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147th Anniv. of the Battle of Gettysburg tomorrow, Did you have a relative fight in the Civil War?

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charlie and algernon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 07:30 PM
Original message
147th Anniv. of the Battle of Gettysburg tomorrow, Did you have a relative fight in the Civil War?
On this day, June 30th, 1863, Brig. General Pettigrew's Confederates were approaching the outskirts of town while General Buford's Union Calvary already occupied defensive positions north of the town, waiting for the Confederates to a arrive and hoping to hell they could hold out long enough for the rest of the Union Army to arrive. The largest battle ever fought on American soil was just hours away...

So did you have any relatives involved in this crucial battle? Or in the Civil War in another battle(s)?

Me? I had a great, great, great, great grandfather who was part of the 83rd Pennsylvania who fought on Little Round Top on the Second Day. He witnessed the 20th Maine's famous counter charge down the hill to defend the left flank of the Union Army.
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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 07:32 PM
Response to Original message
1. I had no relatives in the Civil War
but it is nevertheless the shared heritage of all Americans. :patriot:
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The Velveteen Ocelot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 07:34 PM
Response to Original message
2. Yes, though I don't think they were in Gettysburg.
A great-great-great, etc., uncle left a fascinating diary about the war. He was in an Ohio regiment, as I recall, and was eventually killed by a sniper during the siege of Atlanta.
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jpak Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 07:54 PM
Response to Original message
3. Isn't that the one where Joshua Chamberlin and the 20th Maine handed Johnny Reb his Confederate ass?
:evilgrin:
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lazarus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 08:06 PM
Response to Original message
4. several
one was wounded and captured a the Siege of Vicksburg (MS), then paroled back to the CSA.

All my ancestors who fought were Rebs. I have two or three who should have fought, but I can't find any record of their service.
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NoPasaran Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 08:12 PM
Response to Original message
5. No Civil War relatives (my grandparents were part of the Ellis Island generation)
But I've been to Gettysburg and other battlefields many times.

I was at Gettysburg over a couple of cold, rainy days last October. The first afternoon I was wandering around Little Round Top, trying to get a feeling for the terrain. A busload of what I took to be private school students arrived, and the guide was telling them about Colonel Patrick O'Rorke, who took the 140th New York up the hill at a crucial moment. The guide mentioned that O'Rorke had graduated first in his class at West Point.

"Now, who knows what general finished last in his class?" asked the guide.

"George Bush!" shouted one of the kids.
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 01:18 PM
Response to Reply #5
32. ...
:rofl:

that is funny!
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tigereye Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 06:56 PM
Response to Reply #5
41. we ate at O Rorkes pub while there this week
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WolverineDG Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 06:57 PM
Response to Reply #5
42. It was either Grant or Custer but a
:thumbsup: to the smart kid! :rofl:

dg
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NoPasaran Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 07:42 PM
Response to Reply #42
45. Custer and Pickett both
Grant finished 21st out of 39.

I have read, though, that it wasn't really considered a dishonor to rank last in the class, since somewhere between half and two-thirds of cadets never graduated at all.
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proteus_lives Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 08:55 PM
Response to Original message
6. At least 3 of my ancestors fought for the Union.
I don't know if any of them were at Gettysburg but at least one of them was in Sherman's March to the Sea.

"He witnessed the 20th Maine's famous counter charge down the hill to defend the left flank of the Union Army."

The day the 20th Maine saved the Union!
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ColesCountyDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 08:56 PM
Response to Original message
7. My family all immigrated here in the early 20th Century. n/t
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Burma Jones Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 08:57 PM
Response to Original message
8. I had relatives fight on both sides
A few of them, out in Missouri, fought for both sides at different times, depending on who was paying more.
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necso Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 09:07 PM
Response to Original message
9. Nope,
Edited on Wed Jun-30-10 09:19 PM by necso
all more recent arrivals (or so I have been told).

But pappy was something of a civil war buff, and I remember going with him to some (fairly big) Gettysburg reenactment (specifically, of Pickett's charge... the 100th anniversary, maybe?) when I was a kid.

...

The combat of the 20th Maine (as recorded) is quite a fine piece of military unit action, involving two difficult maneuvers: refusing the (left) flank to deal with flanking attacks -- and swinging the barn door (the refused flank, line) around in counterattack.

There's a nice little animated gif illustrating these points at this link:

http://www.nps.gov/archive/gett/getttour/sidebar/chambl...
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applegrove Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 09:34 PM
Response to Original message
10. An ancestor of mine fought in the war of independance....on the side of the British. Settled in Nova
Scotia.
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madinmaryland Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 09:39 PM
Response to Original message
11. What part of PA was the 83rd PA from?
Edited on Wed Jun-30-10 09:45 PM by madinmaryland
I had several ancestors that fought in the war. I'm going to add a few to "find-a-grave" in the next few days.

My great-great-grandfather still has the "GAR" flag next to his grave! Yes, we were on the WINNING side of the war.

On my maternal side nearly all of the family died in a cholera epidemic in the mid 1850's, so there were none from that side of teh family.

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NoPasaran Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 10:39 PM
Response to Reply #11
16. 83rd Pennsylvania
Raised in Erie, Crawford and Forest Counties
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Crabby Appleton Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 09:44 PM
Response to Original message
12. My great grandfather and his 4 brothers all fought
Edited on Wed Jun-30-10 10:10 PM by Crabby Appleton
at Gettysburg in the Union Army 150th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

One brother was wounded at Gettysburg,Pa on July 1st 1863 with Col. Stone's Bucktails Brigade in the battle at McPherson's Farm and was later killed in action at Dabney Mills - Hatcher`s Run,VA near Petersburg on February 6th 1865 when the war was nearly over.
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 09:58 PM
Response to Original message
13. My G-G Grandfather was in the 13th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment
I have his civil war officer's sword and his writings about the war.



13th REGIMENT INFANTRY.

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., for one year's service May, 1861, but reorganized for three years and mustered in June 19, 1861. Left State for West Virginia July 4. Attached to Rosecrans' Brigade, McClellan's Army of West Virginia, July 1861. 1st Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, to September, 1861. Reynolds' Cheat Mountain Brigade, West Virginia, to November, 1861 Milroy's Command, Cheat Mountain District, W. Va., to January, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Landers' Division, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Shields' 2nd Division, Banks' 5th Army Corps and Dept. of the Shenandoah to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to July, 1862. Ferry's 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. Ferry's Brigade, Division at Suffolk, Va., 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, September, 1862. Foster's Provisional Brigade, Division at Suffolk, 7th Army Corps, to April, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 1st Brigade, Vogdes' Division, Folly Island, S.C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to January. 1864. 1st Brigade, Vogdes Division, Folly Island, S.C., Northern District, Dept. of the South, to February, 1864. 1st Brigade, Vogdes' Division, District of Florida, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 10th Army Corps, Army of the James, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Army Corps, to June, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, to December, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 24th Army Corps, to January, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Terry's Provisional Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to March, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 10th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to September, 1865.

SERVICE.--Campaign in West Virginia July 7-17, 1861. Battle of Rich Mountain July 11. Moved to Beverly July 13, thence to Cheat Mountain Pass. Operations on Cheat Mountain September 11-17. Cheat Mountain Pass September 12. Greenbrier River October 3-4. Scouting Expedition through the Kanawha District October 29-November 7. Expedition to Camp Baldwin December 11-14. Action at Camp Allegheny December 13. Moved to Green Springs Run December 18, and duty there till March, 1862. Skirmishes at Bath, Hancock, Great Cacapon Bridge, Alpine Station and Sir John's Run January 1-4. Advance on Winchester, Va., March 5-15. Kernstown March 22. Battle of Winchester March 23. Occupation of Mt. Jackson April 17. Summerville Heights May 7. March to Fredericksburg May 12-21, and return to Front Royal May 25-30. Battle of Port Republic June 9. Moved to the Peninsula, Va., June 29-July 2. At Harrison's Landing till August 16. Moved to Fortress Monroe August 16-23, thence to Suffolk, Va., August 30, and duty there till June 27, 1863. Reconnoissance to Franklin on the Blackwater October 3, 1862. Franklin October 3. Zuni Minor's Ford December 12. Expedition toward Blackwater January 8-10, 1863. Action at Deserted House January 30. Leesville April 4. Siege of Suffolk April 12-May 4. Edenton, Providence Church and Somerton Roads April 13. Suffolk April 17. Edenton Road April 24. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. Foster's Plantation May 20. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Expedition from White House to South Anna Bridge July 1-7. South Anna Bridge July 4. Moved to Folly Island, S.C., July 28-August 3. Siege operations against Fort Wagner, Morris Island and against Fort Sumpter and Charleston, S.C., till February, 1864. Capture of Forts Wagner and Gregg September 7, 1863. Stationed at Folly Island October, 1863, to February, 1864. Reenlisted December, 1863. Moved to Jacksonville, Fla., February 23, 1864, and duty there till April 17. Ordered to Hilton Head, S.C.; thence to Gloucester Point, Va. Butler's operations on Southside of the James River and against Petersburg and Richmond, Va., May 4-28. Occupation of Bermuda Hundred May 5. Port Walthal Junction May 6-7. Swift Creek May 9-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-28. Moved to White House, thence to Cold Harbor May 28-June 1. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12; before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to December 6, 1864. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30, 1864. Non-Veterans left front June 19. Mustered out June 24, 1864. Demonstration north of the James at Deep Bottom August 13-20. Battle of Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Detached duty at New York City during Election of 1864 November 4-17. Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., December 7-27. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 3-15, 1865. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Town Creek February 19-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at various points in North Carolina till September. Mustered out September 5, 1865. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 104 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 146 Enlisted men by disease. Total 255.
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JTG of the PRB Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 10:06 PM
Response to Original message
14. I had a great-great-great grandfather who helped France invade Mexico...
...and subsequently, because of France's defeat at the Battle of Puebla, helped lead to the celebration of Cinco de Mayo.

You're welcome. :P
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HipChick Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 10:08 PM
Response to Original message
15. No..but I have a civil war ghost that lives in my house...

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tigereye Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 06:58 PM
Response to Reply #15
43. my son refused to go on the Ghost Walk with me while in Gettysbyurg


:cry:
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Old Troop Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-02-10 05:29 PM
Response to Reply #15
46. Can you tell us about it?
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csziggy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 11:04 PM
Response to Original message
17. Yes, several, and so did my husband
None of my father's side of the family from the north had soldiers in the Civil War, but most of the men of the appropriate ages on Mom's side (from Alabama) were soldiers for the Confederate Army. Her father's grandfather on his father's side get married, enlisted, and died six weeks after enlisting, leaving his pregnant wife alone to have her son. He was in a Union prisoner of war camp in Charleston, Tennessee, and is buried there in an unmarked grave.

Grandfather's grandfather on his mother's side enlisted along with three of his brothers - he got his arm shot off "accidentally" according to the CSA records. When he came home with one arm, he learned to run his farm by himself. On Mom's mother's side, her mother's grandfather enlisted, was captured and helped in the camp's hospital. He became interested in medicine and learned enough that he was licensed as a doctor by the first licensing board in his part of Alabama - we have no records of him going to any college or medical school, but apparently he was a very good doctor.

His father provided goods to the Confederates and had to swear an oath of allegiance to the United States after the war.

My grandmother's mother's father did not enlist - he moved to Arkansas and died during the war. He was a doctor and he did provide goods for the Confederacy, so he may have participated in caring for soldiers at a camp that was set up in the county where he lived. He and one or two of his children died from disease, not from war injuries.


My husband's side had mostly Union soldiers but also some from Kentucky on the Confederate side. One of his relatives (not sure of the exact relationship) was killed at Chickmauga - since that was in Alabama, he could have been killed by one of my ancestors, though I have not researched which units fought there. Oddly enough, few of the Union records are available, mostly just pension records - barely enough to verify they are the right person. One of his ancestors we know was in the Union Army, but I have not been able to find him - I found eight or nine guys with the same name, but none of them are him.

I just got finished getting copies of their records from Footnote.com and am just starting to look up their companies and regiments to find out what their service would have covered. Since I am not into military history, it takes a lot of dedication for me to stick with reading the history, especially for the Confederates, since so much of their military history is written by people who want to glorify that past. :puke:

While I was brought up knowing that my Mom's relatives fought, there was more emphasis on what it cost the families in terms of men lost, lives wasted and how pointless it was.
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struggle4progress Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jun-30-10 11:04 PM
Response to Original message
18. Adam, from Pennsylvania. Captured at Petersburg. Spent time in one of the prison camps.
Caught TB there. Walked home after the war and died shortly after arriving. My GGGfather's brother

Some confederates from S Virginia on the other side. Don't know much about them. I think they were successful before the war. Maybe they didn't actually fight

By 1900, some of the Gkids had moved across the country and fell in love
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blue_roses_lib Donating Member (378 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 01:45 AM
Response to Original message
19. According to my mother..
I am related to Major Robert Anderson of Ft Sumter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Anderson_ (Civil_War)

According to her, "someone" has the genealogy papers that show this, but as of now I have no idea where they are, and I am afraid they disappeared with the passing of my grandparent's generation. I've done my own light digging on the internet, and have gone back to my GGgrandmother, and GGGaunt, who's last name is Anderson, whom I am named for, but I haven't been able to make the link between them and the major.

Genealogy~~~> addicting stuff.

My dad's side: my great uncle who just passed was a genealogy buff, and he has us traced back to when my 9 times-great grandfather came over from England in 1630 with John Winthrop. There were Revolutionary War soldiers on my dad's side, but I'm not sure about Civil War. I would assume so. We also have this fellow:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Phineas P. Gage (July 9?, 1823 May 21, 1860) was an American railroad construction foreman now remembered for his incredible survival of an accident in which a large iron rod was driven completely through his head, destroying much of his brain's left frontal lobe, and for that injury's reported effects on his personality and behavioreffects so profound that friends saw him as "no longer Gage."

Long called "the American Crowbar Case"once termed "the case which more than all others is calculated to excite our wonder, impair the value of prognosis, and even to subvert our physiological doctrines"<1>Phineas Gage influenced 19th-century discussion about the brain, particularly debate on cerebral localization,<2> and was perhaps the first case suggesting that damage to specific regions of the brain might affect personality and behavior.

Gage is a fixture in the curricula of neurology, psychology and related disciplines, and is frequently mentioned in books and academic papers; he also has a minor place in popular culture. Relative to this celebrity, the body of known fact about the case is remarkably small, which has allowed it to be cited, over the years, in support of various theories of the brain and mind wholly contradictory to one another. A survey of published accounts has found that even modern scientific presentations of Gage are usually greatly distortedexaggerating and even directly contradicting the established facts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phineas_Gage

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cool.
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Iggo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 02:22 AM
Response to Original message
20. Nope.
My white ancestors were still in Ireland and my brown ancestors were all in the American Southwest (recent the Mexican Northwest).
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Seneca Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 02:25 AM
Response to Original message
21. 3 of them, all grandfathers
One was at Gettysburg, and took part in Pickett's Charge, and survived.

