Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

New Job Teaching...Hate it...Am I Stupid to want to quit after 1 month?

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » The DU Lounge Donate to DU
 
masmdu Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 09:04 PM
Original message
New Job Teaching...Hate it...Am I Stupid to want to quit after 1 month?
Just started teaching 6th grade social studies as a lateral entery teacher (not trained as a teacher but willing to get my training as I work).

I thought I would like the job. I don't. I find most of my time is dealing with behavior problems that are non-stop and drain any enthusiasm I have for the subject.

Am I stupid to walk out the door? Jobs ain't a dime a dozen and I have no other immediate prospects, two small children and a wife to consider.

Any thoughts or advice would be truly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
MichiganVote Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 09:08 PM
Response to Original message
1. Pick who you think is the best teacher in the school and ask them to
mentor you. They will counsel you on how to relate to your students and how to handle the beh. problems. 6th graders commonly start all brave and bad but they also mature as the year goes on.

Get some help from your colleagues.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
wildhorses Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 09:11 PM
Response to Original message
2. OMG sixth graders are the worst....
the hormones are kicking in...follow the adivce above and good luck and NO I don't adivce walking out....looking for employment while employed is easier than finding a job being unemployed...


why is that :shrug:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
hotforteacher Donating Member (296 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 09:20 PM
Response to Original message
3. Dude, teaching is hard work...
You would most likely be having troubles with 6th graders during the first five weeks anyway.

A word of advice: don't pack it up yet. It usually takes about two months to really instill a sense of trust in the classroom and since you are fresh meat, it ain't gonna be easy. Make sure that you have a very simple, yet solid, behavior plan that your admin will back up. Two strike systems are usually quite enough. First warning after an infraction is a verbal explanation followed up with the consequence for repeating said behavior. Make sure that you are keeping your clipboard on hand with the seating chart so that names are right in front of you and you can make a tick next to the infractors name.

Honestly, if you already have repeat offenders, have them call their parent in front of you and the class, or take the time after class to call the parent and explain the "difficulties" the child is having and quickly explain what your behavior plan is (whether that be a write up and a visit to their AP after the second strike, or whatever). You have to hammer down hard at first to get rid of behaviors and parents can be your best ally.

The best behavior plan is shit without consistency. I work in an inner-city high school and they all know that I am badass about making shit happen quickly when behaviors are out of line. Never argue or engage with a student--that NEVER gets you anywhere. Behavior, consequence, conversation's over. Clear expectations are the way to go.

Oh yeah, and never show fear. They smell it.

You can totally do this. You're the adult. I have worked with the "worst" children imaginable and saved all of my initial nervous breakdowns for after they leave. Contact your AP and principal and seek out the help you deserve. Knock on every door and let them know you're struggling and request assistance. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions or desire clarification.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
kwassa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 07:57 AM
Response to Reply #3
12. Excellent advice, all of it.
Kids actually love structure and discipline, as you are putting order into chaotic lives. Consistency is key, and it takes time to build a program.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
femmocrat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 09:28 PM
Response to Original message
4. I never heard of a "lateral entry" teacher....but
I really don't support OJT for teachers. If you are really serious about teaching, I recommend going back to college and getting your certification first. For example, you would have had courses in classroom management and had more experience in pre- and practice teaching before being thrown to the sharks. It is foolish to think someone can walk in off the street and begin teaching without the proper professional training.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
kwassa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 07:55 AM
Response to Reply #4
11. Most teacher training doesn't offer class management courses.
The dirty sin of the teacher training system, and the biggest complaint of new teachers. Plenty of the latest ed theories, no practical management. I learned from other teachers.

The best is if there is a school-wide system of classroom management, but few places do it.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
livetohike Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 08:30 AM
Response to Reply #11
15. You're right. But you must take child psychology and child development
and teacher training courses to get yourself organized. Also, modeling from your student teaching experiences.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
kwassa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 09:16 AM
Response to Reply #15
16. My teacher training had neither of these.
student teaching is helpful, and the educational theory classes were, as well.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
LostinVA Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 08:23 AM
Response to Reply #4
13. I have several friends who teach, and not Bone ever had a class
Edited on Wed Oct-11-06 08:24 AM by LostinVA
like this. They all decry how you're taught all the theories, but very, very little hands on stuff.

And, lateral-entry teachers do just as well or BETTER than newbie teachers right out of school. I think alternate licensure programs are great.

on edit:: From what my Friends have told me, MOST of teachers' training is OJT... that's just the way it is.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
livetohike Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 09:21 AM
Response to Reply #13
17. I received my training in the early 70's so maybe things
Edited on Wed Oct-11-06 09:24 AM by livetohike
are different today. I attended a state university known for it's teacher training. I have also had student teachers working in my classroom who were going to graduate from schools known for their teacher training.

I have a friend (my age) who went through a licensure program and he is teaching High School,in his second year and really struggling with it. I don't know the specifics of what courses he may have taken.

Edit: When you are alone in the classroom, who do you receive OJT from? It's not like having a mentor in the cube next to you. I taught for nine years and received little input except when the district coordinator came around twice a year, or the mandatory observations when I was a beginning teacher.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
ChoralScholar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 09:47 PM
Response to Original message
5. Hey man... don't take this the wrong way
This is why I don't support alternative licensure programs. You went into the classroom with the content knowledge, but not the tools on how to operate your classroom. Granted, you don't learn how to teach in college... but you have a few more tools at your disposal.

I suggest you take a Classroom Management class ASAP. There are ways you can go about your class, that you don't get bogged down with the disruptive kids.

As for this year - don't be afraid to blaze your own trail... figure out what works - and make it work for you.

Other advice - plan, plan, plan, and plan some more. If the kids sense you are pulling things out of your ass, they WILL pounce. It is their nature. Look like you know exactly what you are doing - even when you don't.

I'll be glad to talk more about it if you'd like. I've gone into two very tough discipline situations, and was very successful in both. I'd be glad to share my experience with you.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Scout1071 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 10:25 PM
Response to Original message
6. First rule of wing walking....don't let go till you've got something else
to hold on to.

Find a new job first. Otherwise, the advice above about talking with a teacher you admire is a good idea.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Whoa_Nelly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 10:49 PM
Response to Original message
7. What types of behavior problems?
PM me if you want. Am a retired teacher and have lots of ideas and helpful input.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
greenbriar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Oct-09-06 10:51 PM
Response to Original message
8. PM me...I teach 7th social studies and know what you speak of
I can give you some pointers and material to be interactive and help with the behavior.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
masmdu Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 07:45 AM
Response to Original message
9. Thanks...I have just resigned...and it feels like the right move
Now on to things I enjoy doing.

Thanks for the feedback, it helped.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
zanne Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 07:50 AM
Response to Original message
10. I taught Junior High for six years...
I also hated it, but I kept expecting it to get miraculously better somehow. I thought that with experience, a different attitude and good teachers to guide me, I'd settle right in. When I look back, I'm very proud of myself for lasting six years. I'm sorry if this isn't what you want to hear, but I'd advise you to leave the profession before it breaks your heart.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
livetohike Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-11-06 08:28 AM
Response to Original message
14. Do yourself and the kids a favor and quit now
You either love the process of teaching or you don't. You need some basic courses in teaching and child psychology. It is not on the job training. You have to establish classroom management on the first day or you will struggle with discipline problems all year long. There are techniques for this and it doesn't happen by osmosis.

I left teaching after nine years when I realized I was starting to fall into the category of not loving it anymore. Sadly, I worked with many teachers over the years who should have retired/quit years before.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Thu Aug 21st 2014, 03:06 PM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » The DU Lounge Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC