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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:29 AM
Original message
Guitar players, step in. Advice needed!
Ok, so I have never played a lick of guitar in my life. I'm 24 years old. I've always wanted to start playing, but for some reason always told myself it was too late, I'd missed my chance, etc etc. Well, I'm sick of telling myself its too late. Its one of my resolutions for the year. I may never get good, but its something I want to do, and I'm gonna try.

So, my question--what is the best way for a beginner to get started? Acoustic or electric? Any tips for books to pick up, brands to use, anything at all? I am pretty much open to any and all advice. Thanks alot!
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Skink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:34 AM
Response to Original message
1. Read.
Learn to read and you are a step up.......................but don't let that get in the way.

Kay....
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mr_hat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:43 AM
Response to Reply #1
8. I agree w/ TS. Get a reasonably priced accoustic guitar >
(Washburn, Epiphone, Ovation) and be diligent about practicing.

Learn the basics, learn to read tabs, learn to play by ear. Ever hear someone learning to play the fiddle? No point in amplifying your errors at this point. Have fun!
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Tandalayo_Scheisskopf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:36 AM
Response to Original message
2. Get an easy to play guitar, acoustic/electric.
Something you can easily practice upon, without a lot of pain, hear in your bedroom or plug into an amp, or headphones. One with a cutaway, perhaps, so you can hit the higher frets with ease.

Brand? Well, the lower priced stuff, like a Washburn, is good and if you decide that gitfiddle playing is not for you, the financial outlay is not a source of lifelong regret.

Take lessons. Learn from one who has gone before. Did you know that right to the end of his life, Randy Rhodes took lessons? Many of the really good ones do. Many do not. Your choice.

I am an old guitar roadie. Spent 27 years before that mast. Worked for some really big bands and guitar players and a lot of not-so-big. I do know the subject. Very well indeed. I wouldn't shit you with the advice.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:41 AM
Response to Reply #2
5. I'll ultimately want to play electric, so I guess I'll start there.
And I do plan on getting lessons. Thanks for all the advice!
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LoZoccolo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:46 AM
Response to Reply #5
14. Yeah go electric if you want to. It's not that much more expensive.
Plus you get to rock right away.
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Lostnote03 Donating Member (850 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 01:12 AM
Response to Reply #2
24. I salute you!!!!!....Roadies Rule!!!!
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johnnie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:38 AM
Response to Original message
3. There is a great forum here
We have a musicians forum that can help you out a lot.
http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.ph...
As for my input/opinion:
I would say the best thing to do is get an acoustic. Don't go too cheap because it would suck and you would get frustrated playing. Get yourself some songbooks on music you like. They have the chords in them and shows you where to place your fingers to play the chords. This way you will know the songs and then you can start out slow and work your way up to the right speed.
Of course almost all musicians will tell you that you should also learn music theory and that crap..and it's good advice, but I was too lazy. There are a lot of websites out there also that have a lot of free information on beginners guitar that can really help.
good luck and have fun. It can be fun.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:42 AM
Response to Reply #3
6. thanks!
heh, I said above I'd get an electric but I am really very torn. I would like to master both eventually but I gotta start somewhere I guess. Thanks for the advice!
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johnnie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:44 AM
Response to Reply #6
12. Nothing wrong with starting with an electric
I just like playing acoustic. I have a few of each..lol. An electric will be a lot better for your fingers (as in pain), but an acoustic will build your fingers up. Just my opinion, and the other advice that was given up there :thumbsup: is great also.
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HEyHEY Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:41 AM
Response to Original message
4. I began at 20 and I play fine now-- even finger pick
Best thing is to get tabs and learn chords... that way you get your fingers moving. Then, what helped me, was I found a teacher that based his lessons on music I liked...find one like that. Truly though...the most important thing is enjoying it...when I started I played like 4 hours a day just cause I loved it.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:44 AM
Response to Reply #4
11. I'm hoping I'll be a natural...
Music is such a central part of my life, and I feel like I have so much stuff running through my head just waiting to come out...As long as I don't get too frustrated I think I will be a quick learner and hopefully will enjoy the beginning stages.

Finding a teacher whose musical tastes are in line with mine may be tough, I live in a backwards kinda town, much easier to find people to teach Van Halen's style than, say, Kevin Shields'. Oh well, maybe I'll get lucky.

