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My 84-year-old Dad had hip replacement surgery,

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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:28 AM
Original message
My 84-year-old Dad had hip replacement surgery,
so I flew out there for four days, beginning the day he got out of the hospital. The idea was to give Mom and the other siblings a break and some rest for those tough first days. I helped with teaching Dad techniques for getting around until he heals more, and did all the cooking and laundry, so Mom could get off her feet and get some rest.

Worked great, and my dad, who is a tough old coot, is now up and getting around famously with his walker. We worked on using stairs, since there are steps leading into every entrance of the house, and he's doing fine.

Lookin' old, though. But still "moving around and taking nourishment," as he says.

If you can, do this if your aging parent is coming home from the hospital. There's so much to do that someone needs to be around 24-hours the first few days. You'll be glad you did and your parents will appreciate it almost beyond description.
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NJmaverick Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:29 AM
Response to Original message
1. good for you, and I am glad he is doing well
:hi:
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femmocrat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:30 AM
Response to Original message
2. Sending you and your dad some extra special vibes today!
I hope he continues to do well. :hug:
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Heidi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:31 AM
Response to Original message
3. Totally agree, and glad your dad's doin' fine.
My mother-in-law had knee-replacement surgery on Tuesday, and we plan to help keep her up and moving when she gets home. It won't take a big effort since she's always been extremely active -- in fact, a lifetime of skiing is why her knees are shot.

Mornin', MM. The sandwiches were DELICIOUS! :hug: :hug:
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:33 AM
Response to Reply #3
5. Oooh...sandwiches....
Wish your MIL a quick recovery for me!
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Roon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 12:51 PM
Response to Reply #3
9. My step-Father had one of his knees replaced
and it shook him up so bad that he lost over 100lbs. after the surgery. They aren't going to replace his other knee because this time it just might kill him. He is in his late 70's.
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Heidi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 01:25 PM
Response to Reply #9
10. That's horrible! What was his physical condition prior to surgery?
Edited on Thu Jul-23-09 01:25 PM by Heidi
My dad, who just turned 65 and has been a runner for most of his adult life, had one of his knees replaced last winter and did just fine. He now is suffering from Stage IV liver cancer and won't probably have his other knee replaced, but he says the knee that was replaced makes him feel 30 years younger. If chemo hadn't cut so deeply into his energy, he says he'd want to be running again (ill-advised, I know, but he REALLY loves running). :shrug:

I'm so sorry this has been a bad thing for your stepfather, Roon. That sucks, sucks, sucks. :hug:
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Roon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 08:25 PM
Response to Reply #10
23. He was very healthy before the knee surgery
that's what makes it so bizarree. Then in the last year he developed spinal stenosis and is even worse off. He uses a lift to get up and down the stairs and they are getting him a powerchair too.
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 02:33 PM
Response to Reply #9
13. Apparently, knees are harder to recover from than hips.
I can see that. My MIL had a knee replacement and the recovery period was tough. For my dad, he's already pretty mobile, just over a week post-op, and the physical therapist said that's typical, although he thinks my dad is recovering very well.

I'm sorry to hear about your father!
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Roon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 08:26 PM
Response to Reply #13
24. Thanks mineral man
:hug:
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:33 AM
Response to Original message
4. There's so much to do that someone needs to be around 24-hours
the first few days. So Very True! Bless you for being there. :hug:

You will always have these memories and be able to smile when you look back on this episode.
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:38 AM
Response to Original message
6. Another note about this:
My brother-in-law is a freeperish sort of guy, but we had a discussion about the health care issue with regard to my dad. The BIL is 64, like me, and will be going on Medicare next year. I asked him how he felt about that and asked if he knew that Medicare and my parent's supplement meant that this surgery and recovery wasn't going to cost them a penny.

He had to think about it a bit, but finally allowed as how that "soshulized medcine" might not be so bad, in the end. I pointed out that there was no "rationing" involved, given that an 85-year-old man got an expensive procedure that would make his remaining years more comfortable.

I left him thinking about his positions on health care.
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Scout Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 12:45 PM
Response to Original message
7. my husband is having same surgery at end of August...
i will be his coach and main caretaker when he comes home.

my sisters, my uncle, and hubby's friends will all be available to help and/or to give me and him a break from each other!

we know other people who've had the surgery, and are sooooooo glad they did it ... if for no other reason than to be pain free, but they've had great improvements in mobility too.

