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Another vicious dog breed that really needs to be banned!

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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:35 AM
Original message
Another vicious dog breed that really needs to be banned!
It gets me so angry that people don't take the threat of this breed seriously. This breed is obsessive and persistent. Worst of all, because the dog doesn't look threatening, it "fools" lots of strangers into walking up to it to pet it.

Yes, I'm talking about Attack Golden Retrievers. They may look like they have a goofy smile most of the time:



But get between any one of them and its tennis ball, and you get the nasty snarl of a wolf-like wild animal ready to attack:

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Xenotime Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:37 AM
Response to Original message
1. Is this a serious thread?
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Make7 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:41 AM
Response to Reply #1
28. It's spelled "threat". ( n/t )
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:16 PM
Response to Reply #1
57. It's a hugh, series threat! nt
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calico1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:39 AM
Response to Original message
2. Golden Retrievers are very scary!
:scared:

Almost as scary as:



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JHH Donating Member (265 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:39 AM
Response to Original message
3. It is time for a preemptive strike on Attack Golden Retrievers
it is clear that they were the true cause of 9/11
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reichstag911 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:38 AM
Response to Reply #3
27. Bullshit.
It wasn't the Saudis (or the Goldens); it was the schnauzers



with help from some other breeds that hate America.

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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:03 AM
Response to Reply #27
35. What a menacing lineup!
I just know that beagle has death and destruction on his mind!

And why do you think they call them "terriers"? It's code for terrorists!
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reichstag911 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 12:41 PM
Response to Reply #35
49. I believe it was a Bush ancestor...
Edited on Thu Aug-03-06 12:41 PM by reichstag911
...with a severe speech impediment -- no doubt from an excess of mead and the resulting destruction of brain cells -- who originally named that group of dogs "terriers," instead of the intended (and correct) "terrorists."

And the beagle's a she-devil; the others are manly men (except for the fact that the cockapoo and the Mal-Tzu have no nuts, that is).
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:39 AM
Response to Original message
4. Is that your doggie?
Beautiful and such nice white teeth. I have one and I know that getting between her and a chew bone is one of the most dangerous things a person can do. Also add their tails, weapons of mass destruction on your coffee table! Yes, dangerous animals if in the wrong hands.
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:43 AM
Response to Reply #4
7. Yes, but I'm certified
Yes, that's mine, but I'm a certified Attack Golden Retriever trainer!

You said getting between an Attack Golden Retriever and a chew bone is dangerous. I agree! And it's impossible to NOT get between the dog and the toy because the dog is always plopping the toy in someone's lap as a "gift". How demonically clever!

And don't get me started on tails and coffee tables.
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sui generis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:01 AM
Response to Reply #4
20. I have two huntresses.
Jazz "You have angered me. I must piddle on something" Kat and

KatZilla, A.K.A. Chinook, A.K.A. FatKat, A.K.A. M. Butterfat (arias by F.Atsokatso).

Her motto is "You have angered me. Whatever."

They despise each other, to the death. After four years, the only thing they have learned is

fighting LOUDLY is banned. It's okay to try to chew the other bitches ear off while she's trying to disembowel you as long as you do it V-E-R-Y Q-U-I-E-T-L-Y.

Tinkerbell, or "Bell" for short, my vietnamese potbellied chihuahua pig, has a luxury den she must sleep in. I call it "Bell-catraz". I think her ancestors are from Bell Salvador. She three sisters are Taco Bell, Burrito Bell, and her slightly corpulescent sister, Chimichonga Bell. Miss Bell once had a job working as a toll booth operator, I don't remember For Whom the Bell Tolled, but it only lasted one day. She's related to Bella Lugosi, the vampire chihuahua nosferatu.

(oh lord I can't stop, somebody help me!)

Adam and Eve actually only had one kid, and his pet chihuahua, Cain and a Bell (aaaaaaah!)

:hide:
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xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:04 AM
Response to Reply #20
36. oh. my. god.
for whom the Bell tolls! hysterical!
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mopinko Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:40 AM
Response to Original message
5. seriously, tho
my nephew was, at age 4, mauled by a golden retriever. he was in a home day care, and had known the dog for a year. perfectly sweet dog. one day it just took a big ole bite out of his face.
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:45 AM
Response to Reply #5
9. Seriously
My vet says that in all his years of practice, he only met one vicious golden. OTOH, I have met a few badly socialized goldens in the park. I think its a decline in folks basic understanding of animals, including goldens, as animals, and not as children in fur coats.

