Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

need some help with a "chewing" dog

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » The DU Lounge Donate to DU
 
radfringe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 04:37 AM
Original message
need some help with a "chewing" dog
our 8 year old Airdale (DAX) has taken to chewing up her rear hip -- previously it was her foot -- fur missing, and "sores"

she's been to the vet - no skin problems/parasites etc.
Vet gave us some "bangard" stuff to put on it, suppose to taste awful and discourage dog from licking/chewing -- Dax doesn't care, licks it anyway (Sour Apple/bitter apple doesn't work on her either)

we've given her a bath, put on the bangard, and have tried various anti-itch sprays for dogs -- none of it seems to work

last night I doused the areas with Sulfadene, and did my best to bandage and wrap the area -- she seems ok this morning. Any suggestions on what else I can use/do?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
huellewig Donating Member (700 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 04:42 AM
Response to Original message
1. It sucks but we had to do this in the past.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Cooley Hurd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 05:04 AM
Response to Original message
2. Airedales are very-easily "bored" dogs...
...and have a tendency to act "compulsively," such as barking, digging and even chewing themselves. A doggie behavior specialist might be in order (I had to consult one when Charlie wouldn't stop eating holes in my walls!)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
kodi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 08:21 AM
Response to Reply #2
8. i have seen it with irish setters too.
perhaps another dog in the house would help with the boredom. dogs are communal animals and do not take well to isolation.

with 6 dogs, none of mine get bored.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mirandaod Donating Member (437 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 05:06 AM
Response to Original message
3. Our Airedale had skin problems, too.
It was probably an allergy to something, but we never found out what, exactly. It possibly could have been a severe flea allergy, but we consistently treated him and the house. However, the vet did say that if the allergy was severe enough, even one bite when he was outside would cause a reaction. The vet occasionally would give him a shot of prednisone or something that would calm him down and allow some healing in the area above his tail. But you can't use steroids except on a very occasional basis.
I wish you luck - it's a real problem. Give your baby a kiss on the head for me.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
China_cat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 05:32 AM
Response to Original message
4. Check the ingredients in his food
Have you also been having ear problems? 'Ears and rears' is usually a sign of allergies and the biggest offender in that regard is ground yellow corn.

We had the same problem with our oldest Bouvier until we found a food with no ground yellow corn. It took about 2 weeks of eating it but she stopped chewing and has never started again.

Finding a food with no corn isn't easy, and it's not cheap. But what we've saved on vet bills has more than made up for it.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
radfringe Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 06:36 AM
Response to Reply #4
6. no food problems
she's been on the same stuff for over a year, and this has been a problem (on/off) for past couple of years

we had to switch dogs onto Pedigree -- our greyhound has a "crystal belly" which usually emerges from the back end as the runs -- since we can't seperate the food and guarantee that each will only eat his/her food -- they are both on the same diet

might try using a "cone-head" -- although she's pretty agile and smart -- will have to figure out a way to attach it so she can't get it off

had a dog, years ago, that had to wear a cone while recovering from a tail amputation -- cones that the vet gave us were off in minutes -- ended up using a soft plastic trash can -- cut a hole in the bottom, over her head, then anchored it to her collar -- it was the only thing that worked

unfortunately, the only "soft plastic" can I could find was in an electric lime green -- not easy on our eyes -- but it worked
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
sweetheart Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 07:09 AM
Response to Reply #6
7. Might be worth a try: "Missing Link"
One of my older dogs used to nip at her behind, and limp a bit
sometimes, but this behaviour ended entirely when i started using
this food supplement:

http://www.designinghealth.com/products/canine_products...

I know 2 other friends with older dogs who would make the same
claim. Proper nutrition is often root to symptoms that appear from
other causes.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
bullimiami Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 06:02 AM
Response to Original message
5. what worked with our doxie
I made her a little body suit. couldnt get to the areas to chew.
i think a muzzle or a cone on the head would work too.

after it is healed take it off. if they want to start chewing again. back on.

ours was all chewed around the thighs and stomach. all healed and hair grown back now.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
jukes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 08:53 AM
Response to Original message
9. i think this might
be a behavioral problem from boredom. he cd prb use a doggie or kittie playmate.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
radwriter0555 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 09:04 AM
Response to Original message
10. tranquilizer. Acefran is very good for calming, taking them off the "rat
wheel." My aussie/cocker mix is obsessive compulsive; she joneses on her tennis balls or food, so we slip her a mickey once a week to take the edge off. She had slipped a disc and was nearly paralyzed with her ball obsession, so that turned us on to the tranqs. They get wobbly eyed and sleep the first time.

Now when I notice her getting aggressive (she's off the tennis ball and kept inactive) about food, I slip her a pill (wrapped in a small ball of cheese) and she chills out. Seriously the effects last for almost a week.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Fri Jul 25th 2014, 06:41 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » The DU Lounge Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC