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How do I keep my winter clothes spring fresh in storage? Use a dessicant?

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Kolesar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:05 AM
Original message
How do I keep my winter clothes spring fresh in storage? Use a dessicant?
I have plastic boxes loaded with coats, heavy shirts, and sweaters that I put away until November. Is there some sort of dessicant I can put in there so that moisture does not condense in there and give it that musty smell? I would imagine there are some sort of salts like those "do not eat" capsules that come in a pill bottle. I would expect you could drive the moisture out of them by putting them in the oven for a while, then place them in with the clothes where they will absorb humidity.
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dusty64 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:05 AM
Response to Original message
1. Throw dryer
Edited on Sat May-29-04 11:06 AM by dusty64
sheets in there and those refridge boxes of baking soda.
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Kolesar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:16 AM
Response to Reply #1
5. The box says baking soda absorbs unpleasant odors in the refrigerator
That seems like a similar action.
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dusty64 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:23 AM
Response to Reply #5
7. Yeah, I love em
and they ought to absorb the moisture and help keep it fresh. The dryer sheets will also help make them smell good.
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nothingshocksmeanymore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:07 AM
Response to Original message
2. Go buy a cedar block
you can get it at any Savon or similar store..put it in the container with the clothes
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Kolesar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:11 AM
Response to Reply #2
3. That will keep the bugs out
It will make is smell nice, too.
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nothingshocksmeanymore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:15 AM
Response to Reply #3
4. Bugs need moisture to survive so yes, it helps
It is mostly effective with moths and absorbs moisture so mildew cannot form and yes..I like the smell...for an entire container of clothes..about a 4 by 1 by 2 inch chunk should be sufficient...if you live in a very humid environment, you want to make sure the piece is not too small.
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Kolesar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:20 AM
Response to Reply #4
6. Cedar and cypress trees are amazingly rot resistant
They grow in flooded land. There used to be huge stands of cypress trees in Florida, but they got cut down and used for construction of docks and similar structures. So many were cut that the remaining were protected. You cannot find cypress wood (unless it is illegally harvested). Cedar is still available, though.
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nothingshocksmeanymore Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:23 AM
Response to Reply #6
8. I appreciate your environmental advocacy
Asa guitar player, the same thing has happened with precious woods that guitars are made of. The development of the rainforest has made Brazilian Rosewood (which many fine acoustics are made of) more rare.
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Red State Rebel Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat May-29-04 11:23 AM
Response to Original message
9. Stay Dry
There is a product called Stay Dry or some similar spelling that is a dessicant sold at grocery/Walmart type stores. It is in a container that lets it absorb moisture from the air and drip into the bottom if it has too much. Since they are in enclosed plastic I would think you could divide the stuff up and put it into a piece of pantyhose or something to absorb any moisture.

Also, when we had a house fire 2 years ago, the fire restoration company that came in to clean told me that in all the jobs they have done they have never seen smoke or water damage in a closed rubbermaid storage bin. I don't use anything else now.
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