would be good for boar-busting are the .338 Winchester Magnum and the .35 Whelen.



Note: Confusingly, the number can refer to either the barrel diameter or the bullet diameter. The bullet is slightly larger than the barrel, so it forms a tight seal that does not let the propellent gasses escape. But a barrel that is .300 inches across fires .308" bullets, regardless of whether it's all a .30, a .300, a .308, or a 7.62mm.




Within a bullet size, some cartridges are more available and/or have more options. If you're looking around in the .30-caliber world you can get bullets that weigh very little and expand rapidly that are intended for things like coyotes, mid-weight/medium expansion bullets for things like deer, and heavy bullets with little or no expansion for things like bear and wild boar.

If you get a rifle that shoots .30-06 ammunition, you'll face a bewildering array of ammo in all shapes, sizes, weights, etc. If you get rifle in, say, .300 Savage your ammo selection will be limited.
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Iggo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 08:33 AM
Response to Original message
11. Try to not shoot your friends.
Edited on Wed Nov-09-11 08:33 AM by Iggo
I think the boars'll be safe.

:P
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HopeHoops Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 08:56 AM
Response to Original message
12. "Shhhh. Be vewy vewy qwiet. I'm huntin sqwewy wabbits."
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NightWatcher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:00 AM
Response to Original message
13. please dont do this. You should NEVER "learn" gun handling from youtube
stay back at the campsite and whittle with a plastic knife


I really hope this is a joke OP
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:00 AM
Response to Original message
14.  One simple item. Do not go out alone. Pair up with a more experienced hunter
they will be able to teach you some basic safety habits, and be there as a back up if you miss and the pig turns on you.

Oneshooter
Armed and Livin in Texas
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MrsBrady Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:04 AM
Response to Original message
15. I would think you would need to know how to handle
a gun long before you go hunting for while boar.
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aikoaiko Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:15 AM
Response to Original message
16. Check your state's Dept of Natural Resources web site and regulations


Your DNR may have basic hunter education courses.

Ask one of your friends who hunts and you know to be a conscientious person in other areas of his/her life to be your mentor.

I recommend asking one of your friends to borrow a rifle for this trip. Someone will have something to borrow.

But if you do buy new, I recommend a Savage Accu-trigger rifle in .308 as a good all-purpose hunting rifle that costs between 500-600 new. Depending on the distance of shots you'll need an optic to go along with it. In GA, where I live, we take feral pigs at short distances because of all the cover.





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JustABozoOnThisBus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:54 AM
Response to Original message
17. When are you going?
Do you have time to take a hunter safety course? Many states offer them.

Do you need to buy a gun? Any friends/relatives have a gun you can borrow? If you buy a gun, you probably want to buy a scope, cleaning kit, gun case.

Do you have all the other gear? Clothes (with orange), boots, first aid kit, compass, maps, all the stuff you need to survive.

Mostly, stay safe, try not to shoot anybody, take pictures, enjoy the woods/swamp/fields.

:hi:
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seabeyond Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 10:04 AM
Response to Original message
18. no drinking BEFORE hunting. think cheney. nt
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HappyMe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 10:14 AM
Response to Original message
19. No info or advice -
just be safe and have fun.
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BiggJawn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 11:55 AM
Response to Original message
20. Be Safe and Enjoy!
I enjoy the shooting sports and don't mind hunting for food.

Puts me in the minority.
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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 11:56 AM
Response to Original message
21. You're male, right?
'Cause if you're female you can probably go show up at the range and be like "I'm a n00b! Can someone help me learn to sh00t?" and people will be falling over themselves to give you advice. :P
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seabeyond Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 11:57 AM
Response to Reply #21
22. and there, in a nutshell, is a female privilege. lol.
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bikebloke Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 12:27 PM
Response to Original message
24. Prime gun rule
Never point a gun, *even if you're sure it's unloaded*, at another person.

Anyway, it's not real hunting unless you kill using your teeth. :P
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era veteran Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 06:18 PM
Response to Original message
25. I want to hunt boar with a pike and a .45 for fun.
Lost the thrill of hunting decades ago but these boars are invasive and should be eliminated.
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 08:40 PM
Response to Reply #25
37.  If you use a properly set up Spear then the 45 would not be needed.
I have built several Boar Spears. Blade is 6" wide at the base, narrowing down to a point. The length of the blade is 18"and is made of 4140 carbon steel 3/8" thick. This is attached by a tapered and pinned 1 1/2" split oak or hickory shaft 8-12' long. There are rawhide monkey knots tied every 12". And a iron crosspiece that extends 6" from the center of the shaft, pinned 6" above the base of the blade.
In use you use trained dogs to corner the critter, when they are called off the hog will do one of 3 things.

Freeze in place
break and run
See you and have a deep desire to make you part of the landscape.

As the pig rushes you you stand fast and lower the tip of the spear to the level between the neck and the chest. Allow the beast to impale himself on the spear, that cross piece will stop him from running up the shaft and chewing on you before fe succumbs to blood loss and, if you are real good, or lucky, a heart that is cut in half.
Now the fun part. Hold onto the shaft of the spear as the hog dies. This is so that the blade will move inside the chest and create a real mess of things.
See, Simple.

Oneshooter
Armed and Livin in Texas
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era veteran Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:07 PM
Response to Reply #37
40. Sounds like a real sport
Have you done this?
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 10:45 PM
Response to Reply #40
44.  Yes. A few years ago I had a guide service . River bottom, lots of hogs.
Had one client who got bored of sticking arrows in them so I built a spear. Went through a few changes and he wanted to use it. Ended up I build 4 of them and sold them to the hunters who used them. It took about 40hrs per spear to build, I have a forge and anvil w/tools. Only had one complaint, that the shaft was too short, one fellow got into a 400lb hog and it scared hell out of him. Pissed off hog jaws only 6 ft from him!!
Guide service ended when the land owner refused to lease his land for it(580acres). Ended up that he and his son started guiding and hunting. Raised the price looking for a lot of fast cash. Service failed due to high prices!

As for me I have never done it. Always was the back up with a 45/70 to keep my clients from becoming pig food!

Oneshooter
Armed and Livin in Texas
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Lasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 12:18 AM
Response to Reply #44
47. Do you use a high pressure load of smokless powder in that 45/70?
Or is is a plack powder gun? Just curious. I think I'd prefer a .30-06 or maybe even just a Model .45 caliber 1911 Colt pistol for backup.
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 08:08 AM
Response to Reply #47
48.  I built the rifle from a siamese Mauser action and a 26"Navy Arms barrel
Currently loading is light 458 Win Mag loads with a 400gr JSP, Average velocity is 2000fps. Never lost a animal or a hunter using this rifle.
In close brush I use a Winchester Trapper w/16" barrel. Chambered in 45Colt I use a 240gr JSP at 1700fps. All the loads are my handloads.

I also shoot both Sharps, Reminton, and Winchester rifles with cast bullets and black powder. Loads of fun!

Oneshooter
Armed and Livin in Texas
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Lasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 10:13 PM
Response to Reply #48
56. I've got a 98 Mauser bored out to .30-06.
Obviously a Nazi rifle since it has small eagle & swastika symbols stamped in several places. A fine rifle I inherited from my grandfather, but I prefer my BAR II - also chambered for .30-06.
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-11-11 08:32 AM
Response to Reply #56
57.  I have a BAR also, but at 20lb. it is a little to heavy to carry hunting.
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Lasher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-11-11 09:48 AM
Response to Reply #57
58. I don't blame you. For that same reason I hardly ever take my Browning M2 out hunting.
But it's great for squirrels. If you hit them just right it kills them and cleans them too.
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-11-11 10:35 AM
Response to Reply #58
60.  My BAR is a semi-auto from Ohio Ordanace, 30-06 with 20rd mags.
Cant afford the full auto, they seem to go for 40-50 thousand a copy.
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era veteran Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 10:40 AM
Response to Reply #44
51. I am probably too old to handle the spear.
Edited on Thu Nov-10-11 10:41 AM by era veteran
Have read some about these ferrel creatures being crossbred with German/Eurasian Boars that made them so large now. They are apparently migrating from the south as some have been reported in Kentucky. Not verified but talk I have heard with hunters from around the state.
I am in the hospitality/ food service business with many years as an upscale chef and had cooked wild boar tenderloins which were fantastic. The thing about trichinosis in the following scares me a bit as no one has contracted it from domestic hogs for a long time. Would hate to see it get back in domestic piggeries. There is speculation among anthropologists that ferrel pigs lost by the early Spanish caused massive ecological problems and hastened the decline in their populations.

