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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:24 AM
Original message
Recommend a good book for my book club.
We've read the following books already:

Life of Pi
The Secret Life of Bees
The Yiddish Policeman's Union
A Spell for Chameleon
P.S. I love you
Wicked
1984

Any good suggestions? :hi:
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Whoa_Nelly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:27 AM
Response to Original message
1. Anansi Boys
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anansi_Boys

Loved it and will read it again!
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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:35 AM
Response to Reply #1
6. Thanks for the recommendation! (nt)
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AlCzervik Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:29 AM
Response to Original message
2. The Kite Runner
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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:32 AM
Response to Reply #2
4. I suggested that book, but it was thought that it would be too "dark."
I get it. None of the books we've read are all that heavy in material. I will read it myself eventually though. My mother-in-law already gave me a copy.
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AlCzervik Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:36 AM
Response to Reply #4
7. it is but very good. it feels like you've turned on the heavy when you read it.
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WindRavenX Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:30 AM
Response to Original message
3. The God of Small Things or Disgrace
Fantastic novels.
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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:42 AM
Response to Reply #3
9. Thanks for the rec! (nt)
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likesmountains 52 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 03:36 PM
Response to Reply #3
37. The God of Small Things is a favorite of mine too..
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Orrex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:32 AM
Response to Original message
5. A Spell for Chameleon?
Did you get to the part about the breasts yet? What about the part with the breasts?

And don't forget the breasts.


In the name of all that is literary, I forbid your book club to read anything else by Piers Anthony.
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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:41 AM
Response to Reply #5
8. Yes, there is something slightly misogynistic about Pier Anthony's writing.
It's all very fluffy and you know it will have a happy ending.


You want to know the worst part?




I enjoyed the book

:blush:
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Mz Pip Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:45 AM
Response to Original message
10. Plainsong
Wonderful book. One of the first times everyone in the book club agreed.
It's by Kent Haruf.

http://januarymagazine.com/fiction/plainsong.html

Mz Pip
:dem:
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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 12:46 AM
Response to Reply #10
11. I'll look into it!
:hi:
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Beausoir Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 03:48 AM
Response to Reply #10
21. Haruf is a wonderful author!
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nadine_mn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:02 AM
Response to Original message
12. Church of the Dead Girls
Forget the lurid title
Its how the town turns on itself that is so fascinating
here is a snippet of the plot
Serial killers populate much of contemporary fiction, but few authors use the serial killer theme the way Stephen Dobyns does in The Church of Dead Girls.

In Aurelius, a fictional small town in upstate New York, young girls begin to disappear. Through the eyes of an unnamed first person narrator, who's fiftyish and a biology teacher at the local high school, we watch as paranoia, and then vigilante justice, set in as the town seeks a scapegoat.

Of course, the first horror is that a peaceful, idyllic town could harbor such a fiend: "Nobody looked at this person and thought, Monster. Perhaps this was the most disturbing aspect of the business: that the person, on the surface at least, never seemed extraordinary, or none of us had the wit to identify the signs. What would those signs have been? Wouldn't evil or monstrosity call attention to itself?" (4).

True to human nature, the people of Aurelius begin the search for the evil one in their midst by singling out anyone who's different in any way: a member of an ethnic, political, or religious minority; or an outsider, someone who's come to town only lately. Once the vigilantes begin to terrorize the citizenry, the introspective, reclusive narrator analyzes their behavior: "They could justify their actions by calling them reactions. They could do something terrible and call it punishment or revenge or retribution, but it was still terrible. Their inner temptations were transformed into overt behavior and they, too, came to share the characteristics of the monster" (121).


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nadine_mn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:04 AM
Response to Original message
13. True Notebooks Mark Salzman
Its about a journalist who teaches a writing class to LA juvenile deliquents....it is very good and not all hollywood-ish with happy endings
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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:08 AM
Response to Reply #13
14. Thank you! (nt)
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Solon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:19 AM
Response to Original message
15. Urban Shaman by C. E. Murphy
Also Thunderbird Falls, and Coyote Dreams, by the same author.

For some lighthearted fun, try Pyramid Scheme by Eric Flint and Dave Freer. Another would be "The Infinite Plan" by Isabel Allende. Yes, before you ask, she is the niece of the former president of Chile.
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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:20 AM
Response to Reply #15
16. Thanks! (nt)
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Solon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:27 AM
Response to Reply #16
19. Just a note on the C. E. Murphy books...
They are a series, so I advise that you read them in order:

1. Urban Shaman

2. Thunderbird Falls

3. Coyote Dreams

I found the writing to be refreshingly witty and humorous, she's a new author, and I feel that her writing is really good, and the stories seem interesting.
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TorchTheWitch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:22 AM
Response to Original message
17. Here's some really good ones...

Into Thin Air :: by Jon Krakauer
Without Remorse :: by Tom Clancy
The Partner :: by John Grisham
The Charm School :: by Nelson DeMille
The General's Daughter :: by Nelson DeMille
The Caine Mutiny :: by Herman Wouk
Eye of the Needle :: by Ken Follett
Lie Down with Lions :: by Ken Follett
Pillars of the Earth :: by Ken Follett
A Thief of Time :: by Tony Hillerman
Dune :: by Frank Herbert
Absolute Power :: by David Baldacci
Day of the Jackal :: by Frederick Forsyth


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suzbaby Donating Member (906 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:23 AM
Response to Reply #17
18. That's quite a list! Thanks! (nt)
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Forkboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:07 PM
Response to Reply #17
44. Any Forsyth book is worth the time.
I loved The Negotiator, but they're all great. Day of the Jackal is a classic in the genre (and the influence for a lot of what came after).
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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:13 PM
Response to Reply #17
46. Eye of the Needle scared the bejabbers out of me.
Ha! It's been eons since I read it, and I still can feel the goosebumps.
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pokerfan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 03:38 AM
Response to Original message
20. "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character



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Robeson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 03:51 AM
Response to Original message
22. A nice little book I just finished by Maureen F. McHugh....
...called "Half the Day Is Night". Good character development and a tight story. It would be a good book for discussion in a book club.
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Whisp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 05:20 AM
Response to Original message
23. Sexing The Cherry, Jeanette Winterson.
short magical imaginative read.

Geek Love is quite the different too, Katherine Dunn.

and The Poison Bible by Barbara Kingsolver.
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YankeyMCC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 05:54 AM
Response to Original message
24. Mayflower by Nathaniel Philbrick
Divided Ground by Alan Taylor
Last Days of the Incas by Kim MacQuarrie

Those are non-fiction but they are all well told stories.

For Fiction:
"Learning the World" by Ken Macleod (It's science fiction but is so well done I don't hesitate to suggest it to no SF readers, and it's not very long)

If the group does like Science Fiction and is up to taking on a large Tome: "River of Gods" by Ian McDonald - 900 pages I think and I didn't think I would make it, I hesitated a long time over starting this but once I did the story just carried me a long and the length only became and issue when I was sorry I came to the end of the story much sooner than I expected when I picked up the book.
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peacefreak Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 06:58 AM
Response to Original message
25. Samurai's Garden by Gail Tsukiyama
Last Days of Dogtown by Anita Diament
Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls
Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell
Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stenger
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Bzzzz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 06:59 AM
Response to Original message
26. Zero...n/t
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Orsino Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 07:09 AM
Response to Original message
27. Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson
Pulitzer winner, and rightly so.
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Critters2 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-18-07 02:19 PM
Response to Reply #27
58. I second this rec!!
It was the first book my club read, and a great way to start out!
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Perry Logan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 07:57 AM
Response to Original message
28. Humboldt's Gift, by Saul Bellow
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SKKY Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 07:59 AM
Response to Original message
29. "The Alienist" by Caleb Carr or...
..."Dirty White Boys" by Stephen Hunter. Both are fantastic, but if I had to chose just one, it would be "The Alienist".
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yellowdogintexas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 04:00 PM
Response to Reply #29
38. "The Alienist" is fantastic, as is the sequel, "Angel of Darkness"
and of course the parody "Shroud of the Thwacker"
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mitchum Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 08:50 AM
Response to Original message
30. "Last Exit To Brooklyn"...heartwarming tales of life in the 50s
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Starbucks Anarchist Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 03:33 PM
Response to Reply #30
36. That one's on my to-read list.
I actually found a copy, literally, on the ground. There were a bunch of books on the pavement next to the subway stop with a "free" sign attached.

