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I wish that I lived somewhere with Indian food delivery

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JVS Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 07:34 AM
Original message
I wish that I lived somewhere with Indian food delivery
I used to, and it beat pizza delivery by a mile.
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Drunken Girlfriend Donating Member (310 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 08:30 AM
Response to Original message
1. Indian food
There isn't one Indian restaurant here in Oshawa Ontario Canada,
I would have to travel an hr to Toronto.

I wouldn't mind having some curry chicken or roti right about now.

I'm on a diet,so I guess it's another boring salad for my lunch today.lol
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LiberalEsto Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 09:29 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Here's an easy recipe for you to try
Sweet Potato Curry
This makes a lot -- you can use it for several lunches and dinners.

Rice
2 sweet potatos, peeled and cut into small chunks
2 white potatos, peeled and cut into small chunks
2 tablespoons of olive oil
1 can of vegetable or chicken broth
1 can of coconut milk
1 cup of frozen peas
1 to 3 tablespoons of curry powder, depending on taste
1 cup of chopped cilantro leaves
1 teaspoon cumin seed (optional)
1 finely chopped onion. (optional)
Salt to taste

Prepare rice in a separate pot according to package directions.

Peel and cut up the potatos.
Heat the olive oil in a large cooking pot using medium heat.
If youre using onion, put that in first and cook until translucent.
If not, add the potato chunks, curry powder and cumin seed.
Stir gently until everything is coated with oil and curry.
Add the broth and coconut milk.
Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally.
Turn the heat down and simmer on medium low heat for 20 to 25 minutes, or until potatos are soft.
Add frozen peas and cook 2 to 3 more minutes.

Serve with boiled rice, top with chopped cilantro.

A nice accompaniment is

Cucumber Raita

Half a cucumber
1 cup plain yogurt
Salt to taste
Pinch of red pepper flakes (optional)
Pinch of black mustard seeds (optional)

Grate a peeled cucumber.
Squeeze out excess liquid.
Add yogurt and seasonings, and stir.
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BarenakedLady Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 09:41 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. Yummy!
I'll have to try that.

Thanks.
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LiberalEsto Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 11:59 AM
Response to Reply #3
10. Here's another easy one to try
Edited on Wed Jan-21-09 12:00 PM by LiberalEsto
Cauliflower, pea and potato curry

You'll need
1 head of cauliflower
2 or 3 potatoes
1 cup (more or less) of frozen peas
1 clove of garlic, minced
chopped onion, if desired
1 or 2 tablespoons of oil (I use olive oil)
curry powder (1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon, depending on taste)
salt to taste (maybe 1 teaspoon)
optional: red pepper flakes, cumin seeds, fresh cilantro leaves, freshly squeezed lemon
Cooked rice

I usually microwave the unpeeled potatoes until they are almost done to save time, but you can also boil them, peeled or unpeeled.

Boil a pot of water.
Break up the cauliflower into pieces and place in the boiling water for 5 minutes.
Drain the cauliflower.

Cut the partly-cooked cauliflower and potatoes into bite-sized chunks.

Heat the olive oil in a very large pan or wok. Add the onion, garlic, curry powder and, if using, red pepper and cumin seeds. Let them heat up a bit but not brown. Add the cauliflower and stir to coat with the seasonings. Then add the potato and continue stir-frying for maybe 5 minutes. Finally, add the peas and about 1 cup of water, stir, cover the pan, lower it to a simmer and let it cook gently for however long it takes for the cauliflower to be just tender. Maybe 15-20 minutes, maybe longer.

Serve over cooked rice, topped with a spoonful of plain yogurt, a squeeze of lemon, and /or chopped cilantro leaves.
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yellowdogintexas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 06:59 PM
Response to Reply #10
14. that is my most favorite Indian dish of all. LOVE it.
I found a mix for Cauliflower Gobi and I add whatever veg suits my fancy and it is fabulous
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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 10:16 AM
Response to Reply #2
5. What is this curry powder you speak of?
:shrug:

:hide:
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LiberalEsto Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 11:24 AM
Response to Reply #5
8. Here you go
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Inchworm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 12:50 PM
Response to Reply #8
12. Curry powder seems common in this cuisine
Is all curry powder the same?

When a recipe calls for Chili Powder I break out the mortar and pestle and grind up cumin, red pepper and hit it with a dash of cayenne.

Are there basics to Curry Powder?

:9
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LiberalEsto Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 02:16 PM
Response to Reply #12
13. Curry powders vary greatly
Edited on Wed Jan-21-09 02:17 PM by LiberalEsto
Real Indian cooks make their own blends, which are called masalas. Commercial curry powders are a short-cut to avoid having to buy, grind, and blend whole spices especially for each dish. I'm just an amateur at Indian cooking, though I've managed to season some of my efforts with turmeric, cayenne pepper, ground coriander, ground cumin, black mustard seeds, etc. I'm fortunate to live near a small Indian food market. Their spices are amazingly inexpensive compared to those sold in supermarkets.

Some folks also rely on prepared curry pastes, which come in jars.

It's a good idea to pick up an Indian cookbook or two. See if your local library has any. One of my daughters gave me a fabulous cookbook for Christmas. It's "Flavors of India, Vegetarian Indian Cuisine" by Shanta Rimbark Sacharoff (1996)Book Publishing Company, Summertown, TN.
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cemaphonic Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 10:05 PM
Response to Reply #13
15. Yeah, that's the core of a pretty typical blend for the sort of Indian food we know in the West.
Which is mostly Delhi and Punjabi cuisine (which was were most of the British Empire presence in India was located)

Along with those spices, fenugreek seed (essential, if you are trying to get close to the commercial curry powder blends), cloves, nutmeg, mace and cardamon are pretty common. Cinnamon sometimes (plus it is a key ingredient in another Indian spice blend called Garam Masala). A little salt usually helps too.

For proportions, I would go - 1 tsp cumin and coriander, 1/4 tsp fenugreek and tumeric, and 1/8 tsp of whatever other spices you are putting in.
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myrna minx Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 11:27 AM
Response to Reply #2
9. Oh good lord. I would do anything for a trough of this, right now. n/t
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FloridaJudy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 10:14 AM
Response to Original message
4. I wish I lived somewhere with Indian food. Period.
There are many students from India living here, but I guess they do all their own cooking.

I'd sure like some matar paneer. Sigh.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 10:16 AM
Response to Original message
6. That would be awesome.
:thumbsup:
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Arugula Latte Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 11:19 AM
Response to Original message
7. Me too. We have Indian food takeout, but it is a bit of a drive at rushhour/dinnertime.
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jobycom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jan-21-09 12:38 PM
Response to Original message
11. Start a service.
Start one of those services where you deliver food from all restaurants for a small fee. Then get rich enough to hire someone to run the business. Then you can call them to deliver it, and they'll probably give you preferential service.
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