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Abused/abandoned dogs: emotional problems?

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brentspeak Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 02:01 PM
Original message
Abused/abandoned dogs: emotional problems?
Last year, I had a neighbor whose black lab didn't know that he was supposed to lift his leg to pee. He just would stand there, and let it just dribble down his legs.

The neighbor explained that the dog's first home was abusive, and his second abandoned him. So, for whatever reason - lack of socialization with other dogs, emotional problems -- the lab didn't know how to properly relieve himself.

Is kind of thing common with abused dogs?
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Lil Missy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 02:18 PM
Response to Original message
1. If I'd been abused, then subsequently abandoned, I'd probably piss down my leg too.
I've seen worse.

What makes you bring it up today?
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brentspeak Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 02:34 PM
Response to Reply #1
4. Just finished reading an article about shelter animals
and remembered the dog from last year.
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Lil Missy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 02:40 PM
Response to Reply #4
5. I just wondered. I saw some horrible things with creepy neighbors.
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northernlights Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 02:31 PM
Response to Original message
2. my lab cross was a shelter puppy
he doesn't always bother to lift his leg. A couple times he's accidentally peed on one of his front legs, usually when it's dark and cold and late. I just walk him through snow to get it clean.

My newest rescue pup is almost a year old and doesn't always bother to lift his leg either.

They both crouch down and pee when they don't feel like lifting a leg. It seems to be a bit of laziness to me. When there are stranger dogs around they are more likely to behave like "manly" dogs.

I don't think either has been abused, although the new pup may have been abandoned. I don't know his history at all, other than he was a couple days from being gassed in GA when I pulled him.

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cherish44 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 02:33 PM
Response to Original message
3. I had dogs that didn't lift their legs to pee
My cocker spaniel would sometimes just pee where he was standing. Could be a nervous condition but my dog was never abused.
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merh Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 02:47 PM
Response to Original message
6. I've rescued two dogs that were abused and abandoned.
Edited on Sat Mar-14-09 02:56 PM by merh
They were "awww so cute" puppies but then they did the not so cute puppy things like chewing and yapping and peeing. Once the puppy cuteness was forgotten they were abused and abandoned. Slapped for too much yapping or for chewing the wrong things or for peeing in the house. For almost the first two years of her life one was put in a dog pin, a 6 foot fenced off area of concrete - there she was left to exist, eat, pee and sleep, when she'd escape she would be beaten and put back into the pin. The other was chained to a stake in the yard and left for most of the day, then shoved in a kennel at night in the garage. Oh, and they were expensive pure bred pups, folks spent money for them - the first a pug and the second, a yorkie.

They are two of the brightest, most playful, happy, obedient and well adjusted dogs I've ever owned, it just took time to work with them and a great deal of positive reinforcement. The most "maladjusted" characteristic is they love to be near me, one of them has to be touching my feet when he naps at my feet.


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ogneopasno Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 03:20 PM
Response to Original message
7. I own and have known of other dogs who were abused or neglected and didn't know how to play.
Pretty pathetic.
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Lil Missy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 03:27 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. But they learned, with some TLC. Right?
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ogneopasno Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 04:23 PM
Response to Reply #8
9. Eventually. The one I own is in the process of doing so, but he's come along very well.
Poor guy was about a year old when we got him six months ago; he just had no idea whatsoever about what to do when someone threw a ball or a stick or got excited about something. He's still shy, but so much better than he used to be.
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trof Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 04:26 PM
Response to Original message
10. Interesting observation about canine urination.
We all know male dogs lift a leg, and females squat.
But I've see females that lift and males that squat.
Go figure.
:shrug:
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femmocrat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 05:08 PM
Response to Original message
11. Our vet once told me that leg-lifting is a learned behavior.
It has nothing to do with propriety! My neutered males never lifted their legs, but my spayed female lifts hers. She also kicks up turf afterwards, but I'm not sure what that means! (Except that she is very bossy!) LOL

Males lift their legs to mark territory, the higher up the "pee post", the more superior in the pack order.
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TheCentepedeShoes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 05:27 PM
Response to Original message
12. Our standard poodle
was neutered at 6 months. The Dr said he might not do the leg lift because of it and he never has. He plants his feet (does the patented Larry Craig Wide Stance) so he never pees on himself. And he does kick up turf sometimes after pooping.
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rainbow4321 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 06:12 PM
Response to Original message
13. My schnauzer was a rescue dog and had bad separation anxiety
For MONTHS I could not so much as walk into another room without her bolting to my side, her nose against my leg. The first few days were the worst, I tried to take her for a walk the day I got her and she spent the entire time pressed up against my leg...no walking ahead or exploring. While we were at home she would crawl into my lap and just quiver.
I've had her for four years now and she still has some separation issues...even if I just go out for the mail and come right back in she acts like I've been gone for a week.
The worst thing for her are thunderstorms. I've always wondered if it's because she was a stray on the streets when the rescue group found her, I'm sure she was exposed to some pretty nasty weather. They said her fur was long and knotted/matted so she had been out there for a while. She will shake nonstop when there is a thunderstorm..to the point where the whole bed vibrates if the storms are in the middle of the night. NOTHING calms her down. If it's during the day she'll run to me, get in my lap and shake nonstop.
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Mike 03 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 06:16 PM
Response to Original message
14. Hard to answer in a short post, but...
I've worked with dogs for almost ten years, including many that were severely abused.

I have a black lab male that does not lift his leg to urinate, and he was never abused.

There are much worse problems associated with abuse in dogs, and if that is the only one this dog has, I would be very relieved.

That is nothing compared to some of the symptoms a seriously abused dog can exhibit. You would be horrified if you knew how bad it could get.

I would thank my lucky stars that my dog's only symptom was a urination disorder.

But it's great that you care enough to ask this question. You sound like a conscientious and caring dog owner.

Good luck.
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 06:20 PM
Response to Original message
15. I have a female dog that was abused as a puppy
When we first got her at about 9 months of age, if I wasn't careful about the way I walked up to her, she would immediately start to pee. She did this for a number of years. She is now about 16 years old and she still shakes with fear occasionally, so one thing I can tell you is the effects of abuse can sometimes last a lifetime.
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gardenista Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 08:58 PM
Response to Original message
16. Love is the answer
Lots of unconditional love. Our beautiful girl was so abused that she was literally afraid of her own shadow. Always cowering and afraid of getting hit. We celebrated when she finally came out of her shell enough to "steal" some food from the counter, because we knew that it meant she wasn't afraid we'd beat her down.

After two years of never ever hitting her for any reason, gentle and consistent training (she likes rules and boundaries), and at least an hour walking on the leash every day, she is a well adjusted, sweet, wonderful dog that we can take anywhere. It's a miracle that this dog loves all humans and other dogs. She is a beautiful spirit.

Long quiet cuddles on the couch also helped.

That lab will come along with a lot of love and exposure to other gentle dogs.
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seemunkee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-14-09 11:04 PM
Response to Original message
17. My rescue boy doesn't raise his leg
He does a crouch to pee. He occasionally does a half hearted leg raise since going to the dog park and seeing other dogs do it.
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