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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 02:42 PM
Original message
Henry V (Branagh) soundtrack
I am sort of watching the end of this movie. I am loving the soundtrack. Does anyone have it or know if any recording might be worthwhile for purchase? Sometimes I have been disappointed by sound tracks when I buy them. Just wondering.
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hlthe2b Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 02:46 PM
Response to Original message
1. Yes... I have it along with Branagh's Hamlet sountrack
Edited on Wed Aug-25-04 02:47 PM by hlthe2b
Both are Sir Patrick Doyle-- a wonderful musician and producer of film scores. Both are available on CD from Amazon.com and elsewhere. If you like Henry V, you will absolutely like the sountrack to Branah's Hamlet. Enjoy!
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 02:52 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. Thanks!
I hate to waste money just because I liked a few things and I have not been paying attention but some of it drew my attention and that always means good things. Was this the "new" Hamlet that he did? I took a bunch of 5th graders and 7th graders to see that. I liked it but do not remember the soundtrack. All I remember is the one question I was asked after it was over. 7th grader looks at me and say, "I would probably have liked it if they talked in normal words." It took everything I had in me not to totally crack up.

Ahh Sir Patrick Doyle, no wonder.
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hlthe2b Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 03:06 PM
Response to Reply #2
3. re: Branagh's Hamlet
Edited on Wed Aug-25-04 03:07 PM by hlthe2b
That was the long (complete) version that he did about 1996, shot in 70mm wide screen (you'd undoubtedly have remembered the panoramic view of the celebration of Hamlet's mother's marriage to his uncle, the king, in the castle-- complete with vivid colors and confetti that seemed to shower down without end. It was well over 3 1/2 hours as I recall and the only version that totally includes all of Shakespeare's play. I think it was released briefly on VHS, but never on DVD, which is a shame.

I own both soundtracks and like to listen to them whenever I really want to get caught up by my music. Both have that effect. Doyle had to step away for some time after doing the Hamlet soundtract, but is back now scoring. (He is in remission with leukemia, I believe) A very talented guy, who really seemed to mesh well with Branagh.
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 03:28 PM
Response to Reply #3
6. Was that the one
with Robin Williams, Jack Lemmon and a bunch of other Hollywood actors? Sorry, I was supervising 5th and 7th graders who were very bored so I did not have the luxury of really watching it closely.
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hlthe2b Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 04:26 PM
Response to Reply #6
9. Yes, both were in there & were interesting casting, which included
Edited on Wed Aug-25-04 04:33 PM by hlthe2b
considerable star casting in secondary roles (e.g., Charlton Heston, Lennon, Williams, John Gielgud, Billy Crystal (funny performance as the gravedigger), Gerard Depardieu (spp?) and others). But, Julie Christie as Gertrude and Sir Derek Jacobi as Claudius, Kate Winslet as Ophelia and Branagh as Hamlet gave the more impressive perfomances. Of course, you had to get accustomed to Branagh as a "blonde!" If you want the definitive Hamlet, Branagh's is it. You may be able to rent the VHS video if interested and have a few hours to spare...
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 06:34 PM
Response to Reply #9
15. Thanks
I love Sir Derek Jacobi. I do remember that KB was a blonde, he is a cutie and I do remember what I saw I did enjoy. I appreciate the info.
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LanternWaste Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 03:14 PM
Response to Original message
4. It's a great soundtrack!
It's a great soundtrack. The portion where Branagh gives his soliloquy in the movie is very moving and the choral at the end is fantastic. By all means, get a copy of it! :P
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 03:27 PM
Response to Reply #4
5. Yes, that really
caught my ear! It just kept building and it is such a lovely melody. I looked up and he was carrying a dead comrade (sorry, I have no idea who it was I was not really watching and don't know the play well enough) and it was so moving. Looks like this is one I will need to get as well as watching it again, I will learn the play. This is one of the things I have set as a goal, learn more Shakespeare, I am woefully uneducated about his writing but I love the language so I am going to attempt to learn more. Thanks, I will get it.
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LanternWaste Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 03:39 PM
Response to Reply #5
7. Try Love's Labor's Lost, too
In all honesty, I checked out Henry V from Blockbuster on a whim in the early 90's. Never really was into Shakespeare too much prior to that, but KB's movie served as a sort of catalyst for me and I even went so far as to take three evening courses on him.

For a real hoot, try watching KB's/Shakespeare's- Love's Labour's Lost. The Shakespearean language is present, but the play is set in 1939 France just prior to WWII and uses Cole Porter songs as the backdrop to actual song/dance routines. It's pretty damn funny (and who knew Alicia Silverstone could actually act?) :)
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 03:46 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. KB amuses me,
he is so good for this Shakespeare novice. I will try it. I also loved his Much Ado About Nothing. Michael Keaton was pretty funny in it. Cole Porter huh? Very interesting. I saw a great show by Al Pacino the other week called Finding Richard. It was fascinating and answered many questions I had about that play.
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hlthe2b Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 04:36 PM
Response to Reply #8
10. Doyle did the Much Ado About Nothing Soundtrack as well.... eom
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LanternWaste Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 04:39 PM
Response to Reply #10
11. The ending of Much Ado was a bit...
The ending was a bit... "Disney-esque" for me (the line of dancers snaking their way through the garden), but Doyle's soundtrack made up for it. :)
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 06:36 PM
Response to Reply #11
16. I thought that
was kinda dumb myself, the ending that is. However I do think it was appropriate. I don't remember that soundtrack, DUH! Sometimes I think that if you don't notice it it is really good. I think that play has been on cable a lot lately, I will try to catch it again.
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CBHagman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 05:49 PM
Response to Reply #8
14. Please see Branagh in Othello, too.
Branagh didn't direct that version of the play (I think Oliver Parker did), but he so dominates the proceedings as Iago that he threatens to steal the whole thing from Laurence Fishburne.

I remember reading Othello in high school and rather idiotically focusing on Iago as a villain. It wasn't until I saw the stage production years later and then the recent film that I remembered that Iago has to be witty and rather seductive in order to pull the whole deception off. And Branagh makes it look so easy.


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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 06:38 PM
Response to Reply #14
17. I have never
seen that one or read it, thanks. I don't remember appreciating Shakespeare when in High School. Only as I have gotten older and much smarter than I was then do I realize how beautiful the language is and how interesting the plays are. I will look for that one.
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Lydia Leftcoast Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 05:41 PM
Response to Original message
12. My church choir back in Portland
augmented by about two dozen singers from the Portland Gay Men's Chorus, sang the choral piece ("Non Nobis Domine"--"Not to us, o Lord, but to thee be all glory") at the ordination to the priesthood of a gay man who had done his transitional deacon year (sort of an internship for priests) at our parish.

The piece is scored for men's voices, of course, so we women all sang the first tenor part, which was well within our ranges. :-)
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 06:39 PM
Response to Reply #12
18. That must have been very
moving to sing that. I was thinking it would be fun to do, perhaps I will suggest that to our conductor as something for the orchestra and a chorus.
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CBHagman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 05:45 PM
Response to Original message
13. I love Doyle's soundtrack to Henry V
My favorite segment is the accompaniment to the Agincourt speech ("We few, we happy few..."), but "Non Nobis Domine" (sung after the battle and over the closing credits) also is particularly memorable.

Doyle's soundtrack for Much Ado about Nothing was interesting in that he literally wrote an old-fashioned overture with the individual themes worked into it ("Pardon, Goddess of the Night," "Sigh No More, Ladies," etc.).

And don't forget that Doyle also wrote the soundtrack to Indochine (very recognizably a Doyle score) and Sense and Sensibility (a truly wonderful movie, in every respect).
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MuseRider Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Aug-25-04 06:41 PM
Response to Reply #13
19. I remember
the music to Sense and Sensibility, I loved that movie. Thanks for the info on the soundtrack for Much Ado, sounds like he did it like an opera.
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