Sorry to hear about that experience.
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mopinko Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:54 AM
Response to Reply #9
16. no. i was just trying to make a point.
all these pit bull threads bug me, as well. i have a dog that is on some people's list of dogs that should be banned- a boxer. i see rotts on a lot of lists, too. although it is possible to train a boxer for attack work, you have to go back to germany to even find those temperament lines, and you have to start with them as puppies. they are bred to be even tempered family pets. pretty much same with rotts. there are a few bad ones out there. and a reputable breeder would make sure they go to the right person. it is really not that hard to test an individual dog's temperament.
people who fight dogs whould be hung by their toenails.
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lukasahero Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:44 AM
Response to Reply #16
30. These threads bug me too and thanks for making the point
The only dog that ever bit me was a Daschund. Seriously. Missed my eye by an inch. 7 stitches. We also came to own an aggressive and mean Mini Schnauzer. He was not raised well.

Hmmm... "He was not raised well." I think I might be on to something here.

As I said in another thread, I'm becoming more and more convinced that people should have to take dog owner lessons just like driving lessons. Can't pass the test? Can't have a dog.

PS - I LOVE boxers!
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KurtNYC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 05:07 PM
Response to Reply #16
69. The issue with Pitts is not biting
It is killing. 25% of fatalities are caused by one breed.

Dog bites run the gamut from barely putting their teeth on you (which can mean 'hey pet me some more') to slightly more pressure ( a warning / correction ) to bite your neck and rip it open (which means they want to kill you and if they are strong enough, they will).

Just to be clear, I don't advocate banning any breed but I think the argument that every dog bite is equal is misinformed.
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calico1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:50 AM
Response to Reply #5
10. I don't know what happened in this case of
course. But children tend to be bitten by dogs more because they don't know how to behave properly...they aren't taught. They will do things like pull the dog's tail or ears, or try to ride it like a horse, or stare at the dog directly in the eyes. Since a child is at eye level they usually will look more directly at the dog than an adult standing farther above. Many behaviors that we would consider harmless or cute are threatening behaviors to a dog. I am NOT saying this is what your nephew did. But I have seen kids display this kind of behavior toward dogs. I have to watch out for my own step granddaughter because she will run after my cats and try to pull their tails, pick them up. She hit one the other day and laughed. I corrected her and told her not to do it again. Kids often don't know. They often treat animals like they are toys. And then the animal ends up getting blamed. Of course there are vicious animals.... not saying its always the kid's fault.
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mopinko Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:03 AM
Response to Reply #10
21. this was a sweet kid
although, you do not ever really know what they are doing behind your back. but he was basically a very sweet little boy. he's a young man, now. (and going to college, in part, on the moeny he got from the insurance company.)
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nosillies Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 08:50 PM
Response to Reply #21
76. And it's not always kids
When I was in my late twenties, I was quite viciously attacked by a black lab, of all things!! I think it was because I made eye contact. And I blame the attack on the dog's owners, completely.
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Scout1071 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 08:46 PM
Response to Reply #5
74. My dad's golden bit a few people and had to be put down.
It happened later in his life, but he bit a child and an adult.
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xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:42 AM
Response to Original message
6. what a sweet baby! -- er attack baby! -- no that's not it --
oh i'm scared!

uh -- can i pet your attack retriever?
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:37 AM
Response to Reply #6
26. You may pet my Attack Golden
But first let me get my chains and muzzles. Even though he is trained to attack only when I hold his cheeks back, these creatures are unpredictable.
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xchrom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:02 AM
Response to Reply #26
34. i swear to god and hope to die that i will be
appropriately happy -- er scared -- to pet your attack golden.

i promise.
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smirkymonkey Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 01:02 PM
Response to Reply #26
50. I was almost licked to death by one of those vicious creatures!
Seriously, that is one adorable dog! I love Goldens - they are such wonderful friends!
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sui generis Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 01:15 PM
Response to Reply #26
53. The only attack I've ever had, even from a mean doggie
is big wet sloppy dog smooch. I guess that makes me a dog person.

Go figure though, my parents used to have a house that was a short walk through the woods from the wolf habitat at the zoo and those mean ol' timber wolves - big old drooly babies. I have no idea why anyone would ever be scared of a real wolf in the wild.

Just the ones raised by stupid humans, maybe.

