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Where did Aunt Jemima come from?

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Shell Beau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:51 PM
Original message
Where did Aunt Jemima come from?
Isn't she kind of offensive? Same for Mrs. Buttersworth.

*This is NOT intended as flame bait*

I really am curious about this.
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Spider Jerusalem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:53 PM
Response to Original message
1. The black "mammy" stereotype...
of the antebellum (and often, thanks to Jim Crow, Reconstruction) South, popularised in minstrel shows...
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peace frog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:16 PM
Response to Reply #1
26. Correct, and
Edited on Thu Jul-14-05 03:17 PM by peace frog
elderly slaves were universally addressed as "Aunt" and "Uncle" (as in Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben).
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BamaLefty Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:54 PM
Response to Original message
2. A Slave n/t
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RummyTheDummy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:55 PM
Response to Original message
3. Don't know. Don't care.
But she makes some damn fine pancakes.
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Shell Beau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:55 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. I buy those two brands, but I am curious if black (or anyone
Edited on Thu Jul-14-05 02:56 PM by Shell Beau
for that matter)people find it offensive.
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RummyTheDummy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:00 PM
Response to Reply #4
9. Ive known a couple who did
And several others who didn't give it much thought.
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Shell Beau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:02 PM
Response to Reply #9
12. I never gave it much thought until
I saw some post that mentioned Aunt Jemima. Then for some reason I had a picture of her in my head and wondered if it was offensive.
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BamaLefty Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:20 PM
Response to Reply #4
28. I doubt it.
They're so used to that sort of thing they just brush it off. At least the blacks I know don't seem to mind.
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ronnykmarshall Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:00 PM
Response to Reply #3
10. Looks like she's hangin' out w/ nuns these days.
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ronnykmarshall Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:02 PM
Response to Reply #10
11. That nun gets around .....


she dancing w/ ol Chiquita Banana.
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Shell Beau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:03 PM
Response to Reply #11
13. Ha ha!
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Fenris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:56 PM
Response to Original message
5. Mammy stereotype.
Developed in the post-Civil War era to appeal to whites who longed for the "good old days" when they could simply have their slaves do their work for them.
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WCGreen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:57 PM
Response to Original message
6. Frangelica is Mrs. Butterworths evil twin....
BYW, I seem to remember from the commercials that Mbs. Butterworth was white....
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Shell Beau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:59 PM
Response to Reply #6
8. Oh is she? I have never seen that. I guess
with the bottle filled with syrup she looked black. I guess she can be whatever color you want her to be!
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WCGreen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:05 PM
Response to Reply #8
16. Look at the frangelica bottle and you will
see the resemblence to Mrs. Butterworth....
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yewberry Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:50 PM
Response to Reply #6
31. Do you mean frangelico, the liqueur?
I think the bottle is supposed to be shaped like a (mythical?) Italian monk--Fra. Angelico--in his robes.

Rope belt and all!
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msongs Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 02:59 PM
Response to Original message
7. from the RNC: jemima /butterworth: closet lesbians trying to poison the
children of america? infiltrating the grocery store to destroy god fearing society one bite of sugar at a time?

Nah.

I got mine at the grocery store, now I make my own it is tooo easy and much better.

Msongs
www.msongs.com
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ronnykmarshall Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:03 PM
Response to Original message
14. From the White House
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NoPasaran Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:04 PM
Response to Original message
15. Modeled on a real person
The world knew her as "Aunt Jemima" but her given name was Nancy Green. The famous Aunt Jemima recipe was not her recipe but she became the advertising world's first living trademark. Miss Green was born a slave in Montgomery County, Kentucky. Chris Rutt, a newspaperman, and Charles Underwood bought the Pearl Milling Company and had the original idea of developing and packaging a ready-mixed, self-rising pancake flour. To survive in a highly competitive business, the men needed an image for their product.

In 1889, Rutt attended a vaudeville show where he heard a catchy tune called "Aunt Jemima" sung by a blackface performer who was wearing an apron and bandanna headband. He decided to call their pancake flour "Aunt Jemima". Later, Rutt and Underwood were so short of capital funds that they were broke. In 1890, they sold the formula to the R. T. Davis Milling Company. Mr. Davis began looking for a Negro woman to employ as a living trademark for his product, and he found Nancy Green in Chicago. She was 56 years old. The Aunt Jemima Pancake Mix was introduced in St. Joseph, Missouri.

In 1893, the Davis Milling Company aggressively began an all-out promotion of "Aunt Jemima" at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Green, as "Aunt Jemima" demonstrated the pancake mix and served thousands of pancakes. Green was a hit, friendly, a good storyteller, and a good cook. Her warm and appealing personality made her the ideal "Aunt Jemima" a living trademark. Her exhibition booth drew so many people that special policemen were assigned to keep the crowds moving. The Davis Milling Company received over 50,000 orders, and Fair officials awarded Nancy Green a medal and certificate for her showmanship.

She was proclaimed "Pancake Queen." She was signed to a lifetime contract and traveled on promotional tours all over the country. Flour sales were up all year and pancakes were no longer considered exclusively for breakfast. Nancy Green maintained this job until a car crash in Chicago killed her, on September 23, 1923. The Davis Company also ran into money problems, and the Quaker Oats Company purchased the Aunt Jemima Mills in 1925

http://www.aaregistry.com/african_american_history/1287...
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Shell Beau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:06 PM
Response to Reply #15
19. Interesting! Thanks for the info.
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nothingshocksmeanymore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:21 PM
Response to Reply #15
29. You beat me to it...I had a book way back when called
"Why did they name it?" that gave the story of products and how they came to be
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Taverner Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:05 PM
Response to Original message
17. The Aunt Jemima Story
The official one

http://www.foodreference.com/html/fauntjemimapancake.ht...

And a bit more behind it

http://scoop.diamondgalleries.com/scoop_article.asp?ai=...

For a great movie about representations of blacks in media, check out Spike Lee's Excellent (and unnoticed) Bamboozled.
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ronnykmarshall Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:06 PM
Response to Original message
18. From Puerto Rico


Aunt Ines
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Dhalgren Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:08 PM
Response to Original message
20. I always thought that she looked a lot like my
Grandmother (whom we all called, "Momma").
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maveric Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:11 PM
Response to Original message
21. And what's the deal with Uncle Ben?
A "step n fetch it" stereotype?
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Shell Beau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:13 PM
Response to Reply #21
23. My hometown was home to the factory or
Edited on Thu Jul-14-05 03:13 PM by Shell Beau
whatever you call it. Where they made the rice. Yeah, I forgot about Uncle Ben.
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gmoney Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:14 PM
Response to Reply #21
24. What's small, white, and crawls up your leg?
Uncle Ben's Perverted Rice...


"I love rice. Rice is great when you're hungry for like 2000 of something." -- Mitch Hedberg (paraphrased from memory)
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Shell Beau Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:27 PM
Response to Reply #24
30. Aw, Mitch. I loved his sense of humor.
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Taverner Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:14 PM
Response to Reply #21
25. Stepin Fetchit
was the stage name of a character actor....

http://www.aaregistry.com/african_american_history/909/...
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Sequoia Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 04:10 PM
Response to Reply #21
32. I know a little:
That book, "The Empire of Chocolate" mentions that the Mars Candy guy went to this restaurant where a black waiter named Ben would serve him and that's where the name came from.
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MN ChimpH8R Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 06:28 PM
Response to Reply #21
37. Uncle Ben
Supposedly there actually was a real rice farmer who was the model or inspiration for Uncle Ben. Read it at The Straight Dope, IIRC.
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gmoney Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:12 PM
Response to Original message
22. "Imitation of Life"
"Imitation of Life" is a tearjerker movie with Claudette Colbert that seems to be based on some sort of fictionalized, mythologized version of Aunt Jemima. Kind of strange premise, and somewhat politically outdated (the Jemima character has a daughter who tries to "pass" for white, while ignoring her lovin' mother), but maybe worth a watch on a rainy afternoon as a cultural relic.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/078322764...
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ronnykmarshall Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 03:19 PM
Response to Reply #22
27. The one with Lana Turner was great too.
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Sequoia Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 04:12 PM
Response to Reply #27
33. Totally, with Natalie Wood and Sandra Dee!
A real sob story. I hated that the black characer had to call Launa Miss something, but Natalie's mother was always called by her first name. But the Civil Rights Movement was just getting underway when that movie was made.
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caty Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 06:31 PM
Response to Reply #33
38. It wasn't Natalie Wood,
it was Susan Kohner. She resembled Natalie Wood.



http://www.thegoldenglobes.com/welcome.html?nominee/koh...
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caty Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 04:27 PM
Response to Original message
34. Women who have portrayed Aunt Jemima:
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Bouncy Ball Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 04:29 PM
Response to Original message
35. Nevermind.
Edited on Thu Jul-14-05 04:30 PM by Bouncy Ball
NoPasaran's got the story above.
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MercutioATC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jul-14-05 06:09 PM
Response to Original message
36. I know where the guy on the Pringles' can came from...
It's a representation of the man who worked at P&G who developed the process of mashing up potatoes, molding them into chips, and putting them in a can.

Seriously.

(he's a third cousin of mine)
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