Mind if I ask how old you are now?
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HEyHEY Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 01:26 AM
Response to Reply #11
27. 25
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porkrind Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:17 AM
Response to Reply #4
34. I didn't know you were a guitarist
I KNEW I liked you. :)
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Ron Green Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:43 AM
Response to Original message
7. Don't get a cheap guitar.
It'll never be fun or easy to play, so you're not as likely to practice it. And if you don't decide to continue, a good guitar holds much more of its value than a cheapie. A good one will sometimes even appreciate over time.

I would recommend an acoustic with a wide neck, maybe even a nylon-string folk style guitar. The most important thing is learning chords and pieces of chords, and how they work into the music you want to play.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:46 AM
Response to Reply #7
15. Thanks! I should be able to pick up something decent
I realize it'd be a self-defeating sort of thing to start on something I wouldn't enjoy at all. Thanks for the input!
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LoZoccolo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:43 AM
Response to Original message
9. I think Squier makes excellent starter guitars.
They're Fender's starter line.

http://www.squierguitars.com

They also have complete starter packs with amp included as well.
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ZoCrowes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:44 AM
Response to Original message
10. Its never too late
To me the guitar is the most enjoyable thing I can think of doing (next to scuba diving and sex.) What matters the most is that you are enjoying playing.

That being said it really does boil down to what do you want to do? What type of music do you like?

Most people would suggest starting out playing acoustic and I tend to agree with that. An acoustic you can take with you almost anywhere with little to no hassle. As Stephen Stills says there is no hiding behind an acoustic guitar. I've been playing Washburn acoustics here lately and I have been pleased with it. It's their entry level model that I bought to use as a beater guitar and wound up falling in love with it. Best $100 I have ever spent. Your best bet would be to go around to a few of your local music stores and to tell the people there what you are looking for. A good local instrument shop is your most valuable assest.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:49 AM
Response to Reply #10
17. Right on...
I'm not 100% sure what I want to do ultimately, my tastes cover a pretty wide range. I definately have a soft spot for acoustic stuff like Nick Drake, Elliott Smith, etc, but ultimately (if I ever got to this point) I think I'd want to do some experimentation with distortion ala Thurston Moore or Kevin Shields. I know thats an awfully long way off though, so just getting comfortable with my fingers will be the first step.
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Osamasux Donating Member (846 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:46 AM
Response to Original message
13. Nylon-stringed acoustics make good starter guitars
Easy on the fingers. Helps in learning both acoustic and electric techniques.

Get a decent guitar. Something properly built with accurate intonations - some real cheap guitars have improperly spaced frets or bridges and just can never be in tune above the third or fifth fret, no matter what you do. You don't need to spend a fortune. A good used guitar can be less expensive and hold its value better than a more new guitar of lower quality. Brands matter. Bring someone who plays to check out guitars with you.

Lessons from the right teacher move you along much quicker. Practice. Books.

If you can borrow a guitar or two first, it will help point you in the direction of the style you want to go in.

The style of music you want to play should be the biggest factor in what type of guitar you buy. Don't buy a National Steel if you want to learn classical.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:54 AM
Original message
I think I'll need to experiment a bit
like I said above I am interested in distortion and that sort of thing, but finding the perfect tone is definately a big priority for me too. I'll try to poke around before I settle on anything. Thanks!
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Osamasux Donating Member (846 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:48 AM
Response to Original message
16. If you do go with an electric, go with light strings at the start.
Maybe .009's. Again, easier on the fingers until you build up your calluses.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:50 AM
Response to Reply #16
18. I'll remember that, thanks! n/t
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ragin_acadian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 01:42 AM
Response to Reply #16
29. definately,
MirrorAshes,
slinky's are the way to go if you are learning, learn your pentatonic scales, play them till the strings leave imprints on the tips of your fingers and they burn like hell, then play them some more. When you get to the point that you are totally bored with what you are able to learn/create - buy a cheap Andre Segovia CD, and try to figure that out.







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personman Donating Member (959 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:53 AM
Response to Original message
19. Very Sexy Squier!
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/srs7/g=home/search/detai... /

Black and Chrome! Is that sexy or what?
It's also no more expensive then the other squiers.
I recommended this to another beginning guitar player and he seemed very happy with it.
If you buy one at a small local shop (assuming they even have this one) you will get raped. If you buy online you can use the extra $50 you save to get it set up correctly.
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bloodyjack Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:54 AM
Response to Original message
20. Start with an Acoustic, fo shizzle
Also I have a few 'instruction manuals' from years and years ago like Mel Bay's Guide to Classical Guitar and some tablature books. You should start with those. Let me reiterate that you simply MUST learn to read sheet music

I think I've already complimented you on your avatar.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:57 AM
Response to Reply #20
21. I definately will!
Definately not gonna cut corners or half-ass it here. I plan on doing it right.