My neighbors across the alley have security dogs. The neighbors really really hate it when I just reach over and pet them, and the funny thing is the dogs run and growl and bark and sound really dangerous ferocious but meanwhile they're taking turns getting their ears scratched. :shrug:


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windlight Donating Member (337 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:44 AM
Response to Original message
8. I agree and would like to add
Jack Russell Terriers... My neighbor has one and it just barks so much and runs like a mad dog all the time... and it bites... ARGG..
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liberalmuse Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:51 AM
Response to Original message
11. I was attacked by a Golden Retriever once...
He ran up to me, opened his mouth, stuck out his tongue and slobbered all over my hand. It was awful! Now that is a cute (but very vicious-looking) doggie! :)
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Coyote_Bandit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:52 AM
Response to Original message
12. There are no bad dogs
but there are lots of bad dog owners - and more than a few dogs forced to live in inappropriate settings (e.g., large dogs in small apartments).

Beautiful golden you have there....
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mopinko Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:58 AM
Response to Reply #12
19. there are some bad dogs.
that's just silly to say. you are correct to put most of the blame on the owners. but what you are saying, basically, is that temperament in not genetic. that is absurd.
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Coyote_Bandit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:01 AM
Response to Reply #19
33. Temperament
Edited on Thu Aug-03-06 11:08 AM by Coyote_Bandit
is subject to training. But the dog must be provided the correct environment and trained from birth.

To say otherwise is to suggest, first, that there is no circumstance in which certain dogs can safely have contact with people. That suggests that, ultimately, their extinction is warranted. Who exactly is it that determines what dogs are and are not safe? Any dog can become aggressive given the right circumstances - as can most people. Second, suggesting that genetics are the determinant of dog behavior might likewise suggest that genetics also determine human behavior. The science is, after all, the same. And the implications of this are outright evil.

A correct environment is what is suitable for the dog and his temperament and that is not necessarily a nice suburban home with a small fenced yard. Some dogs require lots of space. Some dogs should not be around children. Some dogs should not live in hot or cold environments. Some dogs should never be baited or teased because doing so teaches them to be aggressive (the same is true incidentally of any domesticated bird). Some dogs must be able to dig or tunnel or swim or chase. Some dogs interact with people best if they are isolated from other dogs. A dog is not a bad dog just because his temperament is inappropriate to the environment in which he is placed. There are lots of dogs who are not well suited to live in suburban homes, or small apartments - or any city or town. Just because the environment isn't suitable for the dog doesn't mean that the dog is bad.

And if a dog is to be well socialized to interact with and obey people it is important to begin working with him from birth. It is far easier to teach limits and define acceptable behavior when a dog is young. If a human assumes the role of pack leader while the dog is young then the dog will be far more focused on pleasing his human than on asserting his independence.

I know folks that have successfully kept rotties and pit bulls and assorted other "undesirable" mongrels. For decades. They've included them in their family and raised their children around them. They have all been dogs that were acquired at a very young age. They have all been only or dominant dogs (in terms of size) that had no need to become aggressive among other dogs for position. They were all neutered. They all had strict training regimens and defined behavioral expectations. They were expected to follow commands. They had established routines and lived in predominately rural settings. The dogs had jobs - either duties that they were expected to do (e.g., gather the cows twice daily, keep the rats out of the chicken feed, etc.) or duties that they defined for themselves. One fashioned himself not as the guardian of his people - but as the guardian of the shop, barn and farm equipment. He kept post on or under a flatbed trailer that he rarely left. Some of these dogs are quite sensitive to other animals and prove to be very capable of caring for and nurturing other farm animals. They will often stand guard over sick, abandoned or young animals - sometimes long after they have died. None of these dogs were viewed or treated as cuddly lovable kissable little bundles of fur. Most were not allowed inside the home - ever. And all of the owners had lots of previous experience with dogs.

There are dogs that ***become*** bad dogs because they are not placed in an appropriate environment or because their owners fail to properly train and socialize them. Is that the dog's fault? Is that truly a result of the dog's genetic makeup? And, yes, there are some dogs who must have stricter limitations than others.

The implications of saying that some dogs are bad simply due to their genetics is unacceptable. It denies the responsibility of their owners. It suggests there is no legitimate reason for their continued existence. And, theoretically, it argues for genetic selection - a dangerous precedent in any species and one that could easily be applied to humans.

Edit for grammar.
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gademocrat7 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:13 AM
Response to Reply #12
23. I agree.
We have 5 Jack Russell Terriers. Obedience training is a must. They need exercise and attention.
They are very intelligent animals who can create havoc if left to their own devices.
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China_cat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:26 AM
Response to Reply #12
25. There ARE bad dogs
and people who capitalize on the worst traits.

Case in point, my breed. The Bouvier. Normally aloof, quietly protective, willing to do what they need to protect their homes and families without being aggressive.

Thirty, maybe 40, years ago a certain breeder thought it would be a good idea to breed for aggression in the Bouv. So he mated the baddest dogs with the baddest bitches and came up with a line that was horribly aggressive, and he culled any that showed signs of being softer. He bred maybe 10 generations. Thirty years later, we're still trying to breed out that line and bring back the original, natural temprament.

Maybe once every couple years breed rescue ends up with a dog that they try everything with and can do nothing for the fact that it can't be trusted with other dogs or with people. You just CAN'T take the chance of trying to rehome a dog like that and you especially can't take the chance that its genes will be passed on. We hate it when we have to destroy a dog like that but it happens.

Start with a bad temperament and it doesn't matter how you nurture it, it's going to come out.

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Coyote_Bandit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:11 AM
Response to Reply #25
38. Please see
Edited on Thu Aug-03-06 11:11 AM by Coyote_Bandit
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China_cat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:27 AM
Response to Reply #38
39. There ARE bad dogs
born with a temperament that NO amount of love and training...no matter when started...is going to overcome. It's not the easiest thing in the world to admit, because I'd love to believe that every dog is redeemable over their breeding. But it just isn't so. And to try to deny it is to place time bombs in homes that don't realize what they have.

Yes, a good dog can be ruined with the wrong set of circumstances. But that doesn't mean a dog born with a genetic temperament for aggression can be somehow 'saved' by being loved and trained. You might get some successes...if the dog is carefully monitored for it's whole life. Most likely what you'll get is the day your loving pet kills the smaller dog next door for no good reason that you can see or bites your 6 year old child severely.

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Coyote_Bandit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 01:05 PM
Response to Reply #39
51. I guess
you didn't read my post.

***Every*** dog has the capacity to become aggressive given the right set of circumstances.

Every dog should be monitored and supervised by its owner for the duration of its lifetime. That is a health issue as well as a behavioral issue. It is a responsibility of all who own animals. I have seen more than a few small spoiled dogs become aggressive toward children. Suggesting that a lifetime of supervision is limited to "aggressive" dogs is irresponsible in my opinion.

Not every dog should be placed in a home.

Not every dog should live in a town or city.

Or have a little yappy annoying dog next door.

Just because a dog isn't capable of being a loving little huggable kissable spoiled furball who shares your bed and safely gives your kid rides doesn't mean he is a "bad" dog. It means that isn't the appropriate environment for him - which means that somebody chose a dog that wasn't suited for their particular lifestyle and circumstances. That is an error in human judgment. And it is those errors which often lead to the death of the yappy dog next door and the six year old being bitten and mauled.

But, guess what? That same dog could have thrived and offered invaluable service had he been placed in another environment (not necessarily as a pet) - again, assuming that he was treated and trained properly from a young age.

Not all dogs are destined to be pets. And the fact that a dog lacks the temperament of a pet does not make him inherently bad or useless.


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China_cat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:02 PM
Response to Reply #51
54. Yes, I read your post
What do you do with a dog that 'lacks the temperament of a pet'? Guard dog training? Guess what? The best guard/K9 corps/schutzhund dogs have to have the temperament to be STABLE, to be able to be a pet when not on duty.

What do you do with a dog born to a breeding that NEVER should have taken place because of the aggression of one or both of the parents? They're not suitable for any kind of work because they don't have the balance. They're the ones you teach to herd but they kill the stock, that can't be called off from a takedown, that can't play flyball because they can't get along with team members, that can't be used for S&R because they're likely to savage the people they're supposed to save.

What do you do with them? Stick them in a cage, feed and water them and hope they don't do any damage? Ignoring genetics is ridiculous and the biggest problem is with people who don't neuter and allow, even encourage, dangerous dogs to breed. Stop that and you stop about 90% of the problem.
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Coyote_Bandit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 04:51 PM
Response to Reply #54
68. There are places that are appropriate
They can be used to guard other animals against predators. Long-time poultry farmers, for example, will attest to their value in capturing and killing snakes and large rats - something most pets are not up to. There is no danger to the poultry because they are inside while the dog and intended predators are outside.

Likewise, they can be used to capture and kill the vermin that often live in crops and prevent them from finding better digs in the farmers home or shop or barn.

And, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes they can be used as companion animals to other young, sick or injured animals - provided they were separted from other dogs at a young age and raised with and around the animals they are expected to protect.

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havocmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:52 AM
Response to Original message
13. Mine couldn't care less about any ol ball
Edited on Thu Aug-03-06 09:53 AM by havocmom
but don't mess with his cat or his pet girl!

And don't mess with momma. She's got the recipes and he protects da momma!

Seriously, even a Golden can be provoked. And when a breed enjoys a big surge in popularity, seems unscrupulous breeders try to cash in. Result is that a lot of dogs get bred who do not have the temperament one expects from the breed. Popularity in the market usually seems to spell trouble for any 'breed d'jour'.

My big boy loves kids, but I won't leave him alone with one. Kids don't always behave the way we would like. Same with dogs. There is NO SUBSTITUTE for parenting, training, supervision of children AND dogs.

Oh, and at my house, it's the cat who poses the bigger threat.
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:45 AM
Response to Reply #13
31. A similar Golden observation
Sarcasm off. OK.

I have noticed that the three lines of Goldens have somewhat different temperaments. Supposedly there are the original hunting lines, the show lines and the service (seeing eye) lines.

My Golden came from a breeder in Iowa and is definitely from the hunting line. Less luxurious fur, slightly redder/darker and a crazy work drive to retrieve and swim. The original line is so friendly because they were bred to sit in duck blinds with both owner/guide and any guest and even any strange retriever for hours and just be pleased to be around both pack leader and strangers.

I noticed that breeders who created the show line dogs I've met -- more luxurious looking coat, lighter -- have not emphasized that temperament, and can be snippy or unfriendly.

The service lines are as friendly as the hunting line, but are less pupply like and rambunctious. I could not imagine my Golden as a service dog because he would be dragging his blind person off to be petted by every stranger he sees on the street.
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havocmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:53 AM
Response to Reply #31
41. My woofer is disinclined to swim. Retrieve? You threw it, you go get it!
He has trained several small human pals to retrieve though. We don't hunt, so he tries to befriend every critter he sees, including ceramic duck lawn ornaments. He tries to keep mice away from the cat and Havocdad. He has a pet toad (non poisonous type) and he is trying to get the snake in the yard to make nice.

He is a self-made handi-dog. When I have a flare up that leaves me very clumsy and makes it difficult to get around, he will be there to steady me. And he will retrieve things for me at such times. When I am well, he will grab what he isn't suppose to have and tease me into chasing him. He knows I need the exercise!

He could pull a small car so I have to just a halter-type head lead on him. He pulls the cat around in a box when she wants a ride.

Incredible comprehensive vocabulary, he is great at errands around the house.
He has the redder, rougher coat you spoke of. But he is a bit stand-offish with most strangers. I think it is due more to observation than nature in his case. There are neighbor kids who have made it their life's work to torment the dogs stuck in a dog run 24/7 next door. My big boy knows that is wrong and he vehemently rails at the injustice of it. I think he's a liberal ;) He is careful about picking friends as a result of his observations that some humans are just not good-dogs.
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 12:15 PM
Response to Reply #41
44. LOL!
He trained several small humans to retrieve! Yes, dogs are human trainers. In the morning, my dog is very excited and wants to play while everyone else is getting ready for work/school. He chooses that time to run off with freshly ironed shirts, underwear etc, always to the same place on the couch, where he drops them and stares at them. I kept wondering why can't we train him not to do this. Then I read an article about Goldens and realized he was training us to play "chase me" every morning by trying to get back our clothes.

I think he is excessively friendly because when he was a puppy, we had just moved into an old house. I was doing lots of work on the house, but also had regular visits from the plumber, electrician, etc., and everyone would come in and say, what a nice dog, can I pet him? And of course, we said yes. So every early interaction with humans was fun and friendly. I think he has never actually had a bad interaction with a human and it shows in his temperament! Several people who before meeting him were afraid of dogs have been converted to being able to pet them because of his excessive friendliness.
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KurtNYC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 05:15 PM
Response to Reply #31
70. I know people who breed and train service dogs
and they claim that the lighter coated goldens are more docile and low key. They prefer goldens from the english lines.

Not my friends' site but info on English Goldens: http://www.englishgoldens.net/home.htm
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havocmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 08:40 PM
Response to Reply #70
73. The 90 Pound Hound had such a docile, fair coated mother
Her owner (if one can own a Golden) says she is the sweetest dog she has ever had. She is a bit smaller, more delicate than the hunting Goldens one sees. My hound's papa might have been a bear. He has the reddish coat, big neck ruff and feathers and bones not made to break. He is blocky; a gentle giant.