I recognized Selby's name and picked it up. :D
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mitchum Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 05:31 PM
Response to Reply #36
40. In my opinion, it is the best post-war novel...
it is truly an astonishing work
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RetroLounge Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 09:00 AM
Response to Original message
31. Based on my recent reads (and re-reads)
Refresh, Refresh by Benjamin Percy
Truck, a love story by Michael Perry
The Time Traveller's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
Diving Mr. Albert by Michael Paterniti
Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison
The Pilot's Wife by Anita Shreve
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

:hi:

RL
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Fire Walk With Me Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:28 PM
Response to Original message
32. The Crying of Lot 49.
Edited on Sat Nov-17-07 01:38 PM by Peake
Thomas Pynchon.

Edit: "None of the books we've read are all that heavy in material."

Cancel this one then.

I'll second "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" as a great read.
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Kutjara Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:37 PM
Response to Reply #32
35. And don't forget his new one:
Against the Day.

I just finished it. It's brilliant.
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LostInAnomie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:34 PM
Response to Original message
33. In Dubious Battle
In my opinion it is Steinbeck's second best book and deserves far more recognition.

One selling point is that it has an ending that you will never see coming.
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JVS Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 01:37 PM
Response to Original message
34. A Confederacy of Dunces
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yellowdogintexas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 04:03 PM
Response to Original message
39. "Ragtime"..one of the BEst.Books.Ever.
Edited on Sat Nov-17-07 04:03 PM by yellowdogintexas
"#1 Ladies' Detective Agency" **

"A Game of Thrones" **

** warning: reading of either of these books may lead to addictive serial searching until you have finished the list

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WCGreen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:31 PM
Response to Reply #39
51. I just read Ragtime....
Great book...
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Bossy Monkey Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 06:31 PM
Response to Original message
41. Just finished "Teacher Man" by Frank McCourt. Highly recommended
unless nobody's read "Angela's Ashes" in which case that is even more highly recommended.
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wain Donating Member (803 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 07:48 PM
Response to Original message
42. Two Old Women
You will love it and it's a quick read.
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wain Donating Member (803 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 07:50 PM
Response to Original message
43. Never Let me Go
Different, very different. A good read.
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Forkboy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:10 PM
Response to Original message
45. The same one I always recommend...The Years Of Rice And Salt by Kim Stanley Robinson.
Edited on Sat Nov-17-07 10:12 PM by Forkboy
The book is set between about AD 1405 (783 solar years since the Hegira, by the Islamic calendar used in the book), and AD 2002 (1423 after Hegira). In the eighth Islamic century, almost 99 per cent of the population of medieval Europe is wiped out by the Black Death (rather than the approximately 30-60% that died in reality). This sets the stage for a world without Christianity as a major influence.

The novel follows a jāti of three to seven main characters and their reincarnation through time, in very different cultural and religious settings. The book features Muslim, Chinese (Buddhist, Daoist, Confucianist), American First Nations, and Hindu culture, philosophy and everyday life. It mixes sophisticated knowledge about these cultures in the real world with fictional developments, partly resembling the actual history, but shifted and reflected by different cultural settings.

The main characters, marked by identical first letters throughout their reincarnations, but changing in gender, culture-nationality and so on, struggle for progress in each life. Each chapter has a different style, reflecting its setting.

Key issues of the novel are hybrid cultures; Progress and science; alternate history; philosophy, religion and human nature; politics; feminism and equality of all humans; and the struggle between technology and sustainability.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Years_of_Rice_and_Salt



I got so much out of this book and have read it twice in the last few years, with plans to read it again.
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rug Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:22 PM
Response to Original message
47. Salt: A World History
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grasswire Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:23 PM
Response to Original message
48. are you reading for fun?
I picked up a book at a tag sale that was quite amusing: "Cold Sassy Tree" by Olive Ann Burns.

WashPost said: "Rich with emotion, humor and tenderness...A novel about an old man growing young, a young man growing up, and the modern age coming to a small southern town."

San Jose Mercury News: "It's a winner, it rings with authority, it moves fast, and its use of language is as surefooted and convincing as any in 'The Color Purple'."


Oh, and what's that book about earning your way through college? That was HILARIOUS. Here it is: http://www.amazon.com/How-Paid-College-Friendship-Music... How I Paid for College: a Novel of Sex, Theft, Friendship and Musical Theater by Marc Acito. (Not for cultural conservatives.)
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femmocrat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:25 PM
Response to Original message
49. Thirteen Moons. Fascinating book.
Even better than Cold Mountain, IMO.
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Tyler Durden Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:30 PM
Response to Original message
50. Love in the time of Cholera.
Don't know anything about the film but I just bought the book for SO.

Read it years back. Amazingly good.
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WCGreen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:34 PM
Response to Original message
52. An interesting book to read is the Fortress of Solitude....
A very densely written novel about coming of age in Brooklyn during the run up to Rudy...

Written by Jonathan Lethem, it's so wonderfully written that I would have to say it is one of the best books I have ever read...

I really enjoyed the Yiddish Policeman's Union and the Fortress of Solitude is like Chabon, only a denser, if there is such a word...
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bigwillq Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Nov-17-07 10:35 PM
Response to Original message
53. Point of Entry
http://www.amazon.com/Point-Entry-Novel-Peter-Schechter...


It is a fluff book but has great insight to some current events. A good read.
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hippywife Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-18-07 02:00 PM
Response to Original message
54. This was a very excellent read:
Jon Katz: The Dogs of Bedlam Farm: An Adventure with Sixteen Sheep, Three Dogs, Two Donkeys, and Me.
http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Bedlam-Farm-Adventure-Sixtee...

I heard him interviewed on the Diane Rehm Show on NPR one day and got the book. I read parts of it aloud to my husband while we were on a camping trip. Some of it was funny, some touching, all of it interesting!

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greymattermom Donating Member (680 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-18-07 02:03 PM
Response to Original message
55. Echo Maker
The Echo Maker by Richard Powers.
A story of brain damage that makes us question who we are.
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graywarrior Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-18-07 02:08 PM
Response to Original message
56. A Trout in the Sea of Cortez
One of the best books I've read in a long, long time.

http://www.amazon.com/Trout-Sea-Cortez-John-Salter/dp/1...
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Richardo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-18-07 02:11 PM
Response to Original message
57. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
Edited on Sun Nov-18-07 02:12 PM by Richardo
An autistic 15-year-old with a fondness for Sherlock Holmes looks for the killer of a neighbor's dog and starts on a journey that reveals that, and a lot more about himself, his family and neighbors.

Haddon has an amazing ability to get you inside the thought processes of an autistic child. Funny and poignant, and a fast read.
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RebelSansCause Donating Member (304 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-18-07 02:36 PM
Response to Original message
59. Godel, Escher, Bach...just finished it thought if that is too heavy duty for you i suggest
Catch-22. always been one of if not my favorite book of all time. failing that i would say go wuthering heights. if not, well then frankenstein is AMAZING, shelley is quite ambitious and you can talk about things such as genetic engineering. failing THAT well then you need to meet new people to read books with.
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