Thanks, btw. Will Oldham is definately a huge inspiration :)
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whatelseisnew Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 11:05 AM
Response to Reply #20
46. I've got a couple of Mel Bay's books
Rhythm Guitar Chord System and Country, Folk & Bluegrass Guitar Tunings. Inherited them. But haven't learned to read them yet. I play by ear.
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Lostnote03 Donating Member (850 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 01:03 AM
Response to Original message
22. I have played guitar for 35 yrs......
.....spend roughly $200 on a Classical guitar(used)....this should place you in a lower grade Rosewood constructed guitar....go straight to a music store and purchase The Segovia Scales($10).....finger and string placement is notated with NO opinionated comfort zone.....Next read a biography of Andres Segovia for enlightment....You can always transfer your acquired skills to the electric if so desired.....You will be leagues ahead of those that have spent similar time with an electric....Best Wishes
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 01:09 AM
Response to Reply #22
23. alright, thanks!
I'll do that.
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JohnyCanuck Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 01:20 AM
Response to Original message
25. There is a really great book to help guide your practicing


I have been playing classical/finger style guitar off and on for about 35 years now and I just recently discovered "The Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar" by Jamey Andreas. I just wish to heck I had this book and the guidance and exercises it contained when I first started.

The author Jamey Andreas plays and teaches all styles of guitar from classical to rock, blues etc. and his book provides a series of exercises for building extremely fine muscle control and finger strength without unnecessary tension and strain which tends to limit dexterity and mobility of the fingers and hands. His exercises if practiced conscientiously will also help you avoid unknowingly building bad or counter-productive habits into your playing. The book contains exercises for right and left hand as well as for both finger style and pick style guitar playing.

The book also comes with an optional DVD as well to help illustrate the correct techniques involved in the various exercises. You will still need a teacher (the ideal situation) and/or other "teach yourself guitar" type books but get the book/DVD "Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar" and IMHO you will be giving yourself a great head start.

From the web site:
As you will see when you read "The Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar" you will learn:

how tension becomes "locked-in" to muscles when you practice without sufficient awareness....

how and why you adapt to that level of tension, how you are limited by it, and how, as time goes by, you consider it "normal".....

how you can cultivate "microscopic awareness", and how this awareness will allow you to practice with a new level of relaxation, "un-locking" the tension from the body, and how over time, muscle memory will help you build an entirely new foundation of technique....

how playing the guitar will become an entirely new experience. What seemed hard (because you were really fighting your own "locked-in" muscle tension) will now be, and feel, EASY!


I'll issue the standard disclaimer here. I am not affiliated with Jamey Andreas and don't stand to profit one iota from the sales of his material, but as a largely self taught guitarist, I do heartily recommend his book.

http://www.guitarprinciples.com/Book/further1.htm

Andreas also has a free email newsletter with playing and practicing tips which you can sign up for on the home page here:
http://www.guitarprinciples.com/index.html

Good luck MirrorAshes. The guitar is a fantastic instrument. I love it and I have never regretted the time I spent learning to play it that's for sure (even though I am still somewhat a half-assed amateur even after 35 years).
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 01:25 AM
Response to Reply #25
26. great, I'll check this out! thanks!
exactly the type of thing I'm looking for.
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Tandalayo_Scheisskopf Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:14 PM
Response to Reply #25
51. His concepts on tension...
Track so closely with oriental martial arts, it is remarkable.
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Misunderestimator Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:23 PM
Response to Reply #25
52. Thanks... I'm going to get that book.
Edited on Sat Jan-08-05 12:23 PM by Misunderestimator
Just got a new classical guitar for Christmas ( :loveya: nsma) and am learning to play. (Helps that I've played piano all my life.) Thanks for the tip. Sounds like a great book.
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PittPoliSci Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 01:27 AM
Response to Original message
28. do what i did...
i started with acoustic for a year or so, then i moved on to electric. don't buy anything too expensive, i'd say about 120 on an acoustic, then when you move over try something ibanez or fender squier.

that's what i did, then i bought a telecaster.

make sure you learn how to read music, and take lessons, it really helps.
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steely Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:07 AM
Response to Original message
30. sometimes the local high schools will offer classes at nite
for adult evening edumacation for like 30-40 bucks for a 10 week semester (1 nite/week). The one near me offers guitfiddle, dancing, aerobics, pottery, stuff like that - if yer low on dough, it's a good way to get decent lessons.

I signed up the second time last year - average age was (guessing) 35.
There were 20 people, men and women, youngest was with his mom, oldest was over 60. I'm in my 40's.

have fun
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Floogeldy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:10 AM
Response to Original message
31. If you have to ask . . .
. . . there's not much hope for you.

Just go get a damn guitar and chord book.
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Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:22 AM
Response to Reply #31
35. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
Floogeldy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:28 AM
Response to Reply #35
38. I'm just talking from experience
One has to be driven to play the guitar. It does not appear that you are.

That doesn't mean you are a bad person.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:29 AM
Response to Reply #38
41. What on earth gives you the right to say that?
If anything, this thread should be proof that I *AM* driven. Is looking for some advice on how to get started a crime? Seems logical and sensible to me.

But I guess I'm not a born guitar god, like you must be.
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Misunderestimator Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:25 PM
Response to Reply #38
53. Oh please... what is the degree of driven one must be?
How silly.
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bobthedrummer Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 11:08 AM
Response to Reply #35
47. HE MEANT THAT YOU AREN'T A NATURAL MUSICIAN FROM A
MUSICAL FAMILY-LIKE I AM.
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johnnie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:24 AM
Response to Reply #31
37. First beer?
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Name removed Donating Member (0 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 11:34 AM
Response to Reply #31
50. Deleted message
Message removed by moderator. Click here to review the message board rules.
 
porkrind Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:11 AM
Response to Original message
32. I taught myself
Just like you, I decided I wanted to learn how to play, so I went to a pawn shop and bought a cheap used electric, and the rest is history. :) I didn't know anything about it, even how to tune it. I didn't know anything about music, either, except that I had been in a couple of choirs. All I had was an appreciation of rock/metal style music. I started with simple sheet music with chords, and learned all the chord positions. Then I bought a book with some theory and learned more chords and some fingerstyle techniques. A long time later, I started into scales.

IMHO, scale theory is where the real treasure is to be found. I have played in a lot of bands, and had lots of gigs, and lots of fun, and I'm finally reaching "shredder" status. Some of the best Friends I have, I have because we share a love of the guitar. The guitar is a truly special instrument. Of course you know that already, that's why you're drawn to it the same way I was. :) Come on over to the DU musician's group forum and we'll treat you right. :) Having done what you are doing, I can offer the following advice:

1) Go for it!!! Go buy one tomorrow. You couldn't make a better decision than to pick up the guitar as a hobby. The guitar is a companion, a lifelong Friend, a puzzle of infinite complexity, a harsh taskmaster, and a thing of unspeakable beauty. Lucky you, most people will sadly never be interested in it.

2) You CAN teach yourself. I'm a person who likes figuring things out myself, so I didn't WANT any instruction. I'm difficult that way. :) It's easy.

3) Electric or acoustic: doesn't matter. At some point you will own several of both. :) An acoustic can be as easy as an electric to play, just tune the strings down 4 or 5 half-steps to take some of the tension out of the strings. This will make it easier on your virgin fingers.

4) If you can, go shopping with a guitarist, so they can check the instrument out and make sure it's straight, and plays well. You don't have to spend a lot, but it is important that you have a good instrument. If you are a mechanically inclined person with an eye for quality, you will know a good guitar by looking at it.

5) Get some instruction and theory books. Start with learning how to tune it. Then learn all the basic chords and their names. Develop some strumming techniques. Then learn barre chords. Then learn some right-hand picking techniques. Then delve into the wonderful world of scales. Understanding scales unlocks how chords are constructed. SCALE THEORY AND PRACTICE CANNOT BE OVEREMPHASIZED!!! From these single notes come an astounding array of intervals and an infinitude of chords and their inversions. You will learn the major and several minor scales, and the modes, which are really just inversions of the major scale. There are also lots of synthetic and exotic ethnic scales that are very cool. Once you've played these scales a million times, you intuitively know how they sound and you can improvise anything you can think. At this point you should also learn to read music.