And he wants to sit in laps at the first clap of thunder. He is a clown when off duty and all business when he is with me and children. He herds and carefully situates himself between any stranger and a child in our charge. If there is a cat or small breed dog to make friends with, he will flatten himself to the ground to look less imposing. He 'gets small' to put other critters at ease, but he is Alpha. He just knows he doesn't have to force the issue unless some other dog is being a real problem.

Swims like a rock. He watched my sister's Golden/Ridgeback cross and my brother's Pomerainian swimming gracefully in her pool. He just thought he could stroll out and walk on water (Pool is dark grey, so it does look sorta solid) Sank to the bottom, looked somewhat puzzled, then strolled across the bottom of the pool (with me tense and my brother and Havocdad, both VERY strong swimmers, watching for sign of trouble). They assured me to give the dog a few seconds and he would bob up. He did. He was very chagrined, but just fine.

Like a lot of Goldens, he does that 'Elvis lips' half smile/snarl thing. I think they are all making fun of Cheney. Hey! All Goldens must be liberals! :woohoo:
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dropkickpa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:40 PM
Response to Reply #31
78. I've noticed that too
My Amos was from a hunting line and in his younger days he was a gorgeous dark red and didn't have the fluffy coat that show lines have (but his coat was perfect for swimming). We actually had a different girl from a fabulous hunting line and we bred them for a couple litters (Andy, his first wife, died while under anesthesia for a minor procedure to remove a dewclaw that had gotten snagged and torn on fishing line at a park). Amos also was very much in demand as a stud. MANY of his kids, and now grandkids, were and are therapy dogs, and two even went on to be guide dogs! He wasn't so hot on the retrieving side, but he was MAD for water. As a kid, many a slip'n'slide was full of dog hair. He always had his own baby pool in addition to ours so we could fit. There was a park near our house that had a pond (actually a man-made lake from a dammed stream), and he made for the water like a slingshot the minute we hit the entrance to the park. He would happily paddle around after the ducks for hours. And he lived for being around kids. He was never happier than when he was jut positively dripping kids at the park.

Molly was a rescue, so we are not sure of her lines, but she had the soft mouth retrieving thing down pat. She used to carry around this old dishtowel like it was a duck all day long. She was a very dignified lady, never losing her polite manner, kind of like the proper but loving caretaker of a victorian orphanage.
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SheilaT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:52 AM
Response to Original message
14. The thing with dogs
regardless of breed is that they need to be socialized and trained properly. A lot of people don't do that.

I have a good friend who always has a dog or two, but never gets them properly trained. These are always your basic nondescript, maybe mixed breed dog that likes people and, doing the correct doggie thing, wants to protect its humans, but because of lack of training tends to keep barking after a friend is let in the house, and then jump up in happy friendliness. Arrghh!

I really do like dogs. While I personally prefer to own cats, what I like best about dogs is how very attuned to humans they are. Several years back I was doing volunteer work at a local animal shelter as a receptionist, and what I noticed was that every single dog who came through the reception area (the walkers had to bring them that way to get outside for the walks) wanted to greet every single human along the way.

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havocmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:56 AM
Response to Reply #14
17. Same is true with too many children
They are left to parent themselves. They end up with poor social skills and no ability to relate to others, make friends, build relationships. They get frustrated and often that manifests as hostility.

Half feral dogs and half feral kids are ALWAYS a bad mix.
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dipsydoodle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:54 AM
Response to Original message
15. Don't forget Chihuahuas
Remember The Predator . Well this is a Chihuahua skull



They've also been know to kill Irish Wolfhounds - get stuck in their thoat.
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BigMama50 Donating Member (58 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 03:33 PM
Response to Reply #15
67. Oh, I would love to have one for a necklace
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chaumont58 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:57 AM
Response to Original message
18. I'm a non-believer, but I like to repeat what I heard about...
a certain creation. The saying goes that God was so disappointed at how his creation, the teenager, turned out, that he created the Golden Retriever to make up for it.
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MountainLaurel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:10 AM
Response to Original message
22. I know the dangers of tennis ball interception
Before this past weekend (when our goldie got into fights with two other dogs while we were visiting my folks), the only time I ever heard him growl was when another dog tried to take his tennis ball.
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msmcghee Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:13 AM
Response to Original message
24. All dogs are potentially dangerous.
Edited on Thu Aug-03-06 10:15 AM by msmcghee
Dogs have very little ability to reason - to figure things out when they are faced with a strange or scary (to them) situation. Humans have intellect to add to the equation.

That means dogs will rely mostly on their instincts. For example, most humans would instinctively draw back at the sight of a coiled shape while poking around under the bushes - but we can quickly reason that the shape is a garden hose and not a snake. Dogs can be repeatedly introduced to the postman but many will retain their fear of this strange looking deliberate-walking human with the hat all their lives anyway.

What this means is that dogs that find themselves in a strange situation will only have their instincts to guide them. If they are left alone in a room with a small child and they hear a loud noise (like a firecracker from outside) their instincts may tell them to hide - or to attack whatever living thing is near them that may be about to kill them.

When humans get bigger - they are safer around dogs because dogs are instinctively cautious around other animals that are big enough to harm them. Or, they are wired to instinctively choose fight or flee according to the size of their adversary - among other variables.

All animals are going to depend on instincts when in a threatening situation. So we are gambling that the situation always remains such that their instincts won't cause them to harm us or our loved ones. That's a gamble that no-one should take with their family pets and their small children IMO.

PS - I've had five Golden Retrievers in my life - so far. They were the most wonderful partners.
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sistersofmercy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:43 AM
Response to Original message
29. Oh how menancing...
Attack Golden Retrievers. I've heard about that. I have an Attack Papillon and he's 6 1/2 pounds of pure viciousness. :scared: :7
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reichstag911 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:00 AM
Response to Reply #29
32. You have an attack butterfly?!?
Where can I get one? :eyes:
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Bake Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:06 AM
Response to Original message
37. HA! My Lhasa scoffs at your attack golden retriever!
Her name is Muffin, but my son's friends call her by her real name, "Satan."

Bake
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ComerPerro Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:31 AM
Response to Original message
40. the entire breed should be destroyed, and the owners should be killed
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havocmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 11:55 AM
Response to Reply #40
42. Why do you hate Furry Dogistan?
Whudda ya, some kinda anti-K9ite?
:evilgrin:
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ComerPerro Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 12:13 PM
Response to Reply #42
43. LOL, anti-K9ite
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havocmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 12:19 PM
Response to Original message
45. We need some more Recommendations for this one
because it is healthy to laugh now and then. And, boy, do we need some comedy relief around here right now!
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 12:26 PM
Response to Reply #45
46. You wouldn't be laughing if YOU were being menaced by an Attack Golden! nt
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havocmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 12:30 PM
Response to Reply #46
48. I am posting while eating lunch
and I am being menaced... The Drool Pool is getting deep. I may drown.
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SaveElmer Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 12:26 PM
Response to Original message
47. Sorry it is the Beagle you must worry about...
Not only cunning, but excellent in interrogation with that constant bark...

Sure they look innocent...




But did you know they could fly!!!!


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pointblank Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 01:14 PM
Response to Reply #47
52. AAUUUUUUUGGHGHHHH!
Im terrified!

I'm glad I have my two guardians to help me out!




Don't be alarmed....Gus may look dumb, but he is very cunning!




....and ANNIE..WOW, don't get me started on her viciousness. Be especially careful when you give her food from your hand...she WILL try to take your fingers along with the treat...always use the treat-in-palm method with her. (BTW, Annie is in the background...I dont have any direct photos of her. She hates the camera! ;) )



(seriously though, thats a beautiful Beagle you have there!)

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reichstag911 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 03:10 PM
Response to Reply #47
64. HA!
I did know they could fly (although my attack beagle puppy has only one flap engaged in this pic):

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Taxloss Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:06 PM
Response to Original message
55. There was a funny "dangerous" dog story in the Guardian today, about a
Doberman Pinscher called "Barney":

When Barney met Mabel, there was an instant - and fatal - chemical reaction.
On Tuesday night the doberman pinscher guard dog, after six years' blameless service, went berserk: within minutes Mabel, a 1909 German-made Steiff teddy bear once owned by Elvis Presley, more recently the pride and joy of an English aristocrat, lay mortally wounded.

Barney went on to rampage through hundreds of rare teddies, all on loan to Wookey Hole Caves in Somerset, and so valuable that the insurers had insisted on a guard dog to protect the premises at night. The aftermath, according to shocked staff, was appalling: shattered limbs, gouged eyes, ears torn off, and pools of sawdust everywhere.