"As agricultural pests, they cause an estimated loss of 20,000 tons of sugarcane each year. There are also growing concerns among farmers about the spread of infection and parasites to domestic livestock. Wild boars are vectors of several serious diseases, including pseudorabies, which is fatal in panthers; swine brucellosis, which can be fatal in people; and trichinosis, a foodborne disease caused by a parasitic worm that lodges in the animals muscle tissue. The disease may be passed to humans who consume infected, undercooked meat and can be fatal if not treated. As the feral hog population continues to breed with escaped domestic stock, their genetic diversity continues to widen."

I am of the opinion that all invasive creatures and plant life be eradicated and or kept in check. Great to hear your insight as my experience with boars is from W Germany while on "field trips" with my tank unit. We did get drunk and throw rocks at them from on top a water trailer until they ran into the mess tent scaring the shit out of our cooks. We got orders not to play with the pigs anymore. LOL
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 05:48 PM
Response to Reply #51
54.  One of our specialties was hosting handicapped hunters
We had 5 box stands, built two feet above the ground on posts sunk 2 feet down. The stands were 6'x8' with windows and doors. Spread a couple of 5gal buckets of sour corn on the ground a 50-100yds range and there would be 10-20 pigs there inside of 30 min.
Each stand had a radio in it, and when the hunter made his shot he could call us to track and pick up the pig. Most were wheelchair bound, but others had conditions that made it difficult to walk.
I remember one hunter in a wheelchair who only wanted 3 sheets of plywood on the ground with a circle of brush, chest high to him, around it. That was his stand. He would watch them and photograph them. Then when he was ready he would use a 8" barrel .454 Casul and get the one he wanted! We supplied him with a radio, cooler with water/sodas and a lunch. He was a good customer till we lost the place. His last hunt he had upgraded to a .500 Smith & Wesson!
There are ALWAYS a way.

Oneshooter
Armed and Livin in Texas
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Deep13 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 06:22 PM
Response to Original message
26. My advice: be vewy, vewy quiet.
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trof Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 06:37 PM
Response to Original message
27. Sorry, bub. I echo previous comments.
Wild or feral hogs can be damn mean and vicious critters.
Boars and sows.
My first hunt was squirrels, which we did eat.
Very tasty.
I used a .22.
Later graduated to quail and then deer.
Learned to handle a shotgun.

I don't know how old you are or how much 'outdoors' experience you have, but I sure wouldn't start out my first time in the field with a gun hunting pigs.

Maybe you could just tag along and observe the first time?
You might carry a gun for protection, but know how to use it, and know that inexperienced hunters are the greatest cause of gunshot hunting accidents.
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zanana1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 06:47 PM
Response to Original message
28. Have fun. Don't shoot anything. nt
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bluedigger Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 07:17 PM
Response to Original message
29. Please reconsider.
Why would you want to go hunting one of North America's most dangerous wild game, with no firearms experience, and in the company of many other equally inexperienced friends? As others have said, responsible hunting involves training and takes time to develop skills. It's not a lark. Start with a drum circle maybe.

Get a Marlin 1895G "Guide Gun". Hard hitting power in a short and handy lever action. Open sights, not a scope. You'll be in brush. It only has a four round magazine, but if you don't drop the boar in four shots, it'll have you.
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Capn Sunshine Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 07:34 PM
Response to Reply #29
31. Read this. Then read it again.
Good advice. I should have re-read the OP.
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trof Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 07:34 PM
Response to Reply #29
32. Spot on.
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 08:57 PM
Response to Reply #29
38. drum circle
:spray: :rofl: :thumbsup:
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Capn Sunshine Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 07:32 PM
Response to Original message
30. since when do you use shotguns on Wild Boar?
Firstly, the pellets will be all over the meat. Not good. I'm pretty sure that you would want a high powered rifle. 30-06 is my rifle of choice. But if you get a shotgun, a Remmington Wingmaster model 870 is a great moderate expense gun, nice balance, easy pump.

