Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

roaches, palmetto or water bugs?

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » The DU Lounge Donate to DU
 
mrbill Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 06:38 AM
Original message
roaches, palmetto or water bugs?
Edited on Sat Aug-30-03 06:48 AM by mrbill
What do you call them in your neck of the woods?

Are they the same insect or what?

Are they out to take over thw world?

Water bugs here in north texas. Daughter calls them giant roaches. They are too big to check into a roach motel.

With smart cats boric acid works. Roaches can't fart, it makes gas and they explode.

Down the drain with hot water doesn't work unless there's a garbge disposal.

Not squeemish about using the foot, remember that they feel the air pressure coming and adjust your aim.

These little critters engage my hunting instinct.

on edit: typo





Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
trumad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 06:40 AM
Response to Original message
1. They're God's creatures
how can you hurt those poor innocent animals? ;-)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mrbill Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 06:41 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. they are innocent outside the house
come inside and they get their head on a toothpick.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Bake Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 07:13 AM
Response to Original message
3. God's creatures or not
I'm gonna crush the m'f-ers if I get the chance. They're out to take over the world.

Bake
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
trof Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 07:18 AM
Response to Original message
4. To homeowners they're ROACHES.
To realtors showing a house they're "Palmetto Bugs".
Doesn't that sound nicer?
Inside or out, they die!
An outside roach is just on his way inside.
Like the boric acid/no-fart thesis.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
nuxvomica Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 09:18 AM
Response to Original message
5. Have you ever tried orange oil cleaner on them?
Edited on Sat Aug-30-03 09:19 AM by nuxvomica
I use it as an insecticide around the house because it's safe for the cat (and me!) but it'll stop wasps dead and when you spray it on an ant, all this foam starts coming out of them. I'm wondering what it might do to la cucaracha.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
SaintLouisBlues Donating Member (755 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 09:30 AM
Response to Reply #5
6. Roaches in the city, water bugs in the 'burbs
That's the joke in St. Louis. I believe that the big, dark brown ones are known as America
cockroaches, that that a lot of people call these waterbugs.

It is those smaller, speedier reddish ones (German cockroaches) that drive people to distraction. The
big ones are easier to control and don't seem to infest in the large numbers that the Germans do.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
morningglory Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 12:07 PM
Response to Reply #5
13. Any soap kills a roach,
interferes with the waxy coating on their exo-skeleton. They turn right over and die. One time I sprayed windex on a roach and it went insane and stalked me for hours. Once I was visiting someone and while they were out, I put a dish in the dishwasher. There was a big cockroach crawling around in there. I had never owned an electric dishwasher, so I didn't know they do not tolerate regular dishwashing liquid. I grabbed the dishwashing liquid and tried to squirt him. One drop kills them immediately. Of course the thing ran around among the racks and dishes and I had to squirt quite a bit of the soap before I got him. So then I turned the machine on and it was like a scene from the Woody Allen movie where he was a robot in the future and made the custard that glooped and got bigger and filled the whole kitchen. I mopped up soap suds for hours.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
nuxvomica Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 12:30 PM
Response to Reply #13
15. Windex? You must be Greek
;-)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
caledesi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 11:44 AM
Response to Original message
7. Here goes...In Virgina, they are called Waterbugs and they are huge!
In Florida, they are called roaches, unless you are old and rich, then they are called Palmetto bugs (they don't like to use the term "roach."
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
FlaGranny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 11:53 AM
Response to Original message
8. There's a critter called a water bug
and if you see one don't touch it. They are big nasty critters and they can bite. Definitely not a roach.

http://www.insects.org/entophiles/hemiptera/hemi_005.ht...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
ForrestGump Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 12:05 PM
Response to Reply #8
12. These dudes are true bugs
'Bugs' as a generic term for insects is, zoologically, totally wrong. Not that entomologists don't still call 'em 'bugs' at times.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
morningglory Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 12:01 PM
Response to Original message
9. Water bugs and Palmetto bugs are what we tell the tourists they are,
actually I don't even know what a water bug is, and here in Florida we have an intimate familiarity with MANY bugs. Palmetto bugs are real bugs: large, sectioned, wingless slow-crawling fat things that actually live in palmetto plants out in the woods, but there are 2 kinds of roaches in my mind: BIG ones and little ones. I think the little ones are called German cockroaches. (Don't know what they call them in Germany) The big ones eat the little ones' eggs. If you kill the last big one, you will get infested with little ones, especially if you buy a used appliance in Florida. Or borrow a radio. I live in Florida. Ask me anything.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
FlaGranny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 12:17 PM
Response to Reply #9
14. Oh yeah?
;-) - did you ever get an infestation of those huge carpenter ants? Believe it or not, I had them once in a table lamp and another time in a radio. I lived very close to the woods then. Then another time swarms just started coming out of the walls. They are nearly as bad as termites.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
ForrestGump Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 12:01 PM
Response to Original message
10. Probably all used interchangeably, but in the US the
three most common cockroaches are the classic American, the smaller and darker Asian/Oriental, and the way smaller German. The Oriental cockroach is more often called 'waterbug,' I believe, but all species are called waterbug at different times in different places. In other words, the common names are largely meaningless - that's why we have scientific names. They're all cockroaches and the 'polite' term in some areas of the South and Caribbean is 'palmetto bug.'

Here's some info on a few US species:

http://www.allabouthome.com/tips/pests/cockroaches.html

And this next page is pretty interesting. A mong other things, cockroaches relieve us of our pesky nail-care duties:

"They can feed just as freely on...the finger and toenails of sleeping humans."

And this appetite-inspiring tidbit:

"Cockroaches have the habit of dropping their feces wherever they go. They discharge a liquid both from the mouth and openings on their body, which gives off a "cockroach" odor to food and dishes they walk over. Believe it or not, cockroaches find this foul smell very attractive."

http://ag.udel.edu/extension/information/hyg/hyg-08.htm

Finally, just found this page on the etymology of cockroach names - that's right, entomological etymology:

http://www.cnf.ca/naturecanada/autumn00/nc_f00_words.ht...
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
notadmblnd Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Aug-30-03 12:03 PM
Response to Original message
11. They're Roachs
discusting, nasty, disease carrying pests and here in the midwest is a sign of filth in a house. HouseFlys are just as bad.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Sat Sep 20th 2014, 04:34 PM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » The DU Lounge Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC