Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

What exactly is Napalm and what are the effects from exposure?

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (Through 2005) Donate to DU
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-18-05 11:56 PM
Original message
What exactly is Napalm and what are the effects from exposure?
I think alot of people hear these terms, including myself, and know it must be pretty terrible, but it would be helpful to know more about napalm and the reasons why it has been outlawed from usage. I shudder to think what it does but no doubt its important to know.

Can those of you who know more about it, shed some light on what napalm is exactly?

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
teach1st Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-18-05 11:58 PM
Response to Original message
1. iraqanalysis.org has a good summary
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:06 AM
Response to Reply #1
5. Thanks so much teach*
I'll bookmark the link.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
tk2kewl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-18-05 11:59 PM
Response to Original message
2. what it is: flaming petroleum based gel
what it does: burns people to death
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:05 AM
Response to Reply #2
4. my god......what could ever be a reason to use something like this?
As if being bombed, shot or stabbed isn't enough.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
ThomWV Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:09 AM
Response to Reply #4
7. To Be Brutaly Honest About It
It is used mostly to reach into places where bullits can not easily go. Down into holes, caves, places where the straight line trajectory of a conventional weapon is a drawback. You asked.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:10 AM
Response to Reply #7
9. Yes I did ask. Thanks Thom*
n/t
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
MercutioATC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:34 AM
Response to Reply #4
28. You're kidding, right?
Napalm is an area-effect weapon that effects structures, vegetation and living things (like people). Because it's essentially jellied gasoline, it sticks to things and burns and is nearly impossible to extinguish.

Yes, it may seem brutal, but it's an effective weapon when your target isn't very visible.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:58 AM
Response to Reply #28
31. Mercutio would you like to be on the receiving end of this effectiveness?
"You're kidding right"?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
MercutioATC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 02:44 AM
Response to Reply #31
32. Of course not.
But you're the one who asked "my god......what could ever be a reason to use something like this?"......
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 03:17 AM
Response to Reply #32
34. And I still ask it. As EVERYONE should.
Nobody, NOBODY deserves such a death or a horrifically scorching torture.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
MercutioATC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 03:33 AM
Response to Reply #34
35. Of course not, but napalm is a fact of life...
...and, in fact, quite effective.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
baldguy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 09:13 AM
Response to Reply #4
41. Someone once said "War is hell"
Which is why everyone should be incredibly angry the Bush lied to start this war.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
spindoctor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:03 AM
Response to Original message
3. It is basically slow burning gasoline
To be exact, gas mixed with naphtalene and palmitic acid (na-palm).

It's a WWII invention that worked more effectively in flamethrowers than regular gasoline (which burns too fast). It was so effective that it was later used in bombs as well.

The biggest (only?) manufacturer of napalm is good old DOW.

In essence it is just shit that burns really, really hot for a really, really long time.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:10 AM
Response to Reply #3
8. Thanks SD. I think if people knew more about the nuts and bolts of wars
and actually knew what a war actually IS and knew what is being done in greater detail, they'd worry less about placing a yellow sticker on their cars and get to work on stopping these mind boggling assaults on innocent lives.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
ThomWV Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:06 AM
Response to Original message
6. Jellied Gasoline
Is a good way to think about it. At any rate it is a very thick liquid that burns ferociously. It can be easily packaged in bombs (though not in artillery shells) and acting essentially as a liquid gives good coverage as a weapon. It is generally considered to burn its victims to death but in fact most suffocate. Napalm uses up a lot of oxygen as it burns.

