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I'm thinking of playing poker in a casino.

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Mojambo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 01:58 AM
Original message
I'm thinking of playing poker in a casino.
I've been a regular online poker player for a few months now and I'm thinking about hitting a few live tournaments at local casinos.

Is anybody an experinced tournament player? Advice?

I know the game pretty well, but I'm not familiar with table ettiquette and other aspects particular to tournament play.

Anybody play?
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aquaman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 02:00 AM
Response to Original message
1. you will lose.......
But it will be fun to do so.
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Mojambo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 02:02 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Only a fool goes in thinking they'll win. n/t
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lapfog_1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 02:40 AM
Response to Reply #2
5. Ummm

no. I ALWAYS believe I'm going to win. Otherwise why waste the
money on the entry? Really, it's like any sport or competition,
believe that you can win, that you are a "winning player", etc.
Not to the point of arrogance (like, say, Phil Helmuth), but with
self confidence (even it it's a bit forced). In live play, a *LOT*
of players can pick up on body language... if they feel that you are
"playing to lose" or just unsure of yourself, they will try to pick
you off by raising you with bluffing (or semi-bluff) hands. Kind
of like a pack of jackals taking down the weakest herd member.

I've come back from having just 1 chip left to win a major
tournament (the old "chip and a chair" rule)... so never give up
either.

Believe in your reads of other players hands, know when they are
bluffing you. Be prepared to bluff some yourself.

I've played just about every big tournament there is, and currently
make a very modest living playing mid-level live action poker
(Holdem mostly).
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Mojambo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 02:41 AM
Response to Reply #5
6. I was speaking specifically of the first tournament one enters. n/t
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lapfog_1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 02:50 AM
Response to Reply #6
7. If one believes the story

Chris Moneymakers FIRST live tournament was the 2003 WSOP main
event... and of course, he won $2.5 Million. All from a $40 dollar
online super satellite.

Quite possible.

I also believe in beginners luck in live play too. The deck just
seems to run over first time players.
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Lefty48197 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 07:15 AM
Response to Reply #6
10. I got second place in my first tournament ever
In fact, it was my first poker game ever. The next game/tournament, I won. Think positive, and believe that making the proper decision EVERY SINGLE TIME will give you a chance at winning. Winning poker tournaments is like throwing a no-hitter in baseball. You've got to be at the top of your game to do it, but you also need some help from those around you, and luck helps too. GOOD LUCK!
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lapfog_1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 02:17 AM
Response to Original message
3. OK here are a few tips

1. Pick up Mike Caro's Book of Tells.

2. Don't act out of turn, even if you are going to muck.

3. Announce raise before raising (that way no one can call you
for string bets)

4. If it's no limit, announce the amount of the raise.

5. Show your hand down in turn on the river. Don't call your
hand, let the cards "speak". Don't slow roll.

6. If you get beat, don't throw cards or make remarks... even
if provoked.

7. Be VERY careful of any nervous hand motions, those can be
taken as either a check or a bet, depending. If you have chips
in your hand, and you make a motion toward the pot, depending
on the casino and the tournament director, it could be a "bet"
even if you meant to check or muck.

8. If you win, tip the dealers and the tourney director... something
like 5 percent or so.

9. Have fun. Anyone can win, but if you are used to online play,
typical live tournaments play somewhat tighter...

10. Try to (silently) read other players hands. Pay attention to
every hand whether you play or not (I'm sure you do this in the
online play).

11. Have fun!
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Mojambo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 02:24 AM
Response to Reply #3
4. Great stuff.
Thank you very much!
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curlyred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 08:55 AM
Response to Reply #3
11. what would you say are the differences online v B&M?
besides sitting at a table with real people, that is.

I've played poker for years in little friend and family games but recently started playing tourneys on line. 3 tables. Have had fairly good success. We're going to Vegas in a few months and I am a little nervous about playing in a live game.....

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Awsi Dooger Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 03:04 AM
Response to Original message
8. Another tip
Set aside a significant period of time to sit down and play, so you don't have to force hands.

I live in Las Vegas and my friends bet sports and play poker for a living. They specifically target games known for tourists, or infrequent players, who don't have much time and therefore want to score a big pot and leave. I almost never hear my friends mocking unfamiliar players who play too few hands, but the opposite is virtually a daily guarantee.
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Dookus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-14-04 03:20 AM
Response to Original message
9. The best book on tournament poker
Edited on Sun Nov-14-04 03:20 AM by Dookus
is TJ Cloutier's. You should be able to find it in most places now that poker is big.

Years ago, I won a small satellite and found myself playing a $300 buy-in tournament. I bought TJ's book, read it the night before, and placed 2nd in the tournament, bringing home a few thousan dollars - it was my first serious poker win. I've won or placed in lots of tournaments since then, and read all the books.

TJ's is the best. Don't ruin your mind with Doyle Brunson's book until you've been playing a few years.

on edit; Oh, and good luck!
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