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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 04:05 PM
Original message
Ok, I'm taking a vacation and need some help.
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 04:18 PM by peruban
I'm taking a month long trip to south america and want to take some reading material with me for plane, train, and bus rides I'll be taking. There's also the long waiting at airports and other time wasting. I have no ipod or anything, just books, lots and lots of books - plus there's always the library. If you had your choice, what books would you take with you and why? The books have no limit of topic or other restriction. It can be a religious text, a textbook, a novel, a play,philosophy, a book of poems, spanish language texts or literature, pretty much anything. Just give me some ideas and keep in mind that I can really only take about 5-10 books depending on their size and such.
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Symarip Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 04:06 PM
Response to Original message
1. Don't Know Much About The Bible
It's a good read. Examines the bible and alot of misconceptions. You can enjoy it if you're religious or an atheist like me. A genuine fun read.
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nickgutierrez Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 04:08 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. Really, any of the "Don't know much about..." books
I've got the ones on U.S. History and Space. They're both fantastic, and I've heard other good reviews about the one on the bible, too.
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Symarip Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 04:09 PM
Response to Reply #2
3. We should swap.
I heard the one on US History is pretty good! I'm glad to read other people know what I'm talking about. Sometimes I tell the people at work about these books and they look at me funny.

I know I look like Frankenstein. That's not the point!
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 04:10 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. "Don't know much about..." is that a series of books?
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 04:12 PM by peruban
Like those "Idiot's guide to ..." books in the 90's? How about something more specific?
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redqueen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 05:17 PM
Response to Reply #4
7. Yes, I think it is.
I have one about the civil war.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 08:18 PM
Response to Reply #7
26. A historical read, then?
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 09:10 PM by peruban
I have Prescott's "History of the Conquest of Peru" but it's combined with his "History of the Conquest of Mexico" and the book is like four inches think. I could go to the library tomorrow and try to find something more concise. I don't have many "portable" history books so I have to go get specialized literature in this case. Thanks for the idea!
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malta blue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 04:34 PM
Response to Original message
5. A month in south america?
Your bag is going to weigh a ton if you take books with you...

Just sayin' :shrug:
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 04:48 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. That's why I'm only taking 5-10 or so.
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 04:48 PM by peruban
I figure two to five in my carry on and remaining three to five in my check-in bag.
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malta blue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 05:27 PM
Response to Reply #6
8. I hauled books all over Israel in 1990 so I just had some
bad memories of my dufflebag busting in Amsterdam and seeeing all my stuff in the plastic bin on the baggage claim conveyer belt. :blush:

Anyhow, where are you travelling? Maybe I can gear some recs toward your itinerary.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 06:29 PM
Response to Reply #8
10. I'm going to Lima to visit family for the holidays.
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 06:55 PM by peruban
And also plan a week long trip to Macchu Pichu in Cusco. It's pretty much the trip of my lifetime, so I want meaningful inspiration to carry along. I'm thinking a beat reader anthology or a novel or I don't know what. I have Prescott's "History of the Conquest of Peru" but it's like four inches thick and probably be a downer in some ways. Oh, and I've already decided one of the books I'm taking is a pocket english/spanish dictionary. I don't trust my knowledge of vocabulary in Spanish very well. I was born here and was educated in english, I just picked up spanish going to church and through family and the streets so it's a little rough around the edges. I can say what I want to say but I lack the elegance and eloquence of polite expression and courtesy normally given in public environments.
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malta blue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 06:58 PM
Response to Reply #10
14. try the Celestine Prophecy by James Redfield.
It's new-age adventure through Peru - I read it but only for the journey part, but I do know many who found the new-age philosophy very enlightening.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:01 PM
Response to Reply #14
15. I have that one, read it some years back along with the companion study guide.
It was in my sophomore year of college, I think. Haven't read the subsequent novels in the series, though, but I heard they were mostly just trying to create a new franchise and there was less actual substance. Do you know anything about that?
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malta blue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:05 PM
Response to Reply #15
17. never heard of that part....
It seemed a likely candidate for that kind of scheme though :shrug:
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:25 PM
Response to Reply #17
20. Yeah, it was called "The Tenth Prophesy" or some other bullplop name like that. n/m
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 07:45 PM by peruban
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Tangerine LaBamba Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-06-08 09:28 PM
Response to Reply #6
43. Two books
"Franklin and Winston" - http://www.amazon.com/Franklin-Winston-Intimate-Portrai...