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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 02:34 PM
Response to Reply #7
14. I'm sure he'll do fine.
I was amazed at the result, and so was my father. His hip had hurt bad for some time, and he had put off getting the surgery. Now he says he wishes he had done it a year ago.
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Roon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 12:49 PM
Response to Original message
8. My Father got his hip replaced last winter..he is 61-years-old
He had my step-Mother there for him so he was able to heal up very nicely. Walker,cane, and now he is walking on his own. I don't know if he's played any golf yet,I need to give him a call.
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 02:41 PM
Response to Reply #8
17. Good for him! I'm 64, and have no
joint problems at this point, for which I'm very happy.
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Roon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 08:22 PM
Response to Reply #17
22. Great!!
:hi:
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Swede Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 01:42 PM
Response to Original message
11. Good job MineralMan.
Yes,we have to look after our aging parents.
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 02:38 PM
Response to Reply #11
15. I agree. I don't see any alternative.
They cared for us when we were kids, and that's no easy job. Helping them in their old age should be a responsibility we all embrace. Not everyone does, sadly, and it's a shame on them.

Nursing homes should be a last resort, in my opinion, and only used when you can no longer care for them properly. Keeping old people as independent as possible keeps them healthy and doing the very best they can. Once independence goes, there's little reason to keep going, and a lot of people just drift into complete inactivity and death. I want my parents around as long as they're still enjoying their lives to any degree. That's their wish, too. With 11 great-grandkids, they're still enjoying a lot of things.
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Burma Jones Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 01:51 PM
Response to Original message
12. You da Mensch
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 02:40 PM
Response to Reply #12
16. It's easy to do what's right.
Not doing what's right is the hard choice, and you pay for it severely.
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applegrove Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 02:43 PM
Response to Original message
18. He seems to be healing really fast. My sister was the one who helped
my mom in those early days after her hip replacement. My mom spend a month in hospital and rehabilitation. Now she's doing great re:her hip. No pain.
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Zoigal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 03:18 PM
Response to Original message
19. Thank you, Mineral Man, for being there
when your parents needed you. Wish there were more like you.
Share your opinion re nursing homes. Have visited them with my therapy
dogs often, and have seen too many sad, depressed folks. Just waiting....z
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trof Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 04:43 PM
Response to Original message
20. My uncle used to say that.
"How you doin' Uncle Tom?"
"Well...I'm able to sit up and take nourishment."
;-)
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dembotoz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 04:51 PM
Response to Original message
21. mother had both replaced and is now 87
vast improvement in the quality of her life.
If she had not had that done, she would be in assisted living.

literal life saver

wish your dad well
well worth the risk of surgery
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Jeff In Milwaukee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:08 PM
Response to Original message
25. ...But if this were the Canadian healthcare system...
He'd be forced to listen to Gordon Lightfoot albums for six months while waiting for his surgery.

I'm glad your dad is up and about!
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LeftyFingerPop Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-23-09 10:10 PM
Response to Original message
26. You're a good son...
you should be proud of yourself. Best wishes to your family.
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-24-09 11:33 AM
Response to Reply #26
28. Thanks, but that's not why I posted.
I just wanted to encourage people to do this if they can. It's important, especially with parents in their 80s. It's just all too much for them without help the first few days after surgery. Besides, surgical patients that age often are sent to temporary care, and that's not much fun at all. It's way easier to recover at home, but there needs to be someone there to handle all the things that need doing.

I was glad to be able to help, and my parents really appreciated it. That's worth a lot to me.
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csziggy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-24-09 03:07 AM
Response to Original message
27. You are a terrific person! A tip for those with mobility problems
Or relatives with them - if you need a lift chair, they can be found pretty cheaply on Craigslist, as can the motorized wheelchairs and scooters. You may have to watch out for smells, but an enzyme cleaner can take care of most of that.

The big thing to consider is that the older lift chairs do NOT have a battery backup like the fancier, newer ones do so if there is a power outage, there could be a problem. But I got the one I have for $50 - an incredibly cheap price for a powered lift chair!

I have not watched for the wheelchairs and scooters, just have seen them in some of the ads along with the lift chairs.
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MineralMan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jul-24-09 11:36 AM
Response to Reply #27
29. Thanks, but I was just doing what was needful. Your info
on lift chairs, etc. is well-placed. Craigs List is a great source for that type of thing, and at bargain prices, too. For those without adequate supplemental policies for their Medicare, it can be a lifesaver.

Virtually anything you need in that line can be found in the Craigs List of most sizable cities, from crutches and walkers to lift chairs and mobility scooters. Hospital-type beds, too, although you'll want a new mattress for them.
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