Those of you that don't hunt, I can relate. I don't do it for the thrill of the kill. The idea is to eat what you take.
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RebelOne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:06 PM
Response to Reply #30
39. I am sorry,but most hunters hunt for the thrill of the kill.
I was a copy editor for outdoors magazines for 13 years. I had to read and edit first-hand stories from hunters. And the majority of them hunted for the thrill. In their words, their adrenaline started pumping after killing an animal. Most of the hunting was for trophies.
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Capn Sunshine Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:13 PM
Response to Reply #39
41. My family can't be that unusual
Our family traditions involve stewardship of the land. Responsible hunting goes hand in hand with this. We are taught this respect for the land from an early age. No "trophies " on any of our walls. Not for three hundred years. I'm sure there are others like us.
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 08:13 AM
Response to Reply #39
49. All of my hunting is for meat. That said there is a blight of feral hogs in Texas
Any more I get the meat processed and then donate it to charities here. Nice tax write off, fewer ferals tearing up the fields, more people getting protein.
Sounds like a win-win to me.

Oneshooter
Armed and Livin in Texas
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SteveM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:28 PM
Response to Reply #39
63. Hunting is thrilling; no apology for that. It is also for food...
Hunting, which involves becoming one with the countryside in which you hunt, is thrilling. The quarry doesn't detect you, though supremely equipped for it. The quarry uses cover when moving from one point to the other, as you also do. The quarry is about to slip away, you whistle, make a grunt sound, it stops for the last time.

Actually killing the animal is not much of a thrill; you are concentrating on making a good shot and noting landmarks by which to track the animal if it runs for a short distance. Then, you have the "thrill" of field dressing, moving the animal to camp, skinning, cleaning, quartering, icing down; later, you butcher or have it butchered and wrapped.

If there was no "thrill" to hunting, then we would merely pay the rancher to shoot over a fence to kill the cattle. In that case, why bother, and have a processor wrap it for you in some big facility.

I have taken one deer already, and plan on killing a second (third?) before season ends. My freezer should be full, and my blood pressure well lowered by reacquainting myself with one of human kind's oldest instinct: killing in order to survive, and honoring the animal, esp. by saving its antlers or horns as a trophy.

I have a few myself!
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RebelOne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 06:53 PM
Response to Reply #63
66. Then you are a trophy hunter if you save the animal's
horns or antlers. I still think you enjoy the thrill of the kill, as most trophy hunters do.
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SteveM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 07:08 PM
Response to Reply #66
67. I saved a couple (one for rattling, the other because of its beauty)...
Really, the 'kill' aspect is rather minor in the realm of emotions; the tracking, stalking/still hunting, the gaining of proper shooting stance, even "calling" is the thrill. But the actual shooting is a return to shooting-range basics as you have those other emotions are racing through, and even watching the dying animal run is an exercise in watching reactions, noting landmarks and direction.

The majority of my deer are antlerless (as the law defines) and in fact are does. The last three seasons, all my deer have been antlerless, so not much of a trophy person, here.

I detect some element of negativity with your category of "trophy hunter." The trophy hunters I have known, and the books I have read about their experiences, stress the need for taking does (to cut down the tendency of over-grazing and habitat destruction), and for proper care and use of the meat. Even the folks who pay $3,000+ to shoot a Boone & Crockett trophy have the meat processed and not wasted. If that is all they are after, It's not my cup of tea, but it is hardly the worst of offense.

The linking of "killing" per se with a "thrill" is more the work of some animal rights advocates or anti-hunters. As one hunter (who is also a clinical psychologist) said: If the only thrill in hunting is the desire to kill -- a pathology -- then most of these people would make very poor hunters, as this would be the dominant motivation, and not the whole zeitgeist of hunting.

