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Nightly "What is the origin of that phrase?" Axe me anything!

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caledesi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 06:47 PM
Original message
Nightly "What is the origin of that phrase?" Axe me anything!
Well tonight folks, it isn't really a phrase, but rather why the pronunication of the word "ask" is sometimes pronounced "axe?"

Example: So, I axed him what he was going to do tonight.


BTW, you will be quite surprised by the explanation.



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pinkpops Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 06:53 PM
Response to Original message
1. Rutabaga Tales by carl sandburg
Has a character "Ax me no questions"
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phaseolus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 06:53 PM
Response to Original message
2. I dunno.
I'd guess it's some rural South thing ... which would make it some sort of ancient Scots-Irish Gaelic thing...??
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caledesi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 06:56 PM
Response to Reply #2
3. No. Will give a hint in 20 minutes or so. It's very interesting, so
stay tuned.
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caledesi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 06:59 PM
Response to Original message
4. Hint: The "axe" pronunciation originated in England. So how did
it come here and why do a lot of Afro-Americans used this pronunciation. THIS IS A BIG HINT - Afro-American!
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Rabrrrrrr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 07:36 PM
Response to Reply #4
5. I don't know, but I'm curious!
And people still, today, say "Aks" instead of "ask". Very unfortunate, since it labels them (fairly or unfairly, take your pick) as less than properly intelligent.
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caledesi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 07:42 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. That is why you will be quite surprised by the explanation!
I will post explanation at 9PM EST if no one has answered correctly.
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Rabrrrrrr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 07:55 PM
Response to Reply #6
9. Wel, I'm on the edge of my seat awaiting!
All I can figure, and I can't remember the technical term, is that it's a simple reversal of the "K" and "S" phonemes, which consonant switching has often occurred throughout history, changing words irrevocably for all time.
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foo_bar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 09:09 PM
Response to Reply #9
13. metathesis
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Rabrrrrrr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 09:26 PM
Response to Reply #13
15. Yeah, that's what I wanted
All I could think of was metasthesis or something similar, and I kew that whatever "sound" I was coming up with wasn't correct...
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Robb Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 07:43 PM
Response to Original message
7. Ooooo....
This one's got me a-wonderin'.... do tell!
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greatauntoftriplets Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 07:44 PM
Response to Original message
8. It is from Olde English or Middle English?
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caledesi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 08:00 PM
Response to Reply #8
10. This is a difficult one. Let me give you the explanation.
In Northern England there were "elites" who pronounced the word "ask" as "axe." When they emigrated to the US in the South, they acquired black slaves. These slaves, learning English used the SAME pronunciation "axe" for "ask."

Cool, huh? Gives a whole new meaning as to why Afro-Americans sometimes use the pronunciation "axe" instead of "ask." Not a perjorative at all.



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Rabrrrrrr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 08:28 PM
Response to Reply #10
11. Interesting! Any sources on that?
I'd like to see some links, and more indepth discussion.

Thanks!
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foo_bar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 09:07 PM
Response to Reply #11
12. here ya go
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Rabrrrrrr Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 09:25 PM
Response to Reply #12
14. Wow! Totally cool!
Thanks for the post! I love the ending of it:

I'd like to close this discussion with what seems to be an
apropos maxim from Christ's sermon on the Mount in Miles Coverdale's
Bible, 1535 (supplied to me by Alain Thomas): "Axe and it shal be
giuen you."
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caledesi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 10:01 PM
Response to Reply #12
17. Thank you hyg....I knew someone would come up with the real scoop.
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Stuckinthebush Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 09:37 PM
Response to Reply #10
16. Similar to the TH sound for Z
in some Spanish dialects (I think). Such as in the golfer Jose Maria Olazabal. His last name is pronounced Olathabal with a sort of a lisp where the Z should be.

I remember watching a show that discussed this pronunciation as being rooted in an old Spanish king's lisp. All of his nobility didn't want to offend him, so they started lisping the Z as well. This passed down to their children, etc.
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caledesi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-11-03 10:03 PM
Response to Reply #16
18. Oh, now that is interesting. SITB.
I think the most salient factor here is that "axe" is NOT a perorgative term.
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