"Memoirs Of The Second World War" - http://www.amazon.com/Franklin-Winston-Intimate-Portrai...

Having lived for a good long time in South America - mostly Lima - I want to tell you that when you're on a train or in a bus, you're going to be watching the terrain go by and the other people on the bus. I traveled with more loose chickens roaming buses than I ever expected to.

You'll read the books when you're in airports, or in the air. The rest of it keep your eyes on a gorgeous continent.

And the idea of schlepping ten books is just nuts, for what it's worth. You really plan to read a book every three days? Really?

Have a great time.
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lunatica Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 05:31 PM
Response to Original message
9. Take a notebook and write your jouney journal
It may seem silly now but you might read it years from now and think it's pretty good. Write about the places by describing them, or making little drawings, adding photographs taken from the free brochures you pick up. Write little anecdotes, write floating descriptions of people you see, write about the customs, the lines in the airports, your impressions of your fellow passengers.

You might end up having a lot of fun.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 06:32 PM
Response to Reply #9
11. Oh, I'm definintely doing that.
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 07:04 PM by peruban
Got two spiral notebooks, one college ruled, the other graph paper, a small hand sized notepad, two Pentel 0.7mm mechanical pencils full of lead, and two thick pink erasers to walk around with, I bring two of each as backups. I'm also taking a small calculator for metric and monetary conversions (no, I can't do them in my head and I don't want to get ripped off when converting dollars in the street), an att global connect cell phone and my best hiking and summer clothes. The only thing left is to buy a couple of slacks and another pair of jeans tomorrow and figure out what books to bring along. Plus, I have to completely clean my entire room from top to bottom because some friend of the family will be staying in it while I'm gone because of construction on his house. Whew! Glad I waited to the last minute to do all of it! I fly out Monday afternoon.
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hippywife Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 08:06 PM
Response to Reply #11
24. I think I would have gone
for a small hardback bound journal since it's going to be packed, repacked and hauled around. Would hold up much better than spiral bound.

Have a great time. Friends of mine when last year and loved, loved, loved it! Brought back some of the best pictures.

Speaking of pictures, I saw where you said you couldn't afford to take a digital camera. Check your local craigslist or see if your local camera shop sells used equipment for people. Also check a pawn shop. By the time you get all your conventional pictures printed, you'll end up spending a bundle.

I love Michael Pollan books. You might enjoy The Botany of Desire. It's a good book for a trip. :hi:
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 08:54 PM
Response to Reply #24
29. Small books. Definintly makes for the ability to take a couple more along.
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 09:03 PM by peruban
For variety's sake. Got a few good candidates I'm looking at now. Avoid the large books.

And, there's great news! I just got my sister to lend me one of her digital cameras!!!!!

I'm so happy!!
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RushIsRot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 06:43 PM
Response to Original message
12. I went to Peru in 1970. We actually explored Machu Picchu by
candle light and then slept in one of the thatched huts at the site. I don't think that is allowed any longer.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 06:50 PM
Response to Reply #12
13. Yeah, I'm going alone so I'm going to take a tour
Maybe meet some other English speaking tourists, though I can get along with Spanish just fine. I'm planning two days there, one of them being the summer solstice, and have heard I can get a reasonable hotel for about $60 a night or so. It's practically a two day trek to get there give the plane ride and the eight hour train ride with bus rides in between and all. So that will take up about a week of time and I can hopefully be back in Lima in time to celebrate the holidays down there with the family.
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RushIsRot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 11:15 PM
Response to Reply #13
37. I hope you also get to Sacsayhuaman while in Cuzco.
It is well worth the visit. There's also another ruin within sight of Sacsayhuaman that's worth the visit, IIRC.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacsayhuam%C3%A1n
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-06-08 12:04 AM
Response to Reply #37
38. If it's in Cusco
I'll definitely look into it. I don't even really have an itinerary. I put all of this down to the last couple of days and am scrambling for stuff to spend time doing. I will visit Pachacamac, it's not too far of a drive from Lima:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pachacamac

I have some very interesting archeological objects of interest I found just lying about in the sand there last time I went when I was 18. Things like a leather heel to a spanish boot with tiny handmade hobnails in it. Fragments of pottery was just everywhere, I found some with interesting patterns. More gruesomely, though, I found bone fragments like a collar bone, the hinge of a knee joint, part of an jaw hinge bone (the IMJ part with partial earhole fragment), and what appears to be a small skull fragment. There were other, smaller fragments, I just picked up some of the more interesting and blatantly exposed fragments.

Unfortunately, I can't afford to visit the Nazca lines as they are so far in the south of the country and renting a plane to view them from above just doesn't work with my budget.

Sacsayhuaman, though, I can look into. Thanks.
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RushIsRot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-06-08 11:50 AM
Response to Reply #38
39. I didn't get to the Nazca Lines when I was down there either. I'm
not even sure that I was aware of them at the time.

We hired several locals and drove out in the desert where they knew of burials. One of them dug down and came across some pottery. I still have one of the pots that were uncovered. I smuggled it out of the country wrapped in some dirty underwear.

They must have dug down about twelve feet. It appeared to be a popular place for digging because skeletons were scattered about on the surface. I was worried that the sides of the pit in the sand would collapse in on the digger, but he was able to get out of the pit with no incident.

Be sure and eat lomo saltada while down there. It is delicious. There was also a baked fish dish which I cannot remember the name, but it was cooked with peppers and also delicious.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-06-08 07:05 PM
Response to Reply #39
40. Yes, grave robbing is pretty rampant and uncontrollable.
That's why you probably saw so many scattered remains. I feel bad about taking the fragments I did but they were just in open view in the sand, no digging required.

The national museum is a good place to see whole preserved mummies and other kind of artifacts.

I actually make lomo saltado here, it's basically sauteed strips of steak, onions, peppers, potatoes and some spices served over rice. I'm more looking forward to eating at different cevicherias since I like seafood so much.
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pitohui Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:02 PM
Response to Original message
16. bring at least one book that is study material and can be re-used
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 07:04 PM by pitohui
i do travels like that primarily to see birds so the bird book would be one, yikes, the south american bird books are pretty brutal in regard to size so shhhh! i didn't say this, but get used copies and just cut out the plates and carry those

or whatever hobby you have, a friend carries a suduko book, but anything you would like to study, could be a language text whatever

the purpose of this book is that even when you run out of reading material, then it is something you can usefully review

religious or political text, that's a BIG no in my humble opinion, in some countries you could be putting people on the spot if you share your politics, and religion in public places is just in poor taste plus could cause you to be misjudged or disliked

for reading enjoyment, i would pick out fairly dense books -- cloud atlas by david mitchell, infinite jest by david foster wallace, pandora's star by peter hamilton, any of the iain banks space operas...

light breezy airplane books are OK but plan to leave them on the bus, airplane, wherever when you finish them

oh, and if you're staying at hostels, it may be possible for you to trade a book you have finished for some other traveler's book -- some hotels have these libraries too -- just ask -- some hotels you can't keep the book, you can only read it whilst you're staying there, but borrowing a book still allows you to "stretch" your own books further -- you'd be surprised what's in foreign libraries -- some suck, all those romance novels in the hotel in tana, madagascar, but some are really interesting, a surprisingly good collection of singularity/humanist lit in a hotel in costa rica -- it's kinda luck of the draw


i don't take library books except on car trips, they are too heavy, i take paperbacks, leaving/trading most of them along the way -- a library book would have to be carted all the way back home even once you're done reading it, so don't

i would never haul along an ipod or all that electronic crap on a leisure travel, i do agree that books are much better


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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:23 PM
Response to Reply #16
19. Thanks.
I'm a little too old for hostels, plus I don't they they have those in south america like they do in europe. I have family to stay with, uncles, aunts and stuff - and will be staying in small bed and breakfast type places if not not just a regular hotel for just a few days.

A reference book, or something to review, you say. Hmmm, good idea, I'll take something familiar, maybe a small math or science text, or maybe a small book on proper spanish grammar in addition to my translation dictionary. I definitely want to take something that I'll bring back, so I don't want to loose anything I can carry. Whatever I don't carry I just leave where I'm staying and bring one or two for the trip. The idea is to have a good variety to keep myself busy.

I'm not too much into nature watching, but a book on the Incan culture would be pretty good, I only have one and it's too big to bring. I'd have to go to the library tomorrow to find a more concise one.

Oh, and a bible or something would be no problem since the vast majority of south america along with my family is catholic and I am one, too. And I don't think it would be a problem if I brought a copy of the bhagavad gita or some other religious text, it would just be something to read, and I wouldn't be proselytizing or anything, just spending my time reading - but I definitely see how it can become a problem fast so I think I'll steer away from that direction like you said.

I'm not familiar with the authors you suggested, what type of literature do they write in, would you say?

And a library book IS kind of risky, even if it's a small one. I wouldn't want to loose it but I would have it back by the due date if I didn't.

And borrowing something is a great idea, my family is really big on academic education, my grandfather was a phD in Education, so I would have no problem finding challenging reading there. So many options, so little time.
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pitohui Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 09:28 PM
Response to Reply #19
33. heh heh i bet i'm WAY older than you
Edited on Fri Dec-05-08 09:30 PM by pitohui
in most parts of the world, w. the exception of bavaria, you can stay in so-called youth hostels pretty much until age death :-)

be that as it may, the authors i suggested are in the category of slipstream/SF/modern space opera -- there's SOOOO much bad science fiction out there that you have to be careful but there's also some really exceptional stuff out there and i tried to suggest a few -- the great thing about these books/authors is the density of material, even when you're lagged and tired of reading, you can stare out a dark airplane or bus window and just see the movie unwind of these futures

i will say -- an advantage of having so many stops where you stay w. family/friends is that they can have books waiting for you so you don't have to carry everything

my relatives live in japan so VERY difficult to order english language books, i'm aware they order from amazon and pay a premium, this MAY or MAY NOT be the case in peru, best thing to do is email in advance if possible and see if they have books they're willing to trade, or also it can be that they would like you to bring certain books

i usu. carry about (maximum) 12 books on a trip, with the first books i read on the long flight over being ones i can leave along the way -- since i can't carry a heavy bag, i usu. have one small checked bag and one carryon for a long trip, i carry my coat (to avoid checking it, and put 2-3 books just in the coat pocket) this keeps the weight of yr carry-on down -- read the shortest book first, why, because once you read it, you leave it, and that's an entire book left behind -- my strategy anyway

for my journal i carry those ernest hemingway books, shit, what are they called? they're tiny and you can't fill them in just a month, i know, i've tried...i'm looking at one right now but can't recall the name of it...they have them in barnes and noble...they have like 160 pages, they also have an envelope where you can hide a copy of your passport in case you lose it (which you won't but in case)

would love to visit peru and bolivia but as i would visit both on the same trip and i would need time to acclimate to the altitude, i'm hoping that obama will ease relations w. those nations and make it easier for me to get a longer term visa, so i'm holding out

when you get back, PLEASE post a trip report, it will be so cool to read your story
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 10:13 PM
Response to Reply #33
36. Definitely.
I got my sister to lend me a digital cam so I just have to get a power converter when I get there and I'll post some great pics. I'm also going to start a family website and stuff to stay in touch with that side of the family since have experience in that area, but that's another story.

I will have access to plenty of spanish language literature when I'm there so I'll take that into consideration. Maybe I can borrow somebody's copy of Garcilaso de la Vega's account of the Inca culture. It's really tough finding English translations of his stuff.