Oh, you could use it to clean your hands in a pinch. I doubt that would be any good for you, but not much worse than gasoline.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Tom Kitten Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:11 AM
Response to Original message
10. it sticks to you and actually consumes your flesh in fire
As if third degree burns weren't bad enough, napalm victims suffered from what were called fourth and fifth degree burns...

http://www.vietnamese-american.org/b2.html
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
MercutioATC Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:37 AM
Response to Reply #10
29. That's a different classification method. We don't recognize 4th and 5th
degree burns in this country (it's not like they're more severe than our 3rd degree burns).
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
daleo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:11 AM
Response to Original message
11. I think it sticks to stuff while it burns
For example, the human body.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
TahitiNut Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:13 AM
Response to Original message
12. Some things it's important to understand.
Edited on Sun Jun-19-05 12:16 AM by TahitiNut
Napalm has been designed to adhere to whatever it splashes against and to be difficult to extinguish. Modern napalm is difficult to smother (like with a blanket or by rolling on the ground) since it contains oxidants, thus needing less oxygen from the environment. The component that makes it sticky is polystyrene which, when burned, is toxic and carcinogenic. Vietnam-era napalm contained benzene which is also toxic and carcinogenic. The DOE completed a 9-figure project to destroy some stored napalm a few years ago at a weapons depot. The method? Incineration. The problem? Burning it without releasing toxins and carcinogens.

Nasty stuff. I saw it used in February 1969.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:44 AM
Response to Reply #12
19. I wonder if those who survive it are left with chronic pain, suffering
not to mention the increased potential for cancer.

That is, if one survives. Does a person?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
TahitiNut Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:20 AM
Response to Reply #19
26. She survived. (14 months of hospitalization)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Jackpine Radical Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:12 PM
Response to Reply #12
49. I saw it used in '67-68 in both bombs & flamethrowers.
It was used a lot in Vietnam because the VC were so well dug into bunkers, tunnels & caves that our most effective way of dealing with them was to burn out the oxygen from where they were.

There are other "nice" toys besides napalm. White phosphorus is one. "Willie Peter" lands on you & just keeps burning no matter what you do.

I really wonder how many people are ignorant of what napalm is. Maybe ignorance is why there is so little outcry against us using it.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
teach1st Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:13 AM
Response to Original message
13. More
From Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napalm

In World War II, Allied Forces bombed cities in Japan with napalm, and used it in bombs and flamethrowers in Germany and the Japanese-held islands. It was used by the Greek army against communist guerilla fighters during the Greek Civil War, by United Nations forces in Korea, by Mexico in the late 1960s against guerrilla fighters in Guerrero and by the United States during the Vietnam War.

Napalm is the most terrible pain you can imagine, said Kim Phuc, known from a famous Vietnam War photograph. Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius. Napalm generates temperatures of 800 to 1,200 degrees Celsius. <1> (http://www.advance.uconn.edu/2004/041108/04110803.htm )

Like many Vietnamese children before and after her, Phuc sustained third-degree burns to half her body and was not expected to live. But thanks to assistance from an American photographer, and after surviving a 14-month hospital stay and 17 operations, she became an outspoken peace activist.

The use of napalm and other incendiaries against civilian populations was banned by a United Nations convention in 1980 <2> (http://fletcher.tufts.edu/multi/texts/BH790.txt ). The United States did not sign the agreement, but claimed to have destroyed its napalm arsenal by 2001.

The United States officially destroyed its last container of napalm in a public ceremony in 1991, however it had reportedly been using napalm-like incendiaries in the 2003 invasion of Iraq <3> (http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/03/21/1047749944836... )). In August 2003, the Pentagon confirmed the use of Mark 77 firebombs.

"We napalmed both those approaches," said Colonel James Alles, commander of Marine Air Group 11. "Unfortunately there were people there ... you could see them in the cockpit video. They were Iraqi soldiers. It's no great way to die. The generals love napalm. It has a big psychological effect."
These bombs contain a substance "remarkably similar" to napalm. This substance is made with kerosene, a polystyrene derivative, and other additives. <4> (http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/military/20030805-99... )



For more on Kim Phuc, the woman who was napalmed in Vietnam as a child, and the famous (and disturbing) picture of her running naked down a road after being napalmed, click here.

Whenever I see that picture now, I think of the beautiful Vietnamese children who have brightened my classroom and what must have happened to thousands of innocent children just like them, thirty or so years ago in their home country. I also think about the thousands of beautiful Iraqi children who have been maimed and killed in what our country described as the "precision bombing raids" that only hit strategic targets. So when the US says napalm was only used on soldiers in Iraq, it is not unreasonable to have doubts.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:21 AM
Response to Reply #13
15. Napalm is the most terrible pain you can imagine,
n/t
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
freethought Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:15 AM
Response to Original message
14. Napalm is a nasty weapon
The previous post said it acurately, a pretroleum based gel. It used to be made with gasoline. Something was added to thicken the fuel up. The idea is that, when ignited, napalm will sustain a longer burn than a straight volatile or flammable liquid. Once or twice I have had isopropanol ignite on my bare skin ( I used to work with hazardous chemical for a living). The isopropanol is so volatile on warm skin that it vaporizes very quickly and burns of quickly not doing anything to the skin (please don't try this at home, I was once certifiable).

With napalm, it burns for a long time doing more damage and causing more severe burns. It is an indiscriminate weapon and will do as much or worse damage to non-combatants/civilians as well as any enemy.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Oversea Visitor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:30 AM
Response to Original message
16. Napalm
OMG you guys need to go find out more about Depleted Uranium.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:33 AM
Response to Reply #16
17. Please include any information you have OV
Edited on Sun Jun-19-05 12:41 AM by shance
If you have information, put it here or start a thread on Depleted Uranium.

I'm not very educated on that subject either and I bet it would help some others out too.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Oversea Visitor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:59 AM
Response to Reply #17
25. Dig around in
Edited on Sun Jun-19-05 01:00 AM by Oversea Visitor
www.gulfwarvets.com, I did a lot of digging around when I was finding out more about it. Lost all the link now so sorry

www.gulfwarvets.com
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
CoffeeCat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:35 AM
Response to Original message
18. It sounds like napalm is a "Weapon of Mass Destruction"...
...I mean, what's the difference between gassing people and throwing burning gasoline on their bodies?

Sickened!

Was this used in Iraq by our military?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
shance Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:46 AM
Response to Reply #18
20. I agree TS. It does sound as though it could be.
n/t
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
teach1st Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:48 AM
Response to Reply #18
21. Yes, the US used napalm in Iraq..
http://www.globalsecurity.org/org/news/2003/030810-napa...

US admits it used napalm bombs in Iraq

American pilots dropped the controversial incendiary agent napalm on Iraqi troops during the advance on Baghdad. The attacks caused massive fireballs that obliterated several Iraqi positions.

The Pentagon denied using napalm at the time, but Marine pilots and their commanders have confirmed that they used an upgraded version of the weapon against dug-in positions. They said napalm, which has a distinctive smell, was used because of its psychological effect on an enemy.

A 1980 UN convention banned the use against civilian targets of napalm, a terrifying mixture of jet fuel and polystyrene that sticks to skin as it burns. The US, which did not sign the treaty, is one of the few countries that makes use of the weapon. It was employed notoriously against both civilian and military targets in the Vietnam war.


Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
uppityperson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:48 AM
Response to Reply #18
22. gooey burning gasoline, not liquidy gasoline
think of thickened sticky burning gasoline, syrupy burning gasoline

It is sick.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
CoffeeCat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:55 AM
Response to Reply #22
23. You're right...it is sick...I also thought it was illegal.
Am I remembering incorrectly, but wasn't napalm banned after Vietnam?

How sick is our country?

God this just makes me so angry that my tax dollars are paying for such atrocities!!!

