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Are our longer lifespans slowing social progression?

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LostInAnomie Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jan-28-05 11:53 PM
Original message
Are our longer lifespans slowing social progression?
The average lifespan of the average American is extending well into the 70's. With the graying of our population comes a glut of people who are tied to social mores of days long past. This has been reflected with the election of '04 where people who once considered themselves liberals voted to ban gay marriage in their states, and against other socially progressive issues of concern to younger Americans.

Do you feel that social progression will continue to slow as the lifespan continues to extend.

Discuss.
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Spangle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-29-05 12:00 AM
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1. How far can the age go?
At one point people were luck to live to be 30. So this really isn't new.
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salvorhardin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-29-05 12:00 AM
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2. I think social progression is a myth
There's no reason to think that societies progress along a continuous curve. In fact, I'd say it's pretty unlikely.

Now, if you mean social change, I don't think longer lifespans has to necessarily equate to social stagnation. Longer lifespans could result in increased social change as we have more time to invent and refine technologies, and participate in more than one career. We'd also have more time for play which could result in more liberal attitudes on a variety of social issues.
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TwentyFive Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jan-29-05 01:00 AM
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3. Nice question. My take is...
I don't think it affects anything.

Although people live longer, they also adapt to change better. Back when life expectancy was 65, people were less well educated, and seldom needed to change their opinions on anything. You became an adult at 18, and by 50 you were an old man.


We've had 'gay marriage' debates in my family, and to my surprise the 'white haired people' are quite accepting of it. One example is my 91 year old great aunt....a dignified Boston lady who still drives everyday, and manages a few trips to Florida during the winter. Ask her about gay marriage, and she'll tell you that gays should stand up for their civil rights. However, I'm sure she didn't always think this way.

The people who can't handle change, find a home in the republican party.
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