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In what election did Blacks generally switch from Republican to Democrat?

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Some Moran Donating Member (675 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 02:21 PM
Original message
In what election did Blacks generally switch from Republican to Democrat?
1948?
1960?
1968?

Just wondering. :)
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DUreader Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 02:23 PM
Response to Original message
1. In what election were Blacks generally allowed to vote and...
have said votes counted?
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salin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 03:22 PM
Response to Reply #1
9. sadly... not fully until the sixties... ending in Fla in 2000
:(
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5thGenDemocrat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 02:23 PM
Response to Original message
2. 1936
Edited on Wed Nov-26-03 02:24 PM by 5thGenDemocrat
After the first four years of FDR's New Deal.
John
Plus, I doubt ol' Alf ("The Kansas Sunflower") Landon had much street cred.
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Faygo Kid Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 02:26 PM
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3. 1964 cemented it
They had seen enough of the Repukes by then. Still getting hammered by them; hard to believe.
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jiacinto Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 02:31 PM
Response to Original message
4. 1934
That's when the black Republican representing the south side of Chicago lost.
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the_real_38 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 02:45 PM
Response to Original message
5. Blacks weren't really allowed to vote in the South..
... until the 60's. They never made up a significant voting block before the voting rights act
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salin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 03:23 PM
Response to Reply #5
10. and Jeb! is working hard to turnback the hands of time
to prevent floridian blacks from being a significant voting block now and in the future.
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tom_paine Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 03:02 PM
Response to Original message
6. IT'S DEMOCRATIC! IC! IC! DAMNIT!
Sorry to shout, but we should not be uttering Totalitarian Talking Points.

It was Bushevik Gingrich and his band of psychomanipulators who decided that the "Democratic Party" was the "Democrat Party".

Let's not help them in their pernicious ways.
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jarab Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 03:12 PM
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7. 1948
Paraphrased from "The New American Democracy"- Fiorina & Peterson:

All through the thirties the Repub stranglehold was beginning to diminish, thanks to the new deal policies.
By 1948, it was no longer clear which party would get the black votes - a tossup. Truman (whose private language was sprinkled with racial slurs), from the former slave state and never a civil rights enthusiast, appealed to the black voter for his/her vote.
In this knowledge, Truman called for abolition of poll tax, protection of black voting rights, creation of FEPC, and integration of armed foces, etc.
Two thirds support from blacks helped carry OH, Il, and CA. Without these states, Dewey won. In 1948 the NAACP began to win some important SC decisions.
1948 was the first election since 1876 in which blacks were a significant force nationally.

............
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Deaner1971 Donating Member (124 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Nov-26-03 03:22 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. 60s?
I know that when the Civil Rights Act was signed, LBJ said "this has lost us the South for a generation".He was referring to the (mostly) white Southern Democratic politicians who were against the Civil Rights Act. It lead to the "Dixie-crats" so, I would think that if anything, this cemented the bond.
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