I'm sorry world. :(
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Cessna Invesco Palin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 09:08 AM
Response to Reply #23
39. Use on civilian populations is banned. n/t
As far as I know there are no restrictions on its use on combat units.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Toots Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 09:15 AM
Response to Reply #18
42. Actually gas is not really a WMD
Unless gas is released in a contained area it disperses rapidly and is not very effective. A high explosive round is far more effective in killing people. The reason gas is included in the WMD class of weapon is because of how scary it is. A weapon you can't see or smell is terrifying but not very effective at all. What is the difference of burning a person to death with napalm or blowing them to smitherines with high explosive? The end result is the same. It is a very good sight when under heavy attack and a couple of jets swoop in and drop napalm in front of the perimeter. It is something to cheer about when actually involved. When you are faced with immediate death or injury you will celebrate anything that changes that scenerio believe me.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Swede Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:58 AM
Response to Original message
24. It also smothers everyone in the bomb shelters by eating up the oxygen.
Any men,women or children seeking shelter from bombs will choke to death instead.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
longship Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:26 AM
Response to Original message
27. Jellied gasoline
effects? The flesh is burned right off your bones.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
pfitz59 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:57 AM
Response to Original message
30. Kind of a modern version of this......
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Selatius Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 03:06 AM
Response to Original message
33. We used to make "poor man's napalm" when we were kids
We used orange juice concentrate, and we mixed it with gasoline. You end up with a substance that is flammable and will stick to whatever it splashes on.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
LynnTheDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 03:48 AM
Response to Original message
36. Photo Iraqi deaths by US in Gulf War ***WARNING GRAPHIC***


Incinerated body of an Iraqi soldier on the "Highway of Death," a name the press has given to the road from Mutlaa, Kuwait, to Basra, Iraq. U.S. planes immobilized the convoy by disabling vehicles at its front and rear, then bombing and straffing the resulting traffic jam for hours. More than 2,000 vehicles and tens of thousands of charred and dismembered bodies littered the sixty miles of highway. The clear rapid incineration of the human being (pictured above) suggests the use of napalm, phosphorus, or other incindiary bombs.

This is what the US did on the "Highway of Death", Basra highway;



This is what the UK said about what the US did on Basra highway;

UK Parliament
House of Commons
column 1347

Hon. Members will know that I am not emotional about many subjects. But I suggest that, emotionally, we shall be haunted for a long time to come by what has happened in the last few weeks. We shall be haunted in particular by what occurred on the Basra road. That was done in the name of the American Congress and the British House of Commons.
http://www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/cm...

Yeah sure...they "hate us for our freedoms". :eyes:

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
fed-up Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 08:49 AM
Response to Reply #36
37. Links to Highway of Death sites/The Unseen Gulf War by Peter Turnley/DU
Warning, these are very graphic photos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highway_of_Death

http://www.digitaljournalist.org/issue0212/pt04.html
Highway of Death Photos

http://www.globalresearch.ca/articles/CHE407A.html
Remember the 1991 Gulf War:
The Massacre of Withdrawing Soldiers on "The Highway of Death"
byJoyce Chediac
Commission of Inquiry for the International War Crimes Tribunal, 1992
www.globalresearch.ca 8 July 2004

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/95178_du12.shtml
Tuesday, November 12, 2002


Iraqi cancers, birth defects blamed on U.S. depleted uranium
By LARRY JOHNSON
SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER FOREIGN DESK EDITOR

SOUTHERN DEMILITARIZED ZONE, Iraq -- On the "Highway of Death," 11 miles north of the Kuwait border, a collection of tanks, armored personnel carriers and other military vehicles are rusting in the desert.


They also are radiating nuclear energy.
Paul Kitagaki Jr. / P-I


Six-year-old Fatma Rakwan, being held by her mother at the Basra Hospital for Maternity and Children, was recently diagnosed with leukemia.


In 1991, the United States and its Persian Gulf War allies blasted the vehicles with armor-piercing shells made of depleted uranium -- the first time such weapons had been used in warfare -- as the Iraqis retreated from Kuwait. The devastating results gave the highway its name....

...DU shell holes in the vehicles along the Highway of Death are 1,000 times more radioactive than background radiation, according to Geiger counter readings done for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer by Dr. Khajak Vartaanian, a nuclear medicine expert from the Iraq Department of Radiation Protection in Basra, and Col. Amal Kassim of the Iraqi navy....

...A second, potentially more serious hazard is created when a DU round hits its target. As much as 70 percent of the projectile can burn up on impact, creating a firestorm of ceramic DU oxide particles. The residue of this firestorm is an extremely fine ceramic uranium dust that can be spread by the wind, inhaled and absorbed into the human body and absorbed by plants and animals, becoming part of the food chain....
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Coexist Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 08:59 AM
Response to Original message
38. Can someone who knows compare/contrast Napalm : Mustard Gas
How many it kills in what radius, etc.
In The Fog of War, it was discussed how firebombs killed 100,000 people in one night (how horrible) and was that necessary. This administration is constantly ranting on how Saddam used WMD (mustard gas - that we provided him with) on Kurdish rebels.

Is this new napalm at all comparable in human and medical cost?
Sorry to ask you to do my work for me - I will check it out myself, but I thought someone more knowledgeable might have handy links/stats and save me some time.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
LynnTheDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 09:09 AM
Response to Reply #38
40. Mustard gas is rarely lethal and it is not & never has been "WMD".
Mustard gas is an area denial weapon and is not effective against large numbers of people.

Napalm is a direct fireweapon; mustard gas is indirect (area denial).

Napalm is in the area of 100% lethal; mustard gas 2%; against trained troops).

Napalm is in the area of 100% lethal; mustard gas 14%; against civilians.

This (and the above) is from my "WMD" expert hubby;

Napalm to mustard gas is like a bullet in the head to a punch in the gut.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Coexist Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 09:24 AM
Response to Reply #40
43. wow - thank you.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
LynnTheDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 09:57 AM
Response to Reply #43
45. Hubby says "you're welcome'. nt
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
kenny blankenship Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 09:55 AM
Response to Original message
44. Freedom Juice! that's what it is-why do you ask?
Is someone saying bad things about it?
Frankly I don't know why it's banned. It's pretty indiscriminate and horrible in its effects but so is white phosphorous.

how bad could it be?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Swede Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 12:47 PM
Response to Reply #44
47. Freedom juice!
Oh you are evil,funny,but evil. :)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Coexist Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:03 PM
Response to Reply #47
48. has a nice ring to it
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
crimson333 Donating Member (760 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 10:02 AM
Response to Original message
46. Just watch We Were Soldiers
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
midnight armadillo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jun-19-05 01:16 PM
Response to Original message
50. Didn't you ever see Apocalypse Now?
"I love the smell of napalm in the morning" - truly one of the most evil sentences ever said on film.

Information on the US MK77 napalm bomb: http://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/dumb/mk77.htm

A fire bomb is a thin skinned container of fuel gel designed for use against dug-in troops, supply installations, wooden structures, and land convoys. The MK 77 500-pound fire bomb is the only fire bomb now in service. Fire bombs rupture on impact and spread burning fuel gel on surrounding objects. MK 13 Mod 0 igniters are used to ignite the fuel gel mixture upon impact.

The MK-77 is a napalm canister munition. The MK77 familiy is an evolution of the incendiary bombs M-47 and M-74, used during the conflict in Korea and the war in Vietnam. Napalm is an incendiary mixture of benzene, gasoline and polystyrene. The Marine Corps dropped all of the approximately 500 MK-77s used in the Gulf War. They were delivered primarily by the AV-8 Harriers from relatively low altitudes. MK-77s were used to ignite the Iraqis oil-filled fire trenches, which were part of barriers constructed in southern Kuwait.

The containers of napalm bomber are very light and fabricated of aluminum, with a capacity for about 75 gallons of combustible gel. They lack stabilizing fins, and consequently acquire a tumbling motion on being dropped that contributes to the scattering of the combustible gel over a wide area.

While the MK-77 is the only incendiary munition currently in active inventory, a variety of other incendiary devices were produced, including the M-47 Napalm bomb, the M-74 incendiary bomb, and white phosphorous and munitions manufacturing. Production of these devices continued during the Korean conflict, though various demilitarization and decontamination programs were initiated in the late 1950s. Munitions destroyed included M-47 Napalm-filled bombs and incendiary cluster bombs.

Napalm is a mixture of benzene (21%), gasoline (33%), and polystyrene (46%). Benzene is a normal component of gasoline (about 2%). The gasoline used in napalm is the same leaded or unleaded gas that is used in automobiles.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Tue Sep 02nd 2014, 07:00 PM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (Through 2005) Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC