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Wow, I did the math. Making your own moonshine is incredibly cost saving.

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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:05 AM
Original message
Wow, I did the math. Making your own moonshine is incredibly cost saving.
After you have your still made, all you need is bulk sugar and yeast. Pennies on the dollar compared to buying it. $5 worth of raw materials for a couple liters of white lightning!

Anybody make their own moonshine? I'm seriously tempted to start. A country boy can survive! Woah!

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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:13 AM
Response to Original message
1. Are you for real?
I know some people who know some people.
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:15 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Yeah. I was inspired by this book
Possum Living

http://www.f4.ca/text/possumliving.htm

It's actually a pretty funny read. I was just browsing through it, and read the section on making moonshine. Then I was like, "holy shit I could do that, easy!"
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:18 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. Making it is fairly easy. Hiding it is the issue.
Them thar revynooers will gitcha real bad :D
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:27 AM
Response to Reply #3
6. them revenuers don't get much call around these parts
plus i drink all the evidence.

:D
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:32 AM
Response to Reply #6
7. how big a still?
Don't they produce by the gallons?
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:34 AM
Response to Reply #7
9. not an expert here, but i guess they produce as much or little as you want
depending on the size and contents

i was just planning on doing a small, dutch oven type still that would supply me and my friends for a couple weeks a batch
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:37 AM
Response to Reply #9
12. what are you going to use ?
apples? peaches? corn? apricots?
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:40 AM
Response to Reply #12
13. granulated sugar and my fungus friends
:)

it's said that using just sugar will avoid many of the undesirable chemicals in the resulting distillation. (like methanol)
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:42 AM
Response to Reply #13
16. JUST the sugar and the yeast??
Don't they need something to "work" on?
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:48 AM
Response to Reply #16
18. yeast eats sugar and pisses alcohol and farts carbon dioxide
:)

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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:52 AM
Response to Reply #18
19. does that mean it tastes like piss, too?
but, really ... I have never known of this just sugar and yeast. Rye, Potatoes, Juniper Berries, SOMETHING :shrug:
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:54 AM
Response to Reply #19
22. Technically sugar is something. It's just condensed plant sugars from cane, rather than in the form
of fruits. :P

You do need the other nutrients that usually come with fruit though.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:56 AM
Response to Reply #22
26. well duh!! and I quote:
"You do need the other nutrients that usually come with fruit though."

Raw cane and yeast = something I have never drank that I know of....

NOT that I am big drinker or anything :blush: :)
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:57 AM
Response to Reply #26
28. i think rum is distilled sugar cane
not sure tho
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:00 AM
Response to Reply #28
29. hmmm...so then he will be making rum, right? which is NOT moonshine
an alcoholic liquor or spirit distilled from molasses or some other fermented sugar-cane product.

Rum is a distilled beverage made from sugarcane by-products such as molasses and sugarcane juice by a process of fermentation and distillation. The distillate, a clear liquid, is then usually aged in oak and other barrels. The majority of the world's rum production occurs in and around the Caribbean and in several South American countries, such as Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana and Brazil, though there are rum producers in places such as Australia, Fiji, India, Reunion Island, Mauritius, and elsewhere around the world.

Rum is produced in a variety of styles. Light rums are commonly used in cocktails. In addition to cocktails, golden and dark rums are appropriate for drinking straight, or as a brandy for cooking. Premium rums are also available that are made to be consumed straight or with ice.

Rum plays a part in the culture of most islands of the West Indies, and has famous associations with the Royal Navy (See: Grog) and piracy (See: Bumbo). Rum has also served as a popular medium of exchange that helped to promote slavery along with providing economic instigation for Australia's Rum Rebellion and the American Revolution.<1>

more at link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rum
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:04 AM
Response to Reply #29
33. hehe, i think we're splitting hairs here
the reason moonshine was traditionally made from corn is because that's what the backwoods people already had. They had a shitload of corn so there was no reason to go and buy sugar from the store to make moonshine.

But in today's society, going to the store and buy a 5 lb bag of sugar is more economical because i don't grow corn.

Moonshine, white lightning, whatever you want to call it....i want to get drunk off of distillation of fermented sugar
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:05 AM
Response to Reply #33
34. Moonshine is whatever yew can make in yer back yard.
Or in yer barn, if yer worried about people seein' it. :)
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:10 AM
Response to Reply #34
38. You better have a BIG backyard. Of course, this is small scale.
Very interesting...this discussion.
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:04 PM
Response to Reply #38
78. Just remember, what you're doing is quite dangerous
Basically it's the equivalent of cooking gasoline and is not for the faint of heart. It's reasonably safe so long as you take prudent precautions, but the potential for fucking up royally is quite high.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:08 AM
Response to Reply #33
37. How much liquor will a 5 lb bag of sugar yield?
Dude, this lady at work, her Father makes it and she was talking just yesterday about the 50 lb bags of sugar sitting around the house.
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:15 AM
Response to Reply #37
39. at least a liter
from what i've read. Distilling is not a cut and dry process tho, you will get varing degrees of alcohol concentration because of the complication of evaporation of chemicals when they are combined.

it's definitely not 100% ethanol in the distillate.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:19 AM
Response to Reply #39
41. by percent do you mean proof? as in how "strong" it is?
gawd, I am such an idjit. Really though, I think it is great that you want to do this.
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:21 AM
Response to Reply #41
44. well from what i've read
it would be at least 100 proof (50% alcohol), probably a lot more than that

you would definitely have to mix it with something. it would taste like paint thinner.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:24 AM
Response to Reply #44
46. mix it with something?? hmmmm....wonder that would be?
:crazy:
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:27 AM
Response to Reply #46
49. in a perfect world, Purplesaurus Rex Kool Aid
but they don't make it anymore :(

so i will have to settle for Hawaiian Punch
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:29 AM
Response to Reply #49
52. Purple Jesus!! zounds!! I got it now. You are making PJ
:bounce:
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:01 AM
Response to Reply #28
31. Not as distilled as regular white sugar.
I think it's made mostly of molasses.

... which I've used a bit of in my mead brewing. And it ends up rather nifty. :)
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Jamastiene Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:54 AM
Response to Reply #19
23. I know.
Corn or something. :shrug:
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:57 AM
Response to Reply #23
27. Thank you!!
:hi:
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LynneSin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 09:35 AM
Response to Reply #3
69. Revynooers don't care as long as you aren't selling the hooch
you can make your own, just can't sell it - hence why people brew their own beer and make their own wine.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 09:57 AM
Response to Reply #69
72. it was a joke. n/t
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:26 AM
Response to Original message
4. The still's gonna be the expensive part. Copper's gone up in price lately.
And you don't want to go cheap on the materials, that's how you get tainted stuff that makes people go blind.

And you'll need some kind of yeast nutrients too. Sugar'll get 'em going, but without the right nutrients they'll end up either dying too soon and wasting a lot of your materials, or surviving by mixing up weird chemicals that you don't want in your brew.
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:35 AM
Response to Reply #4
10. i hear aluminum is bad for distilling
stainless steel or copper is the way to go. Also, even if you use good materials, discard the heads and tails.
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:37 AM
Response to Reply #10
11. You definitely want copper for the tubes.
I don't know about the body of it, I've never done any distilling myself. Just seen a few things about it while looking for brewing information. :)
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:07 PM
Response to Reply #11
79. You don't have to use copper
It just does the best job and is easiest to find.
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JVS Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:26 AM
Response to Original message
5. Just the sugar any yeast will yield a horrible swill that you won't like.
First you need a still. Make one of those, and then you have to generate something to distill. The cheapest thing to do is sugar water and yeast, however normal sugar water and brewers yeast does not make a terribly strong product. This means that you have to do a lot of distilling to get things up to strength. So for a little more, you can get a protein additive and turbo yeast instead of regular brewers yeast that will allow you to make a stronger sugar water mix that will ferment up to about 18% and thus requires less distillation.
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:32 AM
Response to Reply #5
8. turbo yeast, LOL
that just cracks me up for some reason
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Inchworm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:40 AM
Response to Original message
14. Glad I checked in before Craig- Woot!
Get you a beer keg if you are gonna make a pot-type still. That's a good casual size.

It's a fun hobby. Winemaking is fruitful too :D

Beer.. you reeealy have to like the taste because the buzz:time ratio sux.

:beer:
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BrotherBuzz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:41 AM
Response to Original message
15. Moonshine? Sugar and Yeast?
Yuck! WE make grappa.

