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Cancer in Dogs question (Rosco again)

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Gidney N Cloyd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 08:26 PM
Original message
Cancer in Dogs question (Rosco again)
I posted several days ago about my yellow lab Rosco having surgery to remove a spinal growth that might be making his back legs suddenly lame. I appreciate everyone's good wishes and prayers at that time.
The pathology reports are trickling in and I just now got word his elbow, the original problem before the legs went out, is positive for histiocytic sarcoma; and while the spinal growth is still finishing testing, it's consistent so far with that (histiocytic sarcoma).

So...

Can anyone shed any light on that type of cancer?

Also, does anyone know anything about nutritional treatments like Glycomannan (sp.?)
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Gidney N Cloyd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 09:01 PM
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1. kick
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IndyBob Donating Member (216 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 10:21 PM
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2. Not histiocytic sarcoma,
But I had a dog several years ago that had lymphoma. Chico was 5 when he was diagnosed.

Is your vet decent? What does he say about the diet? I would think it wouldn't hurt, as long as it is balanced. I always worried about weight loss, etc.

Chico went through chemo - twice. The first time was quite remarkable. Within 2-3 weeks, the tumors shrank - they had gotten bad enough to pinch the optic nerve and make him blind. When the tumor shrank, he regained his sight. He got his appetite back, and got back to his usual weight. He resumed playing, basically back to being a happy dog. He remained healthy for almost 12 months.

After the second round of chemo, he was fine for 6 months.

The vet was very good, he did the chemo himself. I would be scheduled to be the last of the day so he could take his time. None of the visits lasted more than 2 hours, and Chico and I always went home afterwords. Kept costs way done too.

The dog tolerated the chemo very well, never got sick or lost hair. He got a good year and a half of health, I got a year and a half of good companionship.

Give Rosco a gentle hug for me.

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NewWaveChick1981 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 10:25 PM
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3. I have had two dogs with two different types of cancer.
It's been a few years since they died (one died in 1998 and the other died in 2000), so I don't remember the names of the cancers, but I do know one was blood-borne and the other was in the form of a tumor. As you know, depending on the type of cancer, survival rates can be medium to high. With our dog Diana (lab/border collie mix), the blood-borne cancer was not treatable since it was so aggressive, but when our Boston Terrier/lab mix Kara got liver cancer, she lived three more years after treatment.

I hope some other DUers can offer you advice, but I can only offer you my good vibes and hugs. :hug: :pals: I hope for the best for you and Rosco. :D
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Kali Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 11:25 PM
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4. Not a good diagnosis, sorry.
Especially if it is disseminated.

http://www.histiocytosis.ucdavis.edu/sarcoma.html (pretty technical and graphic photos)
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Gidney N Cloyd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 10:00 AM
Response to Reply #4
6. The surgeon didn't seem too hopeful but then oddly ( I thought) he
wanted me to look into the nutritional approach. I will do that but it just struck me like the laetril fad back in the 80's. He even said not to mention it to the oncologists if I decide to consult with them.
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barb162 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Oct-12-06 11:33 PM
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5.  try this link
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/CanineCancer /

I find these people are pretty knowledgeable
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DancingBear Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 10:14 AM
Response to Original message
7. Please PM me regarding this
We have a Newfoundland who was diagnosed with cancer on his mandible/jaw, extending into the cranial cavity. The worst, most aggressive type. Surgery to remove it was not even considered.

After the results were in , the vet gave us pills to ease his pain and told us point blank he wouldn't live two months (he was 5 years old at the time).

From a friend, we got the name of an "alternative" vet - she put him on a no carb diet, supplemented with fish oil, Hoxsey, canine multi-vitamins, and a few other supplements.

He has lost 15 pounds, runs like a pup, and of this date (7 months AFTER his supposed final day on earth) is still with us.

The cancer has not shrunk in size (at least externally) and we don't know how long he'll be around, but it is the best money we have even spent.

I'll give you names, phone numbers, etc. if you'd like. Our vet is in Virginia, but she may know of other similar vet practices in other parts of the country.
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xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 10:22 AM
Response to Original message
8. some information.
http://www.histiocytosis.ucdavis.edu/sarcoma.html

Histiocytic Sarcoma and Malignant Histiocytosis. The histiocytic sarcoma (HS) complex encompasses a number of distinctive clinical entities which will be described below. Some definitions are in order, and reflect the preferred nomenclature of the writing group of the Histiocyte Society. Histiocytic neoplasia which originates at a single site is called histiocytic sarcoma. This form of histiocytic sarcoma, which is often encountered on the extremities, has the best prognosis if treated early by surgical excision or by amputation of a limb. When spread to distant sites beyond the local lymph node occurs, the disease is then termed disseminated histiocytic sarcoma; this is more likely to occur unnoticed when primary lesions occur in cryptic sites (eg spleen, lung, and bone marrow). This latter form of HS is most like malignant histiocytosis (MH). MH is an aggressive, histiocytic neoplasm which arises in multiple sites simultaneously. Most lesions previously defined as MH are probably more correctly termed disseminated HS. The occurrence of true MH is difficult to establish because the lesions often occur in cryptic sites, and the existence of histiocytic neoplasia is only recognized after clinical signs have appeared and disease progression is advanced. HS and MH are capable of widespread metastasis, hence in time the 2 syndromes merge clinically and it is not always possible to differentiate true multicentric origin (MH) from widespread metastasis of disseminated HS. Also, it is never possible to know exactly how long the disease process has been operative. Hence, the perception is that both disseminated HS and MH follow a rapid clinical progression despite therapeutic intervention. This is certainly true once clinical signs are apparent, but the subclinical period is of unknown duration.
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xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 10:26 AM
Response to Original message
9. my dog sport and i had cancer at the same time.
i had skin cancer -- and he had a sarcoma of some sort under the skin.

i went through chemo -- and i made sport go through it as well.

six days of treatment -- i would take him in in the morning and pick him up in the late afternoon.
i was sick, sick, sick -- he was fine -- but PISSED and PISSY.
he was eleven at the time and didn't appreciate being left at the dr's .

he lived to be over fifteen. best thing i ever did.
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Gidney N Cloyd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 10:39 AM
Response to Reply #9
10. Glad Sport got some benefit from the chemo.
The problem, I'm told, is that this specific histiocytic sarcoma isn't as responsive to treatment as many other types. If you recall the type of sarcoma your dog had, could you PM me?
Thanks.
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xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Oct-13-06 10:49 AM
Response to Reply #10
11. i'll try to think.
i just wanted you to know that there are good stories out there for people and their companions where dramatic and difficult treatment may lay ahead.

i'm vibing all the best for you and rosco.
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