6) Never compare yourself to other musicians. There are ALWAYS lots of guitarists that will never be as skilled as. There are also lots you will be more skilled than. Don't get into that mode of thinking. Just have fun and be positive. Be creative and start inventing your own music.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:24 AM
Response to Reply #32
36. you rock! thanks!
hehehe, im getting excited now =)
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asthmaticeog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:12 AM
Response to Original message
33. I didn't start playing guitar until I was 24.
So relax.

Acoustic or electric? Are you interested in folk, country? Rock, jazz, blues? That'll determine your choice.

Beyond that, take some lessons, play along with the records you like, don't get discouraged if you're not good right away, and make it fun for yourself. If it's not fun, it's not worth it.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:28 AM
Response to Reply #33
39. Cool, glad to know I'm not alone as a late starter
although, maybe I shouldn't even be thinking in those terms. You start when you start, I guess.

Ultimately I am most interested in creating quirky indie-rock-esque pop songs, so I'm trying to stay away from blues-rock, but I'm not against it or anything. I might even dabble a bit in the wilco-esque alt-country style, but I'm not sure about that either.
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asthmaticeog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 03:08 AM
Response to Reply #39
42. Oh, get an electric, then, no doubt.
Because you are most interested in creating quirky indie-rock-esque pop songs, I post for you this unfuckwithable masterpiece from 1/2 Japanese's guitarist David Fair, which, even though I know how to play "properly," is the basis of my unshakable faith in the redemptive power of the guitar.
__________________________________________________________________

How to play Guitar
by David Fair

I taught myself to play guitar. It's incredibly easy when you understand the science of it. The skinny strings play the high sounds, and the fat strings play the low sounds. If you put your finger on the string farther out by the tuning end it makes a lower sound. If you want to play fast, move your hand fast and if you want to play slower move your hand slower. That's all there is to it. You can learn the names of notes and how to make chords that other people use, but that's pretty limiting. Even if you took a few years and learned all the chords you'd still have a limited number of options. If you ignore the chords your options are infinite and you can master guitar playing in one day.

Traditionally, guitars have a fat string on the top and they get skinnier and skinnier as they go down. But the thing to remember is it's your guitar and you can put whatever you want on it. I like to put six different sized strings on it because that gives the most variety, but my brother used to put all of the same thickness on so he wouldn't have so much to worry about. What ever string he hit had to be the right one because they were all the same.

Tuning the guitar is kind of a ridiculous notion. If you have to wind the tuning pegs to just a certain place, that implies that every other place would be wrong. But that's absurd. How could it be wrong? It's your guitar and you're the one playing it. It's completely up to you to decide how it should sound. In fact I don't tune by the sound at all. I wind the strings until they're all about the same tightness.

I highly recommend electric guitars for a couple of reasons. First of all they don't depend on body resonating for the sound so it doesn't matter if you paint them. As also, if you put all the knobs on your amplifier on 10 you can get a much higher reaction to effort ratio with an electric guitar than you can with an acoustic. Just a tiny tap on the strings can rattle your windows, and when you slam the strings, with your amp on 10, you can strip the paint off the walls.

The first guitar I bought was a Silvertone. Later I bought a Fender Telecaster, but it really doesn't matter what kind you buy as long as the tuning pegs are on the end of the neck where they belong. A few years back someone came out with a guitar that tunes at the other end. I've never tried one. I guess they sound alright but they look ridiculous and I imagine you'd feel pretty foolish holding one. That would affect your playing. The idea isn't to feel foolish. The idea is to put a pick in one hand and a guitar in the other and with a tiny movement rule the world.
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MirrorAshes Donating Member (942 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 03:16 AM
Response to Reply #42
43. Awesome. Thank you.
Edited on Sat Jan-08-05 03:25 AM by MirrorAshes
I intend to learn all the technical stuff that I need to achieve the things I want to achieve, but at the heart of it is what you just posted. All I really want is a way to channel whats going on inside my head, a tool to explore my soul. I doubt I'll ever be a technical master, but I have no desire to be. I just want to write songs and play whatever comes out. Thanks again :)
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asthmaticeog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 03:24 AM
Response to Reply #43
45. Sweet! Welcome to the other side!
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chicagojoe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 02:28 AM
Response to Original message
40. Work with a metronome or click track from day one.
Develop meticulous time from the start.
P.S. It's Never Too Late !!!!
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WCGreen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 03:20 AM
Response to Original message
44. Costco has a couple of great guitars....
An Ovation Applause, which is both electrc and acoustic...

I played that guitar on stage for several years... Has the action of a good rhythm guitar and you can play it when the girls are around...

I played in High School and College but didn't get serious until I was about 29....

Play play play...

It's great fun.....
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Orsino Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 11:15 AM
Response to Original message
48. Consider an electric...
...as an acoustic will limit you to 20-30 minutes, at first, until those calluses grow.
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RetroLounge Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 11:31 AM
Response to Original message
49. A couple of words of advice
Don't buy a cheap quality guitar!

I would suggest buying a nice acoustic first, until you learn a bit. But an ovation or some sort of electric acoustic (E/A) is good too. I have owned many mnay guitars over the years, and have some knowledge of them.

Yamaha makes an okay E/A, washburn is good, ovation is better.

If you go electric, research and play many before you buy. What kind of music do you want to play? Metal? Blues? Rock? Pop? Disco?

What bands do you admire? What are their guitarists playing?

I have owned strats and teles, and washburns, and ibanez' and gibsons, and many others. A Strat is a nice guitar for all around playing, any kind of music. A Tele has a more distinct sound and feel and they are still nice.

Now, a Gibson Les Paul, well, I could go on... My first electric was a 1978 Black Gibson Les Paul Custom, and after buying and selling some 30+ guitars over the years, I still have it. I even have the headstock symbol tatooed on my arm. So you can guess my preference...



Take lessons, learn to read music, TAB, etc., and train your ear.

Good luck, and Practice, Practice, PRACTICE!

RL
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porkrind Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 05:05 PM
Response to Reply #49
55. "I even have the headstock symbol tatooed on my arm."
Now THAT'S commitment and dedication. :)
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RetroLounge Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-09-05 02:51 PM
Response to Reply #55
57. And I did it while sober.
:D

RL
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LifeDuringWartime Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 12:28 PM
Response to Original message
54. if/when you go for it
and you start practicing, start slowly. dont play so fast, so hard, and for so long that your wrist/hand hurts. if that happens, stop. you defintely dont want carpal tunnel
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pink-o Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-08-05 05:21 PM
Response to Original message
56. It is NEVER too late!
Really. I first played guitar at age 12, but took up piano serioutly at 17--everyone said I was too old, because your fingers aren't as flexible once you're out of childhood. But coming to it as an adult means you're gonna practice more, you're gonna be able to get your head around musical concepts that escape kids (most kids just do it by rote, and only stick with it if they have an epiphany that they want to be in a band later)

Also, this is a generalisation, but there are bascially 2 kinds of musicians: those that read well, and those that fake better! The readers are the technical perfectionists of their instruments, and can awesomely play anything you put in front of them. The fakers are the creative ones, who get by with the basics but usually write songs that fit their level of ability. The songs they create are rawer and more evocative than the techies. (There are exceptions--Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin is incredibly technical, and played sessions for years, but boy, could he write! However, Pete Townshend got by with only chords, let his bass man play lead, and gave us amazing gems. John Lennon too!)

Let me finish with this, Mirror Ashes. Art is subjective. No one can put rules and regs on it, your output is as valid as anyone else's and if you love it, that's reason enough. Ignore the judgemental posts and have a blast!!!!
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Misunderestimator Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-09-05 03:24 PM
Response to Reply #56
59. There are plenty of brilliant musicians who fall into both categories.
I don't think they are exceptions. I think they are a third category.
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Astrochimp Donating Member (212 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-09-05 03:18 PM
Response to Original message
58. step one....
buy guitar, strings,a tunner and a finger excercise /scale beginers book.( you can also find that on the net for free)

step two- practice that till you can, tune, play for 30 min non stop, and kinda do all the excercises.

step 3 ONLY THEN take lesons. Nothing sucks more than trying to teach when the student can't hold down the strings, or cries 'my hands are sore' 3 min into the leson.


I would also add not to look at your hands when you play- sure it will take time, but if you have to practice in the dark, you must learn this!!!

IMHO a electric is better as you can "noodle" while watching TV with out an amp and not bother others-

The fender squire starter packs are good for you, but buy used (sheap<G> ;) or buy from a local real music store (not mega chain) so they can do the basic set-up, plus you will also devlop a relationship with someone who can answer questions and give help when needed.

David
"chicks dig bass players"

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