You should taste my venison chili, or stew; no beans, here!
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Lance_Boyle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 04:16 PM
Response to Reply #30
53. sabot slugs for the win. n/t
Nice thing about a shotgun. Use it for birds, use it for deer, use it for rabbit and other varmints, use it for boar, use it for home defense.

If I were boar hunting with any sort of long gun it would be a shotgun, and I would be damned certain to have a magnum-chambered revolver on my hip in case it gets too close.

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Hotler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 07:35 PM
Response to Original message
33. I have friends that go down to Texas for boar.
makes for really breakfast sausage.
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trof Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 07:38 PM
Response to Reply #33
34. Me too. They hunt from pickups with .44 magnum hand guns.
sport
:eyes:
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Hotler Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 08:06 PM
Response to Reply #34
36. I like .44's. Boars are out of control in Texas. eom.
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Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:15 PM
Response to Reply #36
42. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
Deep13 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 11:09 PM
Response to Reply #34
45. It's pretty hard to hit anything more that a few yards away...
...with a handgun. And they aren't going to sit still while a truck drives up to them. The humans have to get out and approach on foot.
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oneshooter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 08:16 AM
Response to Reply #45
50.  Have you ever seen a true handgun hunter? 44 Mag is a good killer out to 50+yds on hogs. n/t
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Deep13 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 11:01 AM
Response to Reply #50
52. Well, I know it can be done. Just saying it isn't easy.
I shoot handguns at 50 feet (not .44 mag) and usually have a spread of a few inches.
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TK421 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 07:48 PM
Response to Original message
35. Here's what I can tell you...never stick your gun in a hole in the ground
because I've seen rabbits that will actually bend the barrel underneath and pull it out of another hole so the barrel is now facing your ass....I'm just saying, be careful out there
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Deep13 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 11:10 PM
Response to Reply #35
46. Wascals! nt
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hunter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-09-11 09:52 PM
Response to Original message
43. I use land mines.
Place a land mine on a well traveled boar trail.

Be sure to post warning signs to protect fellow humans. (This works because most boars can't read.)

Sit a good distance away out of sight of the boar trail, pop open a few beers, and wait for the explosion.

If you use a larger land mine you can cook the boar in the resulting pit.
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Old Troop Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-10-11 05:57 PM
Response to Original message
55. Take a weapons safety course first. Learning weapons safety by
cruising the net or watching Youtube videos is like learning to drive a car the same way.
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Swede Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Nov-11-11 10:21 AM
Response to Original message
59. I hear the Acme company will supply all your needs.
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Bonhomme Richard Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-17-11 10:38 AM
Response to Original message
61. Never assume that the people you are with have any common sense. n/t
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LibertyLover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Nov-17-11 12:55 PM
Response to Original message
62. I have only two pieces of advice regarding wild boars and hunting -
The first is: Don't miss. There is little on earth worse than a pissed off, wounded wild boar. The second is: learn field dressing - and I don't mean camouflage or bright orange clothes. If you are going hunting and want to eat what you've hunted, the kill needs to be properly prepared almost immediately. In the Middle Ages, the boar would be gutted and the organs given to the hunting dogs as a reward.
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applegrove Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 07:24 PM
Response to Original message
68. From what I can gather from what I've seen on the highway you must tie up
the dead boar to the hood of your car so everyone on the road can see your hunting prowess. LOL!
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SteveM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Dec-05-11 06:52 PM
Response to Reply #68
70. If it's tied to the hood, they'll surely smell your stink. nt
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Inchworm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-30-11 07:50 PM
Response to Original message
69. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finder link
http://www.fws.gov/offices /

I couldn't tell what state you are in, but this is a good place to start. You can get a lot of information just calling the 1-800 number (1-800-344-WILD). Once you narrow it down to local you can simply call and say, "Going on my first hunting trip...I have never handled or shot a gun....Are there any..." places you can direct me to take a Firearm Safety Course?

We took them in high school around here when I was growing up. You'll probably learn all you can asking the right questions once you get a "professional" on the line. It's what they do and they are always very happy to help people learn the whats and whyfors of wildlife. Hehe, hec, if the hunt seems too much you can ask about fishing licenses and spots to fish near camp.

Good luck and be CAREFUL. I'm glad you want to be informed before you go out there.

:hi:
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