The next 3 days are solemn for me, on the eve of the 4th.
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TZ Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 07:50 AM
Response to Original message
22. Nope...
Mine were too busy fleeing Russian Czars to worry about little foreign civil wars... ;)
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RoyGBiv Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 08:39 AM
Response to Original message
23. Several

One had been wounded at Brandy Station and arrived at Gettysburg the evening of July 2nd. He was wounded again at Gettysburg but fought in the battle at what's called East Cavalry Field.
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tinymontgomery Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 09:33 AM
Response to Original message
24. No
But we're heading up there and watch the reenactment on the 3rd and 4th. I wonder if it will turn out different this time?
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charlie and algernon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 09:36 AM
Response to Reply #24
25. haha, have fun!
I was there for the 130th and remember it being extraordinarily hot and VERY loud. But then I was very young at the time. I will absolutely be there in 2013 for the 150th weekend.
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old mark Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 09:40 AM
Response to Original message
26. We had several on both sides. nt
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Roon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 10:05 AM
Response to Original message
27. I have a great, great, (forget how many greats) grandfather
who fought for the south in the civil war. He's buried in nebraska.
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raccoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 10:35 AM
Response to Original message
28. Lemme tell you: if you had ancestors who lived in the Confederate States at the time,

if any one of your white male ancestors could breathe and walk, you had a relative in the Civil War.



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LibertyLover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 11:33 AM
Original message
Yes, my great great grandfather was in a Massachusetts regiment
Edited on Thu Jul-01-10 11:34 AM by LibertyLover
deleted - accidental double post. Sorry.
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LibertyLover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 11:33 AM
Response to Original message
29. Yes, my great great grandfather was in a Massachusetts regiment
His name was George Duncan. Although he lived in South Cairo, New York, on July 1st 1864 George went to Danvers, Massachusetts and mustered in as a volunteer in the Second Reg. Mass. Infantry. He died of chronic diarrhea in the hospital at Atlanta, Georgia on the 15th day of September 1864. His body was buried in Georgia although his name is beside that of his wife, Lavina, on the stone in Cairo Cemetery.
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semillama Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 12:34 PM
Response to Original message
30. Although I was raised in the far north of our country
my only Civil War ancestors were Johnny Rebs from Tennessee. Everyone else in my direct lineage managed to avoid enrollment in the armed forces during active conflicts.
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smoopie Donating Member (14 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 01:01 PM
Response to Original message
31. great great uncle
My great great Uncle Charles was in The 74th PA, He was wounded at Gettysburg and later died of small pox in a hospital in York Pa.
He is still in York buried in the soldiers circle in Prospect Hill Cemetery. My daughter, nephew and I went to Gettysburg and York to visit his grave and see the battlefield where he fought. He was only 21 years old.
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Maccagirl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 01:25 PM
Response to Original message
33. My GGGrandfather served with the 39th 8th Indiana Calvary
enlisting at age 18. He was injured and discharged in May 1862, but re-enlisted in October 1964 with the 140th Infantry Regiment. He was wounded again on December 8, 1864 at Murfreesboro, TN and had his hand amputated. His grandson (the son of my GGrandmother's half-brother) was given the government-issued iron hook that replaced his hand. Robert Roscoe was his name and he's buried at Bethel Cemetery in Bloomington, IN. My distant cousin found her GGrandfather buried in Tennessee (he served with the Union as a bugler at age 16) only yards away from a double-wide trailer with a huge Confederate flag flying from the pole. She wasn't sure who would be more offended-the trailer owner finding out that a Blue Jacket was buried so close to his home-or Gramps being so close to the flag that symbolized everything he fought against.
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RandomThoughts Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 01:30 PM
Response to Original message
34. Some people think of the South as the rebellion in that war, I think they were a form of status quo
Edited on Thu Jul-01-10 02:08 PM by RandomThoughts
There is something I think on often about the civil war, the term 'rebs' the term comes from rebellion. It always has negative thoughts in many groups, but there are times in the world were rebellion against bad is actually not rebellion. Not in that case, but there is to much attachment of rebellion and rebs and the confederacy in much thoughts.

Many people think on things like the civil war as a fight of the north against rebellion, I think it was against ideas of aristocracy, and lack of empathy and slavery. The rebellion of 1776 was the same Northern fight while they were in rebellion also, as were many partisan movements in many places.