Grappa is what we make after pressing the red wines. Brandy, too. We can make a quart in about an hour - eighty proof.

The 'still' is nothing but a beer keg with the top cut off and replaced with a huge wok filled with ice. Inside the keg sits two gallons of crap wine or grappa pomace (Oh, ok, we use sugar for this step) and a couple of bricks to hold a rabbit dish above the wine level. Wine is heated to vapor - condenses on the cold surface of wok and runs down and rains into rabbit bowl. The HS chemistry teacher part of our pack runs the proofing dept and says batches consistently runs 40%. Simple, no?
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Inchworm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:46 AM
Response to Reply #15
17. Mmmmm Brandy
I need to hunt some down. It's been a while :D

Good explanation btw.

:toast:
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:52 AM
Response to Reply #15
20. Nice and simple.
And if something happens to your water supply, you've got a way to distill your own clean water too. :P
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BrotherBuzz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:00 AM
Response to Reply #20
30. Down side to that....
Foul water, lack of ice, and fuel shortage often run hand in hand. I believe a simple solar still would be the best bet, assuming you live in a warm sunny place. You know what I mean, Vern?



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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:02 AM
Response to Reply #30
32. Hmmm, good point.
Might have to switch the old-fashioned air-cooled tubes style for that.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:53 AM
Response to Reply #15
21. At some point there were grapes in the process, right?
:shrug:
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BrotherBuzz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:18 AM
Response to Reply #21
40. It takes a lot of beer to make wine....
and it takes a lot of wine to make grappa. True grappa is made from the pressings of red wine. Sugar and water are added and it's allowed to ferment a second time (Yeast is still VERY active after pressing). The pressings, or pomace, impart flavor that makes grappa a vast improvement over crude moonshine.

Our brandies are made from the lesser white wines culled from the cellars. These wines have no specific fault other than just being plain or mundane.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:22 AM
Response to Reply #40
45. and wasn't the original wine made from grapes?
right?
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BrotherBuzz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:36 AM
Response to Reply #45
55. Yep, and we drink it
Point being, grappa is made from a normally discarded byproduct of wine making in California.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:42 AM
Response to Reply #55
58. point being there was a third ingredient, at the beginning. Sorry
to be hardheaded about this point. I just have never heard of "Moonshine" not being some type. Where I come from it is almost a badge of honor as to what "type" of shine one is drinking.
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BrotherBuzz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 02:17 AM
Response to Reply #58
62. We drink beer made from barley while we make wine.
Never occurred to us to us we could just distill the beer to make a proper moonshine and dispense with the grape. Your point is valid and my ignorance is glaring simply because moonshine has little cultural impact in my California roots.

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XemaSab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 04:42 AM
Response to Reply #62
66. You can also "jack" alcohol
For example, this one time me and a friend put champaigne in the freezer and forgot about it.

Hours later we CAREFULLY opened it, poured the liquid off the slush and drank that.

Yummy and potent. :D
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:55 AM
Response to Reply #15
24. i'm looking at the economics of it, not the taste
if i had wine just laying around, i would drink it.

the reason i say use yeast and sugar is because it's the cheapest and you get less methanol from the distillation
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Inchworm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:56 AM
Response to Reply #24
25. ...
"if i had wine just laying around, i would drink it."

:rofl: :rofl:

Amen!

:rofl:
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:07 AM
Response to Reply #24
36. Well, in that case...
if you're willing to wait, you could always try making your own wine or something like that.

I bought a case of one gallon glass jugs and some airlocks for them, and I've been brewing mead one gallon at a time for a while now. Doesn't take much work, all I do is put it in my basement near the furnace when its brewing, the I move it away from the furnace to a cooler area when its done brewing. :)

I'm a snob though, so I let mine age for a year or so after brewing. But most wine type drinks are done brewing within one or two months. Less if you use a really active yeast.
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:19 AM
Response to Reply #36
42. no, making it to get drunk
(just being honest)

economics and time are the firstmost priorities.

mead would be good though. I like it. My friend makes some of it every year. He is into Asatru, so it is like a religious thing with him.
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:20 AM
Response to Reply #42
43. Ah, yes. Drinking, pillaging, burning.
Very important to the Asatru. :)
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:25 AM
Response to Reply #43
47. what else is there in life?
those are my three greatest pasttimes

:shrug:
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:26 AM
Response to Reply #47
48. Just remember to do them in the right order.
Pillage, THEN burn. It doesn't work the other way around.
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:28 AM
Response to Reply #48
51. no it does
it's just not as profitable
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DarkTirade Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:38 AM
Response to Reply #51
56. ... still fun though.
:evilgrin:
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Richard Steele Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:40 AM
Response to Reply #24
57. Well, if you're running your own still, you can take "taste" right out of the equation.
You don't have to distill it at a 'drinkable' proof level, y'know.
You can use the "Vodka concept"- take whatever you have that's fermented,
distill it to tasteless 200-proof ethanol, and then cut it
back to 80 or 100 proof with water.

Just for the record, I've made "wine" using nothing but
sugar and yeast, and it's not that bad.

And I'm intending to build myself a still one of these days-
there's a scrapyard I know of that always seems to have a few
bigass stainlees-steel gas cylinders lying about that I think
would be ideal for the purpose. They're already plumbed on top
for standard hose-fittings,and they're CHEAP- they're literally
selling them for what the weight of the metal is worth.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:44 AM
Response to Reply #57
60. well, fancy meeting you here --
:hi:
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Richard Steele Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 02:12 AM
Response to Reply #60
61. Fancy it? Sure, why not? I've "fancied" meeting you lots of places worse than this!
;-)

How's your day been, TA? Mine was pretty darned GOOd, I must say.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 02:23 AM
Response to Reply #61
63. good to hear. Another average day here except the night is so cold.
brrr. Where is some moonshine when you need some :D
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:05 AM
Response to Original message
35. wiki entry on Moonshine
Flavoring Mixtures might consist of fruits, or even bark. The mash may be cooked through birch bark to achieve a mint like flavor. The product might be cooked through a screen of fruit to achieve a fruit like flavor. Fruits may be added to the liquor to add this flavor; however, it may not be as strong of flavor.

Moonshine is a common term for home-distilled alcohol, especially in places where this production is illegal.

The name is often assumed to be derived from the fact that moonshine producers and smugglers would often work at night (i.e. under the light of the moon) to avoid arrest for producing illegal liquor. In daytime the smoke from a still would be visible from afar. The 1811 edition of the Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, originally by Francis Grose, defines "moonshine" as follows: "A matter or mouthful of moonshine; a trifle, nothing. The white brandy smuggled on the coasts of Kent and Sussex, and the gin in the north of Yorkshire, are also called moonshine."<1> It has been suggested that the term might derive from smugglers' explaining away their boxes and barrels as "mere moonshine" (that is, nothing).<2>


and LOTS more at link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonshine
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 09:30 AM
Response to Reply #35
67. I tried it years ago
I used a large modified pressure cooker as my still and it worked reasonably well. It just takes a long time to produce very much.

I suspect that this is legal in most states so long as you're only making it for your own use. I'm not sure if that's true, but even if it is illegal I doubt the ATF is going to kick in your door over such a small operation.

The great thing about fermenting pure sugar is you don't get very much methanol in the mash, particularly so if you use Turbo Yeast. So your distillation doesn't have to be perfect, but still it pays to be as precise as you can for taste purposes. The more more by-products you get, the worse the shit is going to taste.

After you get the distilled product, you may want to experiment with soaking the finished product in various type of fruits like apples or plums.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 11:24 AM
Response to Reply #67
73. How is this any different from Sour Mash?
Sour mash is the name for a process in the distilling industry that uses material from an older batch of mash to start fermentation in the batch currently being made, similar to the making of sourdough bread. It was developed by either Dr. James C. Crow or Dr. Jason S. Amburgey while they were working at the Old Oscar Pepper Distillery (now the Woodford Reserve Distillery) in Woodford County, Kentucky.<1> Sour mash is not a type or flavor of whiskey, as is commonly thought.

The mash is the mixture of fermented grain and water from which the raw "beer" is made. In the sour mash process an established and active strain of live yeast is introduced into a grain & water mixture that is to be fermented. By using an established and known fermented "sour", this fermentation process controls the introduction and growth of foreign bacteria and yeasts that could damage the whiskey, and improves the consistency and quality of the liquor, so that every bottle tastes as close to the same as possible. Sour mash is popular in bourbon whiskey and Tennessee whiskey.

more at link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sour_mash
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:35 PM
Response to Reply #73
74. Mash is just the generic name for the fermentation batch
Whenever you're fermenting anything, you have to use care to grow the organisms you want and not bad bacteria that you don't want. This is true for all sorts of processes like making bread, yogurt, beer or whatever. Bad bacteria tend not to like lower PH levels which is why you can keep sourdough starter going for decades without any ill effects.

Sour mash is really better suited for larger commercial operations where you're doing continuous batches and you get a few benefits from keeping generation after generation of your yeast going. Since most likely you're only going to be doing one or two batches at a time, this is not really applicable. Just make sure that everything you use for fermentation is extremely clean and sterilized before you start.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:38 PM
Response to Reply #74
75. I think this is why
"underground" stills end up going to mass production. It is just easier to keep it going. Kind of like those dough starter kits for bread. :shrug:

Even if you have a small operation you would keep producing and stashing the stuff back. Good friends, only, ;)
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:43 PM
Response to Reply #75
76. This is quite popular in France and perhaps throughout Europe
It seemed like every family I knew in France had a relative that was a farmer and made their own hooch. Much of it was made from apples or other fruits and it was surprisingly very good stuff. They had a name for it but it escapes me at the moment.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 12:46 PM
Response to Reply #76
77. Over the years, I have had many very nice shots of ...
"Homemade Brew"

I don't know (after this thead) if it can all be classified as Moonshine but, it was delicious nonetheless.

Fire in the belly and flush to the Face :o
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Inchworm Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:11 PM
Response to Reply #77
80. If you spent much time in Appalachia...
There is something people usually call "bonded liquor" that makes the rounds. It's also called brandy, double-run and I can't think of the other terms atm.

I really think it is neither bonded or brandy but it's good damn stuff.

:9
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KG Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:27 AM
Response to Original message
50. a hundred pounds of yeast and some copper line...
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:30 AM
Response to Reply #50
53. Copperhead Road --
:thumbsup:
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Lethe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:32 AM
Response to Original message
54. LOL wow this thread is way bigger than i ever thought it would be
Let's do this thing.
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:43 AM
Response to Reply #54
59. do it Dude!!
:bounce:

I want a sampling :D :toast:
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 09:47 AM
Response to Reply #54
71. One other thing....
you may want to consider if you really want to go hi-tech with this would be to install a PID controller on the still for precise temp control. PIDs became popular after I got out of doing it myself, but I've often wondered how well this would work.

Basically what you would do is to install a J or K type temperature probe that makes contact with the mash inside the still. This probe is connected to the input of the PID. The PID is hooked up to a solid state relay that drives a hot plate under the still. You just set the PID to the temperature you want. It turns on the hot plate when needed. However, unlike a typical temp controller, there is no hysteresis. The PID controls the temperature precisely which is really nice for a still. The Fuji PXR3 works well and is $65 on ebay. There are some other Chinese made PIDs that are cheaper, but I have no experience with them.

One other thing you will want to do is toss the first part of the batch. Only use the alcohol that comes out once your still gets going really well. You don't really want the last part of the batch either, but it takes a bit of practice to know when to stop.
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Robeson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 03:07 AM
Response to Original message
64. No, I don't make my own, but I do have a good connection with someone who...
...sells aged moonshine, in various flavors, too!
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Tuesday Afternoon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 03:15 AM
Response to Reply #64
65. have you read the whole thread?
Edited on Thu Jan-15-09 03:24 AM by Tuesday Afternoon
He is not into the "flavors" ;) :D :hi:
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MajorChode Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 09:33 AM
Response to Reply #65
68. He probably will be when he tries his own hooch
Unless you really know what you're doing, single distilled homemade hooch goes down pretty rough. If you're a hardcore alchy, no problem.
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Symarip Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 09:37 AM
Response to Original message
70. I have a home distiller
And I already make my own beer from grain. It's just an extra step after that. Piece of cake.
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huskerlaw Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jan-15-09 01:16 PM
Response to Original message
81. Locking.
It may be cheaper, but it's illegal. When you factor in the court costs, fines, attorney fees, etc. I'm guessing it's no longer cheaper.

huskerlaw
DU Moderator
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