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tocqueville Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-20-05 04:03 PM
Original message
ROVE : etymology = can't be printed here
rove
verb roved, roving

intr
1. To roam about aimlessly.

Thesaurus: roam, wander, ramble, stray, drift, meander, range, stroll, traipse, gallivant; Antonym: stay.
2. To wander over or through (a particular area, place, etc).
intr
3. Said of the eyes: to keep looking in different directions; to wander.

noun

1. The act of roving.

Etymology: 16c: perhaps ultimately from Scandinavian.
_______________________________________________________
and in Scandinavian (Swedish, Danish) :

http://g3.spraakdata.gu.se/saob /

ETYMOLOGI: < fsv. [b>rva; jfr fd. ru, rva (d. rve), nor. dial. ryva, riva av, isl. reyfa, genomborra, riva, plundra, raufa, genomborra, bryta hl p, bryta upp ngt fr att kunna underska det l. fr att bereda sig tilltrde, got. biraubn, berva, fsax. rbn, rva (mlt. rven, lt. roven, rowen, roben), ffris. rvia, birēva, berva, fht. roubn, rva (t. rauben), feng. rēafian, rva (eng. reave); till stammen i fsv. riuva, snderbryta, snderriva, isl. rjfa, bryta hl p, feng. rēofan, bryta, riva, till den ieur. rot som frelig ger i lat. rumpere, bryta, beslktad med den under RAGG, sbst.1, nmnda roten; bet. 'plundra' o. d. i de nordiska sprken kan mjl. bero p ln frn mlt.; i sv. (o. dan.) kan hela ordet mjl. vara en ombildning av (det frn mlt. lnade) ROVA, v., gm anslutning till (de sannol. frn mlt. lnade) RVARE o. RVERI.

rva : steal
rvare : robber


rove

"to wander with no fixed destination," 1536, possibly a Midlands dialectal variant of northern Eng. and Scottish rave "to wander, stray," from M.E. raven, probably from O.N. rafa "to wander, rove." Infl. by rover (q.v.). Earliest sense was "to shoot arrows at a mark selected at pleasure or at random" (1474).
rover
1390, "sea-robber, pirate," from M.Du. rover "robber, predator, plunderer," especially in zeerovere "pirate," lit. "sea-robber," from roven "to rob," from M.Du. root "spoil, plunder," related to O.E. reaf "spoil, plunder," reafian "to reave" (see reft).

2 entries found for reave.
To select an entry, click on it.
reave<1,verb>reave<2,transitive verb>

Main Entry: 1reave
Pronunciation: 'rEv
Function: verb
Inflected Form(s): reaved or reft /'reft/; reaving
Etymology: Middle English reven, from Old English rEafian; akin to Old High German roubOn to rob, Latin rumpere to break
intransitive senses : PLUNDER, ROB
transitive senses
1 archaic a (1) : ROB, DESPOIL (2) : to deprive one of b : SEIZE
2 archaic : to carry or tear away
- reaver noun


and the best of all in Swedish : RV = asshole (check any dictionary)

RV Svenska Akademien, uppdaterad:2005-06-28

SPALT:

UTTAL: r4v, v. (numera bl. i vissa trakter, bygdemlsfrgat) RV r4v, sbst.2,
GENUS: r. l. f.
BJNING: best. -en ( NorrlS 10: 30 1635 osv.) ( () -an ngermDomb. 1639, fol. , VDAkt. 1680, nr 325 (1676)); pl. -ar. (rf; i ssg 1912 (: rfkrok). rfwen, sg. best. 1636. rv (rf, rff) 1572 osv. rvv- i ssg 1949 (: rvvkrok; bygdemlsfrgat))

ETYMOLOGI: < fsv. rf; sv. dial. rauv, rav, rv, rv, rv; jfr fd. rf (d. rv), nor. dial. rauv, rv, rv, isl. rauf; hl, ppning; i avljudsfrh. till fsv. riuva, snderbryta, snderriva (se RVA); formen rv beror antingen p (en i vissa dial. frekommande) delabialisering l. p ombildning av rv i eufemistiskt syfte>


0)

(utom ss. frled i ssgr numera bl. starkt vard.). om ndtarmens mynning hos mnniskor

0)

(stundom v. hos hgre djur) l. (vanl.) i utvidgad anv.: ste, nda, stuss, bak (se BAK, sbst.1 1, bakdel (se d. o. b), gump, stjrt;
jfr ARS, ARSHL (med anm.). Svenska Akademien, uppdaterad:2005-06-28

SPALT:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

UTTAL: r4v, v. (numera bl. i vissa trakter, bygdemlsfrgat) RV r4v, sbst.2,
GENUS: r. l. f.
BJNING: best. -en ( NorrlS 10: 30 1635 osv.) ( () -an ngermDomb. 1639, fol. , VDAkt. 1680, nr 325 (1676)); pl. -ar. (rf; i ssg 1912 (: rfkrok). rfwen, sg. best. 1636. rv (rf, rff) 1572 osv. rvv- i ssg 1949 (: rvvkrok; bygdemlsfrgat))

ETYMOLOGI: < fsv. rf; sv. dial. rauv, rav, rv, rv, rv; jfr fd. rf (d. rv), nor. dial. rauv, rv, rv, isl. rauf; hl, ppning; i avljudsfrh. till fsv. riuva, snderbryta, snderriva (se RVA); formen rv beror antingen p (en i vissa dial. frekommande) delabialisering l. p ombildning av rv i eufemistiskt syfte>


0)

(utom ss. frled i ssgr numera bl. starkt vard.). om ndtarmens mynning hos mnniskor

0)

(stundom v. hos hgre djur) l. (vanl.) i utvidgad anv.: ste, nda, stuss, bak (se BAK, sbst.1 1, bakdel (se d. o. b), gump, stjrt;
jfr ARS, ARSHL (med anm.).

________________________________________________________________

This is beyond doubt, I apologize for not translating the scandinavian parts.

AND :

But Sailers report that

Apolitical, nonreligious Scandinavian parents raised Rove in Utah.

raises a fascinating possibility.

Utah, (and indeed the Rocky Mountain States generally) would have been an unusual destination for Scandinavian immigrants. They more usually headed for the lumbering, dairying, or maritime areas. There was one notable exception: Mormon converts.

The Mormon Church actively recruited in Scandinavia in the 19th Century, when converts were expected to immigrate to Utah. In fact, it turns out that the first Mormon convert from Scandinavia was named Rove. Could it be that Karl Rove comes from a family of lapsed or Jack Mormons?

Fascinating

Karma is a bitch
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Son of California Donating Member (467 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-20-05 04:06 PM
Response to Original message
1. WOW, YOU WENT DEEP ON THAT ONE.
hahahaha.
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tocqueville Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-20-05 04:09 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. NO PUN INTENDED ?
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TahitiNut Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-20-05 04:24 PM
Response to Original message
3. My grandparents immigrated from Norway in 1917.
My grandfather's eldest brother was the first to come to the US, about 1912, and was a Mormon 'convert' who settled temporarily in North Dakota before moving west.

The LDS church has some of the most complete genealogical records available, so I was able to access them when researching that branch of my family tree.

The problem with calling Rove a descendant of Norwegian immigrants is: he's a bastard. His mother, before she died, apparently let him know that his biological father wasn't the 'father' who raised him.
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tocqueville Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-20-05 04:38 PM
Response to Reply #3
5. Of course it can be a coincidence
but :

The English word "rove" etymology goes back to Scandinavian/Old Germanic, even latin

rove, rover, robber, rauben (german), rv, rva, rumpere (latin = break) are basically the same word, even if some connections can be by association

it makes sense that roving people were robbers and therefore called by associated harsh words.

I found the second Scandinavian association (family) by chance on Google. Interesting that he is using the spelling "Karl" (germanic)
instead of Carl.

and the fact that he is a bastard (take it as you want) doesn't mean that the name cannot be associated to Scandinavian origins. Maybe they kept the fooling around within the same group of immigrants.

In older times people could be called for what they were in real life, physical features or where they were living. It was very common.
And the name changes to modern names only happened at the end of the 19th century in Scandinavia.

Even if all this is speculation, it's funny anyway.
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TahitiNut Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-20-05 05:29 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. "Karl" is the standard Norwegian spelling.
I have a couple of distant (3rd & 4th) cousins in Norway named "Karl".

I cling to the notion that Rove is illegitimate ... otherwise, I'd have to admit some measurable chance he's related to me. (God help me! My tree has enough rotten apples already.)
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Just Me Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-20-05 04:29 PM
Response to Original message
4. *LOL*
Now, why did that post make me laugh? I guess some things still strike me as funny no matter what the situation: like watching someone smack into a meter *ouch* and you just cannot stop yourself from giggling.
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