It is hard to comment on Civil war because of the wrong of the confederacy, but I think on it as non status quo versus status quo. The Civil war was actually against the status quo, and a change in society, that unfortunately led to war, in that way the North could be seen as the rebs by changing the rules in the south. Very interesting thought on what is rebellion, and when it is good or bad, in context it has to be compared to the system that is the status quo, to have a view of good or bad.

The Northern rebellion against the souths ideas of what is acceptable seems to be the better rebellion in that story. While the South trying to hang onto a bad status quo was the establishment.

Being able to think of Rebellion within the context of the system, allows for seeing the difference between those that fight for freedom, and those that want to oppress. The rebel part is only about what is the status quo at some moment in time, not about being good or bad in itself.


It allows thinking on songs and movies with rebellion in them without the stigma that gets attached by many people.

And it allows for enjoying songs like this by assigning context.

Rebel Yell
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToeY7MkCm0c

Notice the wrong part of the song? I refused to do that. But to be fair to the singer, he could not sing that if he did not have it.

And yea I probably had Civil War relatives, although I don't follow stuff about heritage.






Thunderstruck
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvoeeq-BH4w
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dana_b Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 03:10 PM
Response to Original message
35. 2 Confederate and 1 Union
ggggranfathers. One was in the Union Tennessee 10th Cavalry, another was in the Confederate Tennessee 26th Infantry, and another in the Confederate Georgia Cavalry 3rd Regiment. All were privates and I don't believe that they were at Gettysburg.
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sarge43 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 04:55 PM
Response to Original message
36. Great great grandfather, Union Army
Don't know if there were others.
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Cleobulus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 05:45 PM
Response to Original message
37. Hmm, I had an ancestor who joined the Union Army from St. Louis in 1861.
Edited on Thu Jul-01-10 05:45 PM by Cleobulus
I think it was the 2nd Missouri Volunteer Infantry. He was a German immigrant.
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Old Troop Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 06:21 PM
Response to Original message
38. I have no direct evidence, but there are many Civil War veterans with
my surname. I also have a family album with pictures of men in Civil War (Union) uniforms but there is no explanatory note - no names or dates.
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tigereye Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 06:54 PM
Response to Original message
39. just got back from visiting there! (and no, my ancestors came to the US after)
Edited on Thu Jul-01-10 07:04 PM by tigereye
Wonderful, beautiful weather and so much to see and do! My legs are so tired. But seeing Little Round Top and the memorials to Chamberlain, Longstreet, Lee, etc. were so moving. And the Cyclorama is incredible! :wow:


We read The Killer Angels (amazing book) and watched Gettysburg, and it really made a difference when we finally saw the Battlefields. Chamberlain was amazing - charging down the hill against folks who still had ammo left, incredible! What was amazing though was to see that giant castle for NY up there (the view down into the valley was incredible!), after seeing the small monument to Chamberlain. Interesting.

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WolverineDG Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 06:55 PM
Response to Original message
40. Several, all Union
Not sure if they were part of any historic battles, but one was a POW & survived Andersonville. It was interesting that about the time my mom discovered this, I was doing a research project in history class about Andersonville & the Union equivalent (name escapes me now).

Another ancestor noted in his diary that he witnessed the launch of the Washington & Lincoln (air balloon), then went back to jotting down how much he got from cutting other soldier's hair. He later got sick, went home, & died.

dg
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Sky Masterson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-01-10 07:05 PM
Response to Original message
44. A few

Wilson Wentle 1863
The 36th Regiment,
Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia


George Henry Hess taken in 1862
79th Illinois Infantry Regiment Company "E"
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texanwitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-02-10 05:34 PM
Response to Original message
47. I had a Great something grandfather that fought for the south, might have a few more.
Later on he moved to Texas.
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Dyedinthewoolliberal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-02-10 05:36 PM
Response to Original message
48. Nope
My people were still in Canada just 10 years removed from Scotland.....
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Commie Pinko Dirtbag Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-02-10 05:38 PM
Response to Original message
49. My father.
Oh, you meant the American Civil War? Not the Spanish? :silly:
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