"Up to 100 bears were involved in the massacre," Daniel Medley, general manager of Wookey Hole Caves, said last night. "It was a dreadful scene."


The full horrifying story:

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0,,1836014,00.htm...

The culprit, looking sheepish:

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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:14 PM
Response to Reply #55
56. That made my day! Look at the guilty face on that dog! nt
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calico1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:43 PM
Response to Reply #55
61. I like that the Brits leave the Dobie's ears
alone. I think they look so cute like that.
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reichstag911 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 03:13 PM
Response to Reply #55
65. OH, the humanity!
Or would it be the...um...ursinity?!? :shrug:
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Cleita Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:20 PM
Response to Original message
58. What a nice dog!
eom
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Rex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:21 PM
Response to Original message
59. That second picture! I've wet'um, I'm so skeerd!
Okay people if you see a dog look like it does in the second pic (sans hand), then you can be scared. That means the dog WANTS you to see his big ass teeth.

Not more canine 'profiling'...when will it end? :sarcasm:
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Tinksrival Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:34 PM
Response to Original message
60. I would like to add this dog to the list.
When I was five years old my mother took me to her friends house and this bred took a chunk out of my arm when I reached for the candy dish on a coffee table.

I think these immigrants should be deported back to Scotland including his little beast:

Kiss your puppy bye-bye. The dog is a terrierist!
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LynneSin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:45 PM
Original message
If I were that dog, I'd bite the hand off just for squeezing my nose
I know I wouldn't like it
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HarukaTheTrophyWife Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:50 PM
Response to Original message
63. It's not really squeezing the nose, just pulling up the lips.
It's something that every dog owner should get their dog used to, both for dental care and for getting stuff out of the dog's mouth.
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 05:46 PM
Response to Original message
71. Just ignore the hand ...
pretend it isn't there, look at the snarl, and you will realize just how vicious Golden Retrievers actually are!
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LynneSin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 02:45 PM
Response to Original message
62. If I were that dog, I'd bite the hand off just for squeezing my nose
I know I wouldn't like it
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Karenca Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 03:16 PM
Response to Original message
66. There is no dog finer that a Golden!
My baby, Phoebe is away with family in Connecticut right now.
I miss her soooooo much.

The poodle and I are eagerly awaiting her return.

Your dog is gorgeous!
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 05:48 PM
Response to Reply #66
72. I agree, but ...
My golden is a great dog -- when he is not in attack mode, of course!
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havocmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 08:46 PM
Response to Reply #72
75. Hey, where's NSMA? She has a great Golden pal.
Well, off to sweep up fur... blowin coat time at the Havoc House!
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dropkickpa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 09:23 PM
Response to Original message
77. See, they ARE terrible!!
I recognize that terrifying face!

Here's dropkid and Molly bin Sleepin (action shot, she's about to get Molly in a choke-hold to subdue her after the slobber attack on Dropkids hair)


And a stealth attack on Amos al-Slobbari


Seriously, I adore goldens. Unfortunately, within a year of these pictures (taken about 4 years ago), both dogs had gone (they were 14 and 15 in the pictures, if you couldn't tell they were old, they had both gone quite white). I miss them terribly every day.

Amos actually is the one who taught Dropkid to walk. She would grab a hold of him, he'd haul himself up, and VERRRRY slowly start strolling. Whenever she fell, he would turn around, lay back down, and wait for her to grab another hold. He HATED when he couldn't be right with her, he would pace and pace outside the baby gate. And her shrieks never bugged him (he was deaf as a stump by that point).

Until recently, my daughter would ask people "Can I soft your dog?" when she wanted to pet them because she heard "Soft, soft" anytime she approached the dogs. I taught her from day one to approach gently and to never hurt, tug or any other unpleasant thing to the dogs. The amazing thing is that she remembers them vividly.

Friends of the family still get very maudlin when talking about them.
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HamdenRice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Aug-03-06 10:19 PM
Response to Reply #77
79. Dropkickpa, that is an incredible story
That story is incredible and heartbreaking. I know this sounds maudlin, and phony, but sentimentality has its place:

Some day, you and dropkid will see Molly and Amos at rainbow bridge. Sigh .........
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dropkickpa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-05-06 07:36 PM
Response to Reply #79
80. Thank you.
I can't even think about that poem without bawling :cry: , but I know they are gonna be right there waiting, smiling their goofy golden grins.
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Catchawave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-05-06 09:19 PM
Response to Original message
81. NO, this nest of vicious weiner dogs should be
BANNED:

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