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Is there any way to hide my browsing history from the network administrator?

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Clintonista2 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 05:20 PM
Original message
Is there any way to hide my browsing history from the network administrator?
n/t
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Xipe Totec Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 05:25 PM
Response to Original message
1. Remote desktop to your home computer and browse from there. n/t
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notadmblnd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 05:26 PM
Response to Original message
2. Delete it?
under tools in your browser go to options and delete your history and cookies.
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noamnety Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:34 PM
Response to Reply #2
10. ha, no.
We use a relatively lame networky thing where I work, nothing fancy. Even so, it doesn't matter at all if you delete your entire hard drive. From the server, I see a list of every site you've gone to, how many pages and which pages you went to while you were there, and how many seconds you spent at each page. And all if it is categorized automatically by our service - so if I want to sort all internet hits on our network by "sports sites" it's clear to me within seconds who has been to sports sites 1200 times vs. 4 times. Ditto for adult sites, personal sites, news sites, etc. Same is true just for number of hits - so I don't have to sort through each employee's records to see whose been spending a lot of time online. I can just sort by number of internet hits and see that employee X has gone to 200 web pages a day for a total of 3 hours a day. That would be true even if the user was using a proxy server ... the number of pages and amount of time online would still be visible in an instant, and sortable so the high end users jump out in a snap. On our service, the one thing we couldn't see was password protected hits - if I log into my yahoo mail from work, the server might show that I went to 10 different yahoo pages, but it wouldn't pull up the actual emails.

However, that's the server logs. I also run a program within the computer lab that lets me see each students' screen on my monitor in real time, and the administration could easily be doing the same to me without my knowing it. In those cases, it wouldn't matter if the content was through a proxy server or password protected. Their screen is on my screen when I want it to be.
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elifino Donating Member (331 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 05:28 PM
Response to Original message
3. Not from our IT Dept.
I work in our IT Dept. and it is possible to follow every site you go to. We do do not monitor every workstation, the report is only produced if requested by a users supervisor.
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Idealism Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 05:40 PM
Response to Original message
4. The first thing to come to mind: porn?
The second: Republican dillweed boss?

The third: Both?
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deadmessengers Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:05 PM
Response to Original message
5. They can easily monitor what's going on on their network, yes.
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Commie Pinko Dirtbag Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:09 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. ...including your OP. If they're investigating you, you're screwn. Sorry. -nt
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Recursion Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:15 PM
Response to Original message
7. Transport-level encryption
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deadmessengers Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:18 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. SSL's great, but...
SSL won't do anything to hide where you're going - only what you sent or received while you were there.
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Recursion Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:20 PM
Response to Reply #8
9. Oh, that part's easy; use an anoymous proxy
Plenty of those also offer ssl; google for them and find one of the ones that uses a one-way translation so that your intended URL is not recoverable from the actual request.
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oldtime dfl_er Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:34 PM
Response to Original message
11. A 7-layer wipe?
Edited on Fri Dec-26-08 06:35 PM by oldtime dfl_er
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sentelle Donating Member (659 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:38 PM
Response to Original message
12. The short answer is...
No.
All activity that passes from your internal network to the outside world (the Internet) passes through some gateway.

Gateways can be monitored for who is doing what.

And before you take the advice of others with anonymizers, remember this:

Remote desktop'ing (aka RDP'ing) can be traced. They won't be tracing your web activity, but they will see the connection to your home machine, see that it is on port 3389, and know exactly what you are doing. Doing that, puts the suspicion on more than pr0n, but on corporate espionage. Additionally, remote desktop uses a lot of bandwidth, so it makes itself known rather well.

Anonymysers and secure proxies. Again, all the traffic to one web site, will track a competant IT person to the possibility of a DDOS attack, with zombies on their network. If they investigate, they will find the proxy and block it. Again busted. Even if it is secure, it still leaves a trace as to where you are going, and by what means.
Port 80 means a web browser.
Port 443 means a secure connection with a web browser (means we see where you are going but not what exactly is happening).

If you are being investigated, we can simply watch what happens on your screen, and if it violates policy, take screenshots. At my job, we do it all the time, and yes, it leads to firings.

Bottom line: if you signed an agreement with your employer, follow what you agreed to.
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Statistical Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 06:48 PM
Response to Original message
13. The only option is in the future to use an anymous redirector
Essentially instead of browsing the web you go to an anymous gateway and enter your requests there.

The problem is any competent IT admin will have a blacklist (on an update service) that will block access to any anonymous gateway.

Once you visit DU or any website on a corporate network a record will be in the logs. There is nothing you can do on your local machine to erase it.

Become friends with the IT admins. Couple grep commands and they could accidentally erase from the logs every site you visited (or maybe just DU?).
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tritsofme Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-26-08 07:37 PM
Response to Original message
14. I have moved all non-business related browsing to my iPhone.
It makes me feel more secure about my employer not having records of any personal browsings.

The type of tracking technology described on this thread seem to make me feel better about my decision.
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