I"m really worrying about the altitude issue. I suffer from a little asthma and don't have much albuterol left and I can't get a prescription before then. I figure can pick one up when I'm down there since pharmacies are more lax. Also, I'm not in the best of shape, I used to run miles and such but I've been pretty sedentary for about three years, I think I might have to rent an oxygen tank or something when I get to Cusco.

I have some good science fiction and horror on the shelf, I'm thinking of bringing along Dune or H.P. Lovecraft for fun. I've already read them a few times but it would be good familiar reading and I always get more with rereads.

I've got a small pocket size notepad from barnes and nobles or borders or something, I'll using it when I can't carry a spiral notebook along and to mark addresses and other need to know stuff.

The idea of copying my passport never even occurred to me. Holy shit. I have to do that tomorrow. Last time I went when I was 18 I got pick-pocketed while standing in a moving bus. Never noticed a damn thing and it was horrible because I was on my way to the U.S. embassy to register or check-in or whatever I was supposed to do. I eventually had the passport wallet returned by some woman who just followed the directions to an address I had left on a paper in the booklet. All the money, about $20, was gone but all of my paperwork was still there. I thanked God, and gave the lady some money, though not too much since she could easily have just been a part of the scheme and trying to gain further payment, or at least that's how it was explained to me by my family that lives there.

Good idea about the coat. Although it's summer time there it will probably be cold and rainy in the mountains. I have an old army field jacket with huge pockets. I'll stuff those with what I can't fit into the luggage.
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buzzycrumbhunger Donating Member (793 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:13 PM
Response to Original message
18. I would rethink the book angle
I have a friend (read HER book!) who loves the feel of real books, but now swears by her e-book reader. The downside is that they're nowhere near standardizing the formats and you need to pick one that allows you to DL as many formats as possible, uses e-ink so it's easy on the eyes, offers access to lots of titles, and won't steal your content back (meaning Kindle is out because the bastids at Amazon don't let you transfer the files to other devices even though you've paid for them). Bonus if it's wireless so you can DL new content from anywhere. Yes, they're expensive, but how else could you carry 200 books in your pocket (double that with a memory card)? Seems like a no-brainer for anyone who travels or commutes.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:32 PM
Response to Reply #18
21. That's sounds like the perfect idea.
If I had the money I would totally buy one of those; e-book readers, you say? I'm going with a limited budget, can't even afford to bring a digital camera with me, have to resort to those disposable ones. You have no idea how bummed I am about that. Or maybe an iphone with internet access, that would be suh-weet!

Alas, I'm limited in budget and to books alone. I'm not risking taking my laptop and the electirical plugs down there are different, I would have to fined a plug converter, fast. Also, the risk on that kind of thing is kinda bad, I don't want to get shanked just for my stupid gateway laptop, I don't care how much it cost me.
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pitohui Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 09:34 PM
Response to Reply #18
35. the poster is going to peru
it's like my last trip to africa, you know the VERY FIRST adventure i had after leaving south africa, a relatively first world nation?

yeah, my battery charger EXPLODED puff! in supposedly the very best fucking hotel in all of madagascar -- puff! boom! kablooey! i'm not saying peru is so primitive, it prob. isn't, but on the other hand i wouldn't want the hassle of dealing with anything "e" in the third/fourth world

don't do anything that involves electronics, or batteries, or complications

when traveling in the third or fourth world, and keep in mind parts of peru are really really poor...carry a book, not a laptop, carry a book, not an e-book reader!
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Ptah Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:49 PM
Response to Original message
22. I'll recommend three by Ivan Doig:
Bucking the Sun


Dancing at the Rascal Fair



This House of Sky

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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 08:12 PM
Response to Reply #22
25. These are historically inspired novels, right?
About family and human interaction set in the north american west? This is what I found from him:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Doig

Is this right? Can I ask why you would recommend these? I mean how do, or did, they make an impression on you? And why do you think they would be good reads to carry along? I only ask for more specifics because this is not one of the authors I have on my own shelves so I have to justify going downtown to the library to find them.
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Ptah Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 08:33 PM
Response to Reply #25
27. Yes, historically inspired.
I recommend them because of that description.

Dancing at the Rascal Fair is the one of the three that has
multi-continent content. That seemed to fit in with your plans.

Bucking the Sun centers on the construction of the Fort Peck Dam,
funded in the thirties by FDR.

This House of Sky is autobiographical.

The author, Ivan Doig, writes of his beginnings, just miles from where
my grandparents homesteaded, my parents farmed and ranched and raised us.
The locations he recreates are the places of my childhood. Even to
the detail of his college. My brother attended that university just seven years
after Mr. Doig.







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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 09:08 PM
Response to Reply #27
31. Ok, thank you.
I'm going to spend a few hours at the library tomorrow looking into a few ideas.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 07:50 PM
Response to Original message
23. More ideas, please help.
I've got a few good contenders I working around in my noodle but I need some more ideas and why they would be good for the ride. I have literally anything at my disposal in some way or another. I'm just limited by the media form - ink and paper publications.
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Aristus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 08:35 PM
Response to Original message
28. Here's a list for you:
The Seed And The Sower by Sir Laurence Van Der Post.
The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester.
An Edge In My Voice by Harlan Ellison.
Danse Macabre by Stephen King.
The Six Wives Of Henry VIII by Alison Weir.
Chickenhawk by Robert Mason.
30 Satires by Louis Lapham.
Tom Jones by Henry Fielding.

That's a pretty eclectic list there. Science fiction, pop culture criticism, social criticism, war biography, historical biography, essays, 18th Century comedy. That should keep you busy and well entertained.
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 09:07 PM
Response to Reply #28
30. I'll research those.
Only one of those authors I'm familiar with is Stephen King (I know, sad) and I don't have that particular novel of his but I'll look these up. Would you give me personal impressions of those books, just the ones that hit you the most and why, maybe? If it's not too much to ask, I do like picking others' brains for more information.
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Aristus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 09:18 PM
Response to Reply #30
32. The Seed And The Sower is my favorite book. It's a beautiful, haunting story about
two WWII POW's sharing Christmas together a few years after the end of the war. The film "Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence" was based loosely on this semi-autobiographical novel.

The Stars My Destination is widely considered one of the best science fiction novels ever written. Basically, it's "The Count Of Monte Christo" in outer space. Great read.

Danse Macabre isn't a novel; it's a non-fiction examination of the horror genre in print, radio, films and television from about the 1940's until about 1979, when the book was published. King writes non-fiction better than fiction, IMO.

An Edge In My Voice is a collection of columns from the Los Angeles Free Press written by Harlan Ellison, who mixes personal anecdotes with social commentary better than any other writer alive, with the possible exception of Gore Vidal.

The Six Wives Of Henry VIII is a terrific historical bio of some remarkable people in turbulent times.

30 Satires is a lucid, smart and very fun read that I picked up in a bargain bin in a bookstore in Victoria, B.C.

Tom Jones is flat-out the funniest novel I've ever read. The florid, effusive 18th Century prose-style enhances the comedy, instead of obscuring it.

Have fun!
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peruban Donating Member (888 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Dec-05-08 09:31 PM
Response to Reply #32
34. Thank you so much. n/t
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spindrifter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-06-08 07:06 PM
Response to Original message
41. A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
Why? Because it is interesting--but it's the longest single volume novel in print.
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Whoa_Nelly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-06-08 07:59 PM
Response to Original message
42. Anansi Boys
and anything Mark Twain

Also, relative to being in SA

Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors by Piers Paul



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bikebloke Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Dec-06-08 09:55 PM
Response to Original message
44. I took two books with me to Argentina.
I was only there for two weeks. They were popcorn reads. One was so bad I hurriedly read through it, just so I could give it away. But I was so busy with travelling, seeing new places and socializing with other travellers and locals, that my usual reading rate was significantly reduced. I never finished the second book until I was back home.

I even grabbed some free radio dramas off iTunes